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Full text of "Carpenter"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/carpenter85unit 



Official Publication of the 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD Of CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

CARPENTER 




FOUNDED 1881 



JANUARY 196 







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- ^~; « 



wV 






KEEP HEAL THY 
IN COLD WEATHER 

Most carpentry is performed either outdoors, in poorly-heated or completely unheated 
buildings under construction. It pays dividends, in good health and wages which come 
from staying healthy and on the job, to wear plenty of warm and dry clothes. Avoid 
chills, wet feet, hands and head which may contribute to colds. Dress right to stay right! 

1ND00RS-0UTD00RS -/^ . 1/fA^fi, 
A VOID ILLNESS /^//**e&- 




THE 



<3/A\D3[p 




VOLUME LXXXV 



NO. I 



JANUARY, 1965 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Acting Editor 




IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Washington Prepares for the Inauguration 

Top Architect Warns of Sub-Contract Perils 6 

Mandate for Action, Statement for the AFL-CIO Council ... 9 

The Log-Lifting Balloon 12 

Apprenticeship, A Restatement of Brotherhood Policy 13 

Tools for the Space Frontier 14 

What Would Happen to George Washington Today? 15 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 8 

Editorials 11 

Canadian Section 21 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Soetz 22 

Official Information 24 

Local Union News 25 

What's New? 33 

Index to Advertisers 34 

Kennedy-Roosevelt Fund Report 34 

In Memoriam 35 

Lakeland News 38 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent lo 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington 1, D. C. 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington 18, D. C, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20? in advance! 



17 <3afeS:;»p*s>i7 
Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

"Eternity looks grander and kinder 
if time grows meaner and more hos- 
tile," Thomas Carlyle, an English phi- 
losopher, once said. 

Although the problems of the world 
and our own personal problems seem 
to be never-ending, as we start the 
new year, the best preparation for the 
future is to perform our present duties 
to the best of our abilities. 

Old Man Time 1964 seems to have 
brought America more than its usual 
share of problems, both domestically 
and on the foreign scene. 

The civil rights issue has disclosed 
a prejudice and narrowmindedness 
that is a disgrace to the democratic 
way of life. 

The Communists have rededicated 
themselves to the overthrow of demo- 
cratic freedom in the Western World, 
and in 1964 Red China produced its 
first nuclear bomb. 

Viet Nam still looms as another 
Korea and possibly worse. 

Maybe this coming year will bring 
the world one step closer to the high- 
est of goals — peace. We must have 
peace because, in the future, the al- 
ternative to peace is not war, but 
total annihilation. 

May 1965 be one of successful 
achievements, not only in our per- 
sonal lives, but in the quest for inter- 
national peace and understanding. 



CARPENTER 






Washington Council Members Busy as January 20th Deadline Nears 




o n : 



-i 

(Above) Kitting on-site cut risers. (Be- 
low) Robert Mcrrithew, L.U. 528, fastens 
cross-bracing. 




NCE every four years, the Na- 
ion's capital city shrugs off 
its quiet, conservative dress and ex- 
plodes in a glittering show of pomp 
and hoopla. From multiple official 
halls through a two-and-a-half-hour 
parade to thousands of private cele- 
brations, the city goes through a 
week of festivities reserved for the 
inauguration of Presidents. 

This year, there will be a number 
of changes in procedure and style. 
Some are traditional accommoda- 
tions. Others are real departures 
from precedent. 

The focal point of the entire in- 
auguration is the ceremony at the 
East Front of the Capitol, where 
official swearing-in ceremonies take 
place. Always before, the transfer 
— or renewal — of Presidential power 
has waited for 45 minutes or so past 



Traditionally, the President-elect and 
the official party have worn top hat 
and tails. 

Also, the Committee is "trying to 
get a little more serious note" into 
the character of the parade of states 
and military units which follows the 
swearing-in. In earlier years just 
about every imaginable form of pa- 
rade trapping has moved down 
Pennsylvania Avenue from the Cap- 
itol to the White House. This time 
the parade Committee hopes to per- 
suade the states to be more selective. 

Television viewers, and those for- 
tunate enough to witness Kennedy 
and Eisenhower's inaugurations, will 
remember the saddled buffalo which 
stole the show, prancing in front of 
the Presidential reviewing box. He 
was a real crowd-pleaser, as are the 
perennial bathing beauties who 




Washington Prepares For 




Massive framework of press box across 
from White House. Main supports are 
32-foot fir posts. 



the 12:00 noon starting time, until 
addresses were made by dignitaries, 
and a prayer offered. 

But the 1964 Inaugural Commit- 
tee, under the leadership of Dale 
Miller, a long-time friend of the 
President and a native Texan, has 
decided to begin the swearing-in 
precisely at noon. The Constitution 
calls for the new President's term 
to begin at that moment, and the 
Committee was concerned about the 
status of the nation's leadership dur- 
ing the minutes of opening amen- 
ities. To resolve the issue, they put 
President Johnson at the head of the 
program. 

In another break with tradition, 
the President will be wearing a gray 
business suit and a soft black hat. 



shiver steel-cold in Washington's 
January chill. 

In an effort to keep down the 
length of the parade, and get it past 
the end of the route before nightfall, 
the Committee is also rationing each 
state's share of the parade. One 
band, one marching unit, and one 
float will be allowed. 

In the past, the Eastern states 
have been the most frequent par- 
ticipants, while the far Western 
members of the union have found 
it more difficult to pay the freight to 
the East Coast. 

There is no doubt which state will 
be leading the show. As specified 
by tradition, Texas will field the 
first unit. Then follows Minnesota, 
honoring the Vice President's state. 



THE CARPENTER 



After these two honorary positions 
come the other states in the order 
of their admission into the union. 

To accommodate the dignitaries, 
people who want to view the parade 
from the comfort of purchased seats, 
and the press, $431,000 worth of 
wooden stands, bleachers and press 
boxes are being built on a tight time 
schedule and the nagging possibility 
of a heavy snowstorm or two be- 
tween now and the appointed day. 

In 1961, the city was totally para- 
lyzed during the night before the 
inauguration by a heavy snow fall. 
Emergency crews of military per- 
sonnel, city employes and others 
turned out with shovel and broom 
to keep the stands cleared. And just 
about every piece of city snow re- 
moval equipment put on its own 
preliminary parade along the route, 
to keep the inaugural on schedule. 
Men were still sweeping when the 
ceremonies began at the Capitol. 



were completed far in advance of 
the inauguration ceremonies. By 
the first of December, they were 80 
per cent, or better, finished. 

The rest of the specially-built in- 
augural stands — mostly located in 
the White House block of Pennsyl- 
vania Avenue — had to be con- 
structed under a much tighter time 
schedule. Work was not begun un- 
til November 16 — a little over two 
months before the event and less 
than two months to go before the 
completion date of January 13. 

On the White House side of the 
avenue, the President's reviewing 
stand had to be built. The most 
ornate yet built for an inauguration, 
it will provide the President, his per- 
sonal friends, and various dignitaries 
with a high vantage point, and pro- 
tect them from the weather. 

A forest of 36 delicately-finned 
columns, 21 V2 feet tall, support a 
four-foot thick flat canopy. Plastic- 



The Inauguration 



To provide seats for the most- 
respected participants and observers 
at the swearing-in, large stands are 
erected over the back steps of the 
Capitol. Joining the President and 
Vice President will be foreign min- 
isters and ambassadors, state gov- 
ernors, the President's cabinet, the 
Supreme Court, members of Con- 
gress and the nation's top military 
leaders. 

Facing them across the plaza will 
be a battery of newsmen and news 
cameras, ensconced in a specially- 
built press booth. In addition, there 
are stands for 16,000 spectators in 
Capitol Plaza. 

These facilities, which required 
about 400,000 board feet of yellow 
Southern pine, and cost $184,000, 

JANUARY, 1965 



covered skylights at the top of each 
column admit diffused light, which 
will bathe the columns and help il- 
luminate the President and his 
guests. The whole pavilion will have 
a graceful, airy look, much different 
from those in earlier years. 

Flanking the reviewing stand, and 
across the street, will be bleacher 
seats for 15,000 people, and over 
their heads, in the center section, 
will be another massive press box 
for radio, TV and photo reporters. 
Extra strong posts were needed to 
support the press box. To carry the 
extra weight, 32-foot fir 8 x 8's were 
used. 

Throughout the entire job, safety 
was a primary concern. The con- 
struction technique for the relatively 



In charge of Capitol Stand Construc- 
tion, Millard Musgrove carries board 
past East front. 



-jam 



- 




IIHSSIIB*""" "t**IIPiiWliil 






#* 





(Above) Placing risers on White House 
stands. (Below) Brothers Rob and C. W. 
Skinner trim a joist. 






Laborer E. Carpenter 
clears a working area. 



On sidewalk in front 
of White House, T. C. 
Leaf and P. J. Dick 
place a foundation 
block. 



George Washington's inauguration, Federal 
Hall, N. Y., April 30, 1789. 



simple bleachers harks back to the 
day of wooden bridges and trestles. 
Underneath the seat tiers is a dense 
network of crossed and bolted 
trusses, supporting over 8,000 risers 
on each side of the press box. 

"You don't see this kind of con- 
struction very often today," re- 
marked Project Superintendent Lar- 
ry Harris. "The lumber is the 
strongest we can get — number-one 
yellow pine, graded at the mills." 
Specifications are the tightest of any 
inaugural job. Larry, who works for 
the Aberthaw Construction Com- 
pany, which won the contract award, 
is on his fourth inaugural stand job. 

About half a million board feet 
of lumber and 20 tons of bolts will 



be used for the White House area 
stands. Another 100,000 board feet 
or so was to go into special press 
platforms located at other strategic 
points along the parade route. 

Carpenters from all over the 
Washington area, including Mary- 
land and Virginia suburbs, were at 
work on the stands. A peak force 
of close to a hundred men were kept 
busy in the White House area alone. 
They are all members of local un- 
ions of the D. C. Carpenter's Coun- 
cil. 

Although the Capitol Plaza and 
White House area stands are the 
most impressive, another 24,000 
seats will be provided all along the 
parade route by standard bleachers. 




All of this must be ready by Jan- 
uary 13, to be used for a few hours 
on January 20 and then torn down. 
The D. C. Government has allowed 
one month for the removal of the 
White House stands, and this job 
has been subcontracted by Aber- 
thaw. The wrecker will most likely 
sell salvaged lumber on the spot. 

By the time the salvage crews go 
to work on the stands, some post- 
inaugural celebrations will still be 
in progress. The disassembly is 
scheduled to start the day after the 
inauguration, and all over Washing- 
ton late private parties for digni- 




The 1961 pavilion used for Kennedy's swearing-in 
at Capitol Plaza. 



Kennedy's White House parade review pavilion, seen from the press box 
across Pennsylvania Avenue. 



THE CARPENTER 



During the Capitol Plaza stand construc- 
tion, carpenters take a lunch break. 




taries, Democratic party leaders, 
Washington's socialites and just 
plain citizens will cap the glitter of 
the Inaugural balls and the preced- 
ing social events. 

Like the 1961 celebration, this 
year's inauguration will require a 
number of large public facilities 
scattered across the city. The Ken- 
nedy program began January 18, 
with a reception for distinguished 
ladies at the National Gallery of 
Art. That same evening, a reception 
and buffet honored Vice President 
and Mrs. Lyndon Johnson at the 
Statler-Hilton Hotel. 

The following afternoon, Gov- 
ernors were received at the Sheraton- 
Park Hotel and in the evening, a 
Democratic Party gala attracted 
thousands to the National Guard 
Armory, Washington's largest roof- 
ed-over floor area. 

The inaugural balls themselves 
were held in three locations — the 
Armory, the Mayflower Hotel and 
the Sheraton Park Hotel. 




Abraham Lincoln's inaugural address, on the Capitol steps, March 4, 1861. Facilities 
were constructed of rough, unfinished lumber. 



Although the Inaugural Commit- 
tee had not made firm plans for lo- 
cation of the 1965 events by the 
first week in December, one of 
Washington's newest and most lux- 
urious hotels, the Washington Hil- 
ton, was pushing last-minute con- 
struction work in hopes of catering 
to at least some of the inaugural 
festivities. 

Understandably, Washington is 
jammed with out-of-town guests 
during the inaugural week. Some 
estimates call for 8,000 or more this 
time. Many of them are the Demo- 
cratic Party faithful, anxious to cele- 
brate the event they laborod long to 
bring about. Others are well-wish- 
ing citizens, who may have travelled 
long distances to be among the 50- 
60,000 people who will pay from 
$3.50 to $15.00 to sit in the bleach- 
ers, or $25 for a box. 



The Washington glitter is expen- 
sive. Above the $184,000 cost of 
the Capitol Plaza stands — which is 
appropriated by Congress from tax 
money — the bill for facilities and 
events will come to about $1.5 mil- 
lion. All of this, and more, is nor- 
mally raised by the Inaugural 
Committee by the sale of seat tickets, 
special commemorative license 
plates and medals, tickets to the 
balls, and souvenir programs. 

They do so well in their fund 
raising, normally, that there is 
money left over, and it is put to 
good use. After the 1961 inaugura- 
tion, out of a profit of about $250,- 
000, $220,000 was contributed to 
charitable causes. The remainder 
was salted away in the kitty which 
helped to kick off the 1965 show. 
It looks like this one may be the 
best yet. 




Fireworks over the White House marked 
Truman's 1949 inauguration. 



The swearing-in of President Kennedy, January 20, 1961. Administering the oath 
(left) is Chief Justice Earl Warren. Johnson, Nixon watch at right. 



JANUARY, 1965 



'When qualified specialty contractors are pressured into submitting unrealistical 



Top Architect 

Warns of 

Sub-Contract 

Perils 




TOR A LONG TIME building 
trades unions have contended that 
the practice of sub-contracting work 
is undermining the whole concept 
of construction by contract. 

When work is contracted out, the 
general often shops around for bids 
by pitting one sub against another. 
This in effect makes the general lit- 
tle more than a broker, because the 
subs are required to bid against each 
other on all phases of the work. 

Often the price is driven down 
to unrealistic figures by bid shop- 
ping. This forces the sub to cut cor- 
ners by shaving the quality of his 
work and making impossible de- 
mands on his men. The result is that 
the client gets short-changed in the 
end, since no one person is totally 
responsible. The practice has been 
giving construction by contract a 
black eye. 

Recently, another powerful voice 
of protest against contracting out 
was added to that of organized labor. 
In a speech to the 44th annual con- 
vention of the Carolinas Branch of 
the Associated General Contractors, 
Arthur Gould Odell, Jr., president 
of The American Institute of Archi- 
tects, laid some cold, hard facts be- 
fore the delegates. In part, Mr. 
Odell said: 

"My being here represents an- 
other opportunity to carry on the 
dialogue between architects and con- 
tractors, and I will begin by reading 
to you an important new policy state- 
ment that has been adopted by the 
national Board of Directors of the 
Institute. It was unanimously passed 
by the Board at its Fall meeting last 
September, and I quote: 

" 'The interests of the client and 
the welfare of the public are of prime 
concern in all building projects, 
and every project involves a design 
function and a construction function 
each with its special responsibilities. 
The architect assumes the responsi- 
bility for coordinating all design 
functions, preparing the contract 
documents, and providing general 
administration of the construction 
contract. It is essential to have the 
construction function undertaken in 

THE CARPENTER 



w bids, their workmanship is bound to suffer/ 



a careful, expeditious and safe man- 
ner under the direction of a capable 
building construction contractor best 
qualified to assume this responsibili- 
ty. Therefore, The American Insti- 
tute of Architects recommends that 
whenever feasible a contract system 
be employed which results in a sin- 
gle responsibility for the construc- 
tion function of the project and 
which utilizes the building construc- 
tion contractor best qualified to as- 
sume such responsibility.' 

"This new policy statement is, I 
believe, self explanatory, as far as it 
goes. It clearly and simply puts The 
American Institute of Architects on 
record as favoring, whenever feasi- 
ble, the single contract system for 
building construction. It is simply a 
recognition of the fact that, as the 
building process has become more 
and more complex the need for co- 
ordinated project management has 
become more and more necessary. 

"But I hasten to point out to you 
that this policy statement, which was 
arrived at after much study and 
thought, is not meant to imply that 
the single contract system is perfect, 
nor that The American Institute of 
Architects is in favor of certain 
practices which have plagued and 
continue to plague the single con- 
tract system. 

"The Institute and the architec- 
tural profession are as concerned as 
ever about the continuation of such 
practices as bid shopping and bid 
peddling. Aside from the ethics of 
such practices, we are concerned 
about the adverse effect they have 
on the quality of construction. When 
qualified specialty contractors are 
pressured into submitting unrealisti- 
cally low bids, their workmanship is 
bound to suffer. 

"We architects also are as con- 
cerned as ever about the need for the 
general contractor to bear the full 
responsibility for the performance 
of all those involved in the construc- 
tion function. When a question arises 
about the project, the architect can 
and should expect the general con- 
tractor to act as the sole spokesman 
for the construction. Nothing can be 



more damaging to the single contract 
system than a general contractor 
who shunts this responsibility off on 
his subcontractors or materials sup- 
pliers. Under the single contract 
system, the architect expects the gen- 
eral contractor, and only the general 
contractor, to answer for the project. 
Otherwise, the very purpose of the 
single contract system is lost. 

"I am aware, gentlemen, that the 
contractor-architect relationship is a 
two-way street. We architects have 
our responsibilities also. We must 
make every effort to see to it that 
our plans and specifications are as 
complete and clear as possible. We 
must deal fairly with the general con- 
tractor in all questions that arise 
during the construction process. 
While acting as the guardian of the 
owner's welfare, we must always 
keep in mind that his welfare is best 
served through fair and impartial 
dealings with all members of the 
building team. 

"There are abuses and shortcom- 
ings in the single contract system, 
but that doesn't alter the fact that 
modern construction, with its em- 
phasis on speed and cost control, re- 
quires that there be one coordinator 
in charge of the construction func- 
tion. That is why the Board of the 
Institute adopted its new policy 
statement. It would be to your ad- 
vantage to see to it that the single 
contract system is made to work as 
efficiently and as ethically as possi- 
ble, and we expect you to do it." 

In closing, Mr. Odell pointed out 
that today's conditions were chal- 
lenging the general contractors to 
make the single contract system of 
construction as efficient and as ethi- 
cal as possible. This is simply a 
recognition of the fact "that as the 
building process has become more 
and more complex, the need for co- 
ordinated project management has 
become more and more necessary," 
he said. 

All this has put the American In- 
stitute of Architects by the side of 
building trades unions in their ef- 
forts to abolish the evils of contrac- 
ting out. 




ARTHUR GOULD ODELL, JR., of 

Charlotte, N. C. whom we quote 
at left, assumed the presidency of 
The American Institute of Archi- 
tects during its 96th annual conven- 
tion in St. Louis, Missouri, last 
June. He advanced to the top post 
automatically, having served as 
first vice president and president- 
designate of the 16,000 member 
national professional society for 
the past year. 

Born in Concord, N. C, the 51- 
year-old Odell is a 1935 graduate 
of Cornell University and later 
studied at the Ecole des Beaux Arts 
in Paris. He organized his Char- 
lotte firm, A. G. Odell, Jr. & Asso- 
ciates, in 1940. 

Odell, who has been credited by 
the Charlotte press with changing 
that city's skyline "almost single- 
handedly," was elevated to AIA 
Fellowship in 1957 "for his notable 
contribution to the advancement of 
the profession by his achievement 
in design." His buildings which dot 
the Tar Heel state, have won nu- 
merous honors, and of the 10 cho- 
sen in 1962 by a cross-section of 
North Carolina architects as their 
favorites, four were Odell-designed 
structures. Charlotte Public Li- 
brary; Concordia Evangelical Lu- 
theran Church, Conover; Charlotte 
Auditorium and Coliseum; and 
Wachovia Bank and Trust Com- 
pany, Charlotte. 

The architect's buildings are by 
no means confined to North Car- 
olina. Other projects from his 
firm's drawing boards include the 
Baltimore Civic Center, a public 
library and senior high school at 
Hagerstown, Md., and an audito- 
rium for Limestone College at 
Gaffney, S. C. 

When questioned about his de- 
sign philosophy. Odell admits that 
all contemporary architecture is 
not good architecture. 

"You don't get contemporary ar- 
chitecture," the new AIA president 
warns, "by building picture win- 
dows looking out on a busy street 
or an automobile graveyard." And 
he has some strong convictions 
about the latter too. 

"You can't mix automobiles and 
people. In new cities, this is a 
prime consideration. There should 
be five or six blocks around the 
center where no cars are allowed." 



JANUARY, 1965 



v7 




Washington ROUNDUP 



VOCATIONAL EDUCATION BOOM . . . Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare 
Anthony Celebreeze announced recently that the Federal vocational education budget 
would go from $34 million to $277 million in the next two years. Money spent on 
National Defense Education Act programs would double. Though the country must put 
more idle men to work. . .particularly in depressed areas... this vocational training 
boost means more school-trained carpenters looking for jobs. Public purse strings 
must be loosened to find jobs for them. 

SCENIC ROADS STUDY . . . The Secretary of Commerce has initiated a study to deter- 
mine the feasibility of a national program of scenic roads and parkways. The 
study will be under the direction of the new Recreation Advisory Council set up 
to carry out the public-recreation-facilities programs just passed by Congress and 
signed into law by President Johnson. Eventually, the study should result in 
more road construction and could put many men back to work in relatively 
depressed areas of the nation. 

THE SKY'S THE LIMIT . . . More than 5,000 industrial firms in the United States are 
directly involved in the nation's efforts to put men on the moon, the Commerce 
Department reports. 

RIGHT-WINGERS STRONGER THAN EVER . . . Although the November election dealt the 
right-wing extremist organizations a powerful blow, they may have become more 
dangerous as a result. An analysis of* right-wing reaction to the election 
results, made by Group Research, which follows right-wing activities closely and 
critically, warns that the extremists aren't going out of business. "In fact," 
Group Research reported, "the far-right showed a new high water mark in political 
activity and is now free to go back to its same old game of reaction, attack, 
suspicion, organization and division." 

NEW METHODS FOR COLLECTIVE BARGAINING STUDIED ... A report is being prepared by 
the National Labor-Management Panel, established by President Kennedy early in 
1963, which is designed to safeguard industrial peace. The report expresses 
strong support for bargaining techniques that permit employers and unions to 
anticipate and thoroughly discuss their problems without the pressure of last- 
minute deadlines. 

NEW YORK BOOMS . . . Since World War II, New York City has put up as much new 
office space as Chicago, Los Angeles, and San Francisco combined, National Geo- 
graphic says. In 1963 alone, 9,080 buildings costing $900 million were completed. 



UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE claims are going up seasonally but not as much as last • 
year at this time. New unemployment claims rose 72,500 to a total of 346,100 for 
the week ending December 5, but this was less than for the same period in 1963. 
Largest increases were reported by California, Missouri, New Jersey, Illinois and 
New York. 

SENIOR CITIZENS are going to make sure that the new 89th Congress is well aware of 
the need for Medicare. More than 1,000 representatives from many states af- 
filiated with the National Council of Senior Citizens will visit Washington at the 
opening of Congress to make their views unmistakably known. 

8 THE CARPENTER 





if* 

r 



Washington, D. C. 
November 24, 1964 



MANDATE 
for ACTION 



Statement by the AFL-CIO Executive Council on Labor's 196$ Legislative Goals 



The will of the people 

has never been more clearly evi- 
dent. 

On November 3, American vot- 
ers overwhelmingly voiced their 
confidence in the social and eco- 
nomic structure that has been built, 
step by step, over the last 32 years. 

They forthrightly rejected a radi- 
cal assault on that structure. 

They decisively proclaimed their 
desire to move on from a good 
present to a great future. 

They gave their mandate to the 
program of progress President John- 
son has called the "Great Society." 

Now it is incumbent upon all 
who joined in that mandate to trans- 
late it into practical reality. 

Basically, this means adapting 
the ideals and aspirations of the 
Founding Fathers of the Republic 
to the America in which we live — 
America in the second half of the 
20th Century. 

The ideals and aspirations have 
not changed. Liberty, equality, op- 
portunity are still the American 
dream. But the nation itself has 
changed to a degree that the wisest 
men of 200 years ago did not and 
could not have conceived. 

The United States has burgeoned 
from a sparse scattering of farms 
and villages along the Atlantic coast 
into a vast urban and industrial 
complex, spanning the continent, 
extending half way across the Pa- 
cific and reaching north beyond the 
Arctic Circle. 

The 2Vi million Americans of 



1776 have become over 190 million 
today. Today's Americans — most 
of them — live in the city, not the 
country. They work in business and 
industry, not on farms. With the 
same unquenchable spirit, the same 
energy and the same ingenuity that 
characterized their forefathers, they 
have made the United States the 
richest and most productive land 
the world has ever known. 

But for too many Americans this 
wealth and this production is a re- 
mote ideal. They do not share in 
it; they live in misery and want. 

More than one in five of Ameri- 
ca's families suffer the indignities 
of unemployment, poverty and 
slums. America's major problem, 
unemployment, remains unsolved, 
despite the record 46 months of 
continuing rise of economic activi- 
ties. 

These ugly aspects of our social 
order will not simply disappear by 
the wave of a magic wand. Indeed, 
there is a danger that they can 
fester and poison our entire society. 

The rising demands of our youth, 
of Negroes and of disadvantaged 
Americans of all races and creeds 
for jobs and economic opportunity 
cry out for positive responses. This 
is our challenge. 

Today we have the opportunity 
to meet that challenge, to take, in 
1965, a giant step forward on the 
road to a society that will enable 
all our citizens to realize their full 
potential. And this giant step for- 
ward can be taken through enact- 



ment of the measures the AFL- 
CIO has long urged. 

These are not novel measures. 
They are not visionary measures. 
They are practical, down-to-earth 
measures. 

They are far less revolutionary 
than the idea upon which this na- 
tion was built — the idea that "all 
men are created equal." Yet they 
are essential if the goals of 1776 
are to be realized today. 

The only requirements are the 
courage, determination and imagi- 
nation to support what needs to be 
done; to make a massive investment 
in America, one that this nation's 
immense productive potential can 
take in stride, one that truly brings 
within reach an end to poverty and 
deprivation in our time. 

Let us first summarize our goals. 

• We believe in the total elimi- 
nation of poverty in America. 

• We believe that this requires, 
first, jobs at good wages for all who 
are able and willing to work; and, 
second, a social insurance program 
that protects young and old alike 
from the economic hazards which 
are no fault of their own. 

• We believe in full and equal 
opportunity, full and equal rights, 
for every American in every phase 
of life, regardless of race, creed, 
color or national origin. 

• We believe this equality can 
be brought about only if there is 
full employment. 

• We believe that free collective 
bargaining is an indispensable ele- 



JANUARY, 1965 



merit in the search for economic 
justice and personal liberty for 
workers. 

• YVc believe in the wise use of 
America's riches to create a richer 
life for all Americans. 

• We believe that government, 
the instrument of the people, should 
use its powers to attack and to solve 
the people's problems. 

• We believe that progress to- 
ward these goals can be made in 
the 1965 session of the Congress 
by the measures set forth below. 

Legislative Goals 
Listed By Council 

AFL-CIO Pres. George Meany told 
a news conference at the conclusion 
of the one-day council meeting in 
Washington (when the preceding state- 
ment was issued), that the first priority 
in the program will be to restore free 
collective bargaining by seeking re- 
peal of Sec. 14b of the Taft-Hartley 
Act, which allows states to enact so- 
called "right-to-work" laws. 

In addition to the No. 1 priority to 
repeal Sec. 14b of the Taft-Hartley 
Act, the council called for action to: 

• Eliminate inequities and resolve 
contradictions in the nation's basic la- 
bor-management law. 

• Provide a national hospital insur- 
ance system based on social security 
principles for those over 65, increase 
social security benefits, establish a fed- 
eral system of reinsurance for all pri- 
vate pension plans, enact federal stand- 
ards to improve the unemployment 
compensation system. 

• Cover all workers under the min- 
imum wage law and increase the wage 
to $2 an hour; cut the standard work- 
week to 35 hours and provide for 
double time pay for overtime. 

• Aid elementary and secondary 
schools to help them meet all needs, 
including construction; provide sub- 
stantial federal aid to schools serving 
children from low-income areas; give 
comprehensive assistance to college 
students; aid the growth of community 
junior colleges with additional funds. 

• Promote urban renewal and aid 
low-cost public housing as well as 
housing for those of moderate income; 
appropriate adequate funds for mass 
transit; establish a Department of 
Housing and Community Affairs in 
the Cabinet. 

• Continue and expand federal 
grants for community facilities, includ- 
ing air and water pollution, highways, 
hospitals, health facilities and airports. 



• Advance the concept of regional 
planning set out in the Applachia pro- 
gram in handling the problem of de- 
pressed areas, and provide a new fed- 
eral initiative in the conservation and 
development of natural resources. 

• Provide for grants and loans for 
community mental health centers, di- 
rect service group practice plans, mod- 
ernization of existing hospitals and aid 
for students in the health professions. 

• Appropriate more funds for the 
anti-poverty program, specifically the 
Equal Opportunities Act and the Man- 
power Development & Training Act. 

• Eliminate excise taxes on goods 
and services generally used by all 
Americans, close tax loop holes, revise 
the tax system to ease the burden on 
low-income groups and to prevent "the 
indiscriminate rebate of federal taxes 
to the states with no restrictions on 
the use of such funds." 

• Enact legislation to protect the 
consumer on installment buying, pack- 
aging, drugs, and create a federal con- 
sumer information service; guard 
against all forms of "fair trade" laws. 

• Prevent importation of Mexican 
farm laborers and improve the condi- 
tions of migratory farm labor by in- 
cluding them under national labor and 
social insurance laws. 

• Continue support for trade ex- 




pansion if a mechanism to protect 
workers and businesses adversely af- 
fected can be made to work; incor- 
porate fair labor standards in world 
trade; continue support for foreign aid 
programs; use American flag ships in 
transporting aid projects. 

Meany told reporters at the news 
conference that Labor Sec. W. Willard 
Wirtz had spent an hour with the 
council discussing legislation in the up- 
coming Congress. He characterized 
the discussion as "very good." 

In answer to queries, Meany said 
that in addition to correcting an in- 
equity in national labor law. repeal 
of 14b and therefore state "right-to- 
work" laws would affect the economy 
of the states where they exist, states 
marked by low wages, a high degree 
of poverty and other problems. 

And on the reported proposal to 
give federal funds to the states with- 
out qualification, Meany said the AFL- 
CIO is flatly opposed to the plan and 



had made its views known to Pres. 
Johnson. The federation, he said, is 
not against federal help for the states 
but is opposed to "giving them funds 
without strings." 

The federation president told re- 
porters that before his death Pres. 
Kennedy indicated the proposal for a 
shorter workweek required more study 
and appeared to be changing his posi- 
tion of opposition. Pres. Johnson and 
Sec. Wirtz have the same approach 
currently, Meany said. He added that 
he believes that a shorter workweek is 
"inevitable" in the face of changing 



AFL-CIO, President 
Discuss Key Issues 

Organized labor presented its views 
to Pres. Johnson "on everything under 
the sun," AFL-CIO Pres. George 
Meany told reporters following a two- 
hour meeting at the White House. 

Meany said he and other federation 
officials had met with the President 
and his key aides to discuss all the 
problems facing the nation and all leg- 
islation proposed to overcome them. 

"We discussed in particular the long- 
term problem of unemployment," he 
said, noting that while increases in the 
gross national product over the past 
year had helped cut joblessness some- 
what, it still remains at about 5 percent. 

The labor officials, Meany said, also 
voiced their concern over the possibil- 
ity of a slackening in the nation's eco- 
nomic growth during the next year and 
stressed the need to find employment 
and educational opportunities for the 
3.8 million young people who will 
reach the age of 18 over the year — an 
increase of a million over 1964. 

The AFL-CIO position urging repeal 
of Section 14b of the Taft-Hartley Act, 
which permits states to outlaw union 
shop agreements, was another subject 
of discussion, the federation president 
said. 

In response to questions, he said the 
President had indicated his support for 
the Democratic Party platform, which 
calls for repeal of Section 14b, but 
Meany stressed that the AFL-CIO offi- 
cials had not come to the meeting "to 
seek commitments" or "to reach agree- 
ment," but to discuss problems which 
concern labor and the nation. 

The White House later reported that 
among other subjects taken up were 
manpower, the labor force, hospital in- 
surance for the aged, excise taxes, the 
anti-poverty program, aid to the Appa- 
lachian region, area redevelopment, 
and the impact of automation. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 




EDITORIALS 



* HOUSE HUNTING FOR A V. P. 

Why must every Vice-President-Elect of the United 
States have to go house hunting when he is elected to 
the second highest office in the land? 

Why is there no official residence for the U. S. 
Vice President, just as there is a White House for the 
President? . . . and a mansion for each state gover- 
nor? . . . and, for that matter, a home for every 
admiral? 

These questions popped up in Washington, last 
month, as Vice-President-Elect Hubert Humphrey be- 
gan looking for a house larger and most suitable 
than the modest home in which he lived while serving 
as a U. S. Senator from Minnesota. Mr. Humphrey 
is not a wealthy man, as his financial statement dur- 
ing the recent political campaign showed. How much 
can he afford? 

It's high time all this uncertainty about a vice 
president's residence is eliminated. 

A bill is scheduled for introduction in the current 
session of Congress which calls for the establishment 
of a suitable permanent official residence for the Vice 
President of the United States. We wholeheartedly 
urge its adoption. 

* THE KENNEDY SPECULATORS 

More than 160 million Kennedy half dollars were 
produced by U. S. mints last year in memory of the 
President who captured the imagination of the world 
before his tragic death. How many have you received 
in change? 

Probably not very many. Some of us have yet to 
hold our first Kennedy coin. Although a few have 
taken their place in cherished private collections, the 
great majority seem to have disappeared into a mon- 
strous, groaning maw of commercialism, to become 
pawns of financial gain. 

On the first anniversary of Kennedy's assassination, 
a Times Square curio shop in New York brazenly 
advertised in its window: "Sale! Collector's Item. 
Kennedy Half Dollar. 88c" 

Locked away in vaults, where they are expected 
to return many cents on the dollar, in time, are the 
speculator's Kennedy heads. Encased in plastic, bound 
up in silver bezels, pinioned on key chains and brace- 
lets are the promoter's and the cheap merchandiser's 



Kennedy heads. They have found their way into so 
many geegaws and gimcracks that even the most in- 
sensitive have begun to cry for a stop. 

The place where the majority of Kennedy coins 
belongs is with the people — circulating, changing 
hands, performing useful work as a tool of com- 
merce — and at the same time serving as a living 
memorial to the late President. They can't be seen 
in the vaults. They do no work dangling at the 
end of a key chain. 

Whenever a coin is issued by the U. S. Treasury, 
with emotional ties like this one, there should be a 
limit to the number of such coins which may be 
bought up in wholesale lots by speculators ... Or 
coin should not be produced until time has eased 
the public conscience. 

* DOCTORS AGAINST MEDICARE 

The American Medical Association has renewed its 
war against the Administration's program to provide 
health care for the aged under Social Security. That is, 
of course, its right; but it stops being right when the 
association pretends that what it is fighting is "the in- 
vasion of voluntary relationship between the patient 
and the physician." 

Nothing in the medicare plan interferes in any way 
with patient-doctor relationships. All that is proposed 
is a Federal insurance system to help elderly persons 
pay the cost of hospital and nursing care. Each per- 
son would have the same freedom he now has to 
choose his physician or hospital. The Government 
would have no supervision or control over the prac- 
tice of medicine by any doctor. It would have no new 
voice in hospital administration or operation. 

President Johnson and the Democratic party, with 
its strengthened majority in the new Congress, have 
assigned medicare a top position on their 1965 legis- 
lative priority list. If the A.M.A. questions the pro- 
gram's financial soundness, it can serve the cause of 
good health best by putting forward its ideas on how 
an adequate insurance system ought to operate. It 
makes no useful contribution by continuing to suggest 
that "the foundation of the nation's protection against 
disease and suffering" will crumble if the aged have a 
dependable instrument for helping to pay their hospital 
bills. 

Editorial, New York Times, December 3, 1964 



JANUARY, 1965 



11 




'SKY HOOK' GOING UP— The big Vee-Balloon is reeled 
into the air prior to the first demonstration of its use for 
logging at Reedsport, Oregon. 

Giant V-shaped balloon eliminates 
need for logging roads in many areas 




Faye Stewart, 
president of 
Flying Scotsman, 
Inc., Eugene, 
Oregon, left, has 
been named 
exclusive U.S. 
distributor of the 
balloons. 



t >*a 



A 




Two logs, 
weighing more 
than a ton, can be 
seen at the lower 
center of the 
picture at left, as 
they move swiftly 
over several 
hundred feet of 
rugged terrain 
toward the metal 
spar tree in the 
foreground. 



THE 

LOG-LIFTING 

BALLOON 

I N THE NEAR FUTURE, logging timber in extremely 
rough terrain may become relatively simple. 

The Goodyear Aerospace Corporation of Akron, Ohio, 
has come up with a revolutionary method of logging tim- 
ber. The helium-filled balloon "skyhook" was built to 
quickly move tons of heavy logs over long distances 
through rugged terrain. The use of this 75,000-cubic- 
foot Vee-Balloon, as it is called, has been proposed as 
an alternative to building costly logging roads and as a 
means of preventing soil erosion conditions caused by 
present logging procedures. 

At a demonstration at the Bohemia Lumber Company, 
Culp Creek, Oregon, R. W. Richardson, vice president of 
Goodyear Aerospace, reported that 'a four-week period 
of intensive testing in areas with deep canyons and side 
draws had proved the feasibility of logging such areas 
with balloons. He said that balloon logging promises sub- 
stantial savings in the cost of clearing these areas and 
also opens new vistas for logging areas currently con- 
sidered inaccessible or too costly to log. 

The highly stable Vee-Balloon, originally designed for 
carrying scientific instruments to high altitudes for long 
periods of time, is made up of two 110-foot, cigar-shaped 
balloons joined at the nose. A large horizontal fin joins 
the two sections at the tail. Vertical tailfins on each side 
aid in providing stability. 

In the demonstration, a cable from the helium-filled 
balloon — flying at an altitude of approximately 500 feet 
— was attached to a log. The operator of a power winch 
and a metal spar tree then slackened one line connecting 
the winch with the balloon, permitting it to rise slightly, 
thus lifting one end of the heavy log clear of the ground. 
A power-driven tow line then pulled the log and its 
unwieldy load into a clearing for loading into a truck. 

Development of the balloon system promises to lower 
logging costs and greatly increase the lumber industry's 
potential timber harvest throughout the world. In order 
to utilize fully a greater percentage of the mature tim- 
ber the industry had to find methods to log the less ac- 
cessible and more difficult areas. In Alaska, current 
logging methods can reach to elevations of only a few 
hundred feet and are limited to slope distances of 1,000 
feet or less. 

Recognizing the potentials of balloon logging, the U.S. 
Forest Service early this year awarded to Goodyear Aero- 
space a two-phase contract to study the feasibility and 
economics of balloon logging. It is considering the possi- 
bility of utilizing a new balloon almost twice the size 
of the one already demonstrated for tests in southeastern 
Alaska, where millions of board feet of lumber are uncut 
because they are inaccessible with present methods of 
operation. 

A Goodyear executive announced that logging balloons 
and a complete system of winching and rigging equipment 
needed for the operation would be made available for 
loggers as soon as the development program is completed. 
He said Goodyear Aerospace had named Flying Scots- 
man, Inc., of Eugene, Ore., as exclusive distributor for the 
logging balloons in the United States. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 




SHAPE 
AMERICA'S 

-FUTURE- 



APPRENTICESHIP 

A Restatement of Brotherhood Policy 



A misunderstanding seems to exist as to the policy of 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners of 
America relating to certain aspects of the apprenticeship 
program. 

In order to clarify the position of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters & Joiners of America, the following 
is a restatement of policy concerning the: 

• Issuance of Clearances to Apprentices 

• Runaway Apprentices 

• Acceptance of Overage Apprentices 

• Eligibility for the Brotherhood Journeyman 
Certificate 

CLEARANCE: Under no circumstances is a clearance 
to be given to an apprentice unless such a clearance has 
been requested by a Local Union or District Council in 
the area to which the apprentice desires to transfer. 

If an apprentice requests a clearance he should be told 
that it cannot be granted until he has initiated a request 
through the Local Union or District Council in the area 
where he desires to transfer. 

An apprentice should be encouraged to complete his 
apprenticeship in the area where he was accepted. How- 
ever, there are extenuating circumstances such as health, 
transfer or moving of family or lack of work, that would 
justify a clearance. 

RUNAWAY APPRENTICES: Occasionally an appren- 
tice will leave an area, move to another and join as a 
journeyman. This can be done only by falsification of his 
application for membership. Either he states he has 
never been a member of the Brotherhood before or 
else he claims credit for prior experience which cannot 
be substantiated. 

In either case the apprentice is subjecting himself to 
disciplinary action which could lead to disbarment from 



membership in the United Brotherhood of Carpenters & 
Joiners of America. 

The General Office now has an alphabetical listing 
of the membership of our Brotherhood. If any financial 
secretary or Joint Apprenticeship Committee has reason 
to believe that an apprentice has made application and 
joined another Local Union as a journeyman, they should 
initiate an inquiry through the First General Vice Presi- 
dent's office to determine the membership status of the 
apprentice in question. If upon verification it is found 
that the ineligible apprentice has joined elsewhere as a 
journeyman, the appropriate action will be taken im- 
mediately. 

OVERAGE APPRENTICES: The General Constitution 
provides that an applicant for apprenticeship must be 
between the age of 17 through 25. In the case of those 
serving in the Armed Forces, however, the upper age 
limit is extended to an applicant's 31st birthday. Appli- 
cants 26 years of age or over who have not served in 
the Armed Forces can only be admitted as apprentices 
by special dispensation from the General President. Com- 
mittees making a request for such special consideration 
of an applicant must submit justifying information to 
substantiate such' a request. 

JOURNEYMAN CERTIFICATES: Many local Unions 
and Joint Apprenticeship Committees seem to have the 
impression that an apprentice must serve a full four 
years under the Brotherhood Program. This is not 
correct. 

If an applicant is accepted for apprenticeship and given 
credit for prior experience, he is eligible for the Brother- 
hood Journeyman Certificate, providing he successfully 
completes the remainder of his apprenticeship under a 
recognized program and the issuance of the Journeyman 
Certificate is requested and recommended by the local 
Union or District Council having jurisdiction. 



JANUARY, 1965 



13 





LEFT: < <nmiiiioM.il wrench, used here 
under actual no-gravity conditions, with 
the astronaut Moiitiii^ upside down, is al- 
most totally useless. BELOW: All-pur- 
pose ratchet tool, developed for the U.S. 
moon program, satislics many needs. 



LEFT: In simulated spaceworld, an en- 
gineer shows how a power tool can be 
used for external vehicle repair. 




Tools for the Space Frontier 



INSIDE the equipment-jammed in- 
terior of a spaceship bound for the 
moon, a piece of equipment begins to 
"act up." One of the astronauts knows 
instinctively what is wrong. He reaches 
into a box of peculiar tools, grasps 
one firmly, and unbuckles his seat 
harness. The fun begins. 

With the vehicle spinning out into 
the cold darkness of interplanetary 
space, there is no gravity. The velocity 
of the vehicle just matches the pull 
of the various heavenly bodies, and 
nothing has any weight. 

A gentle push against a bulkhead 
propels the astronaut down a passage- 
way to the faulty black box. Floating 
in the artificial atmosphere of the com- 
partment, there is no upside down or 
rightside up. Once something is set 
in motion it keeps going until it is 
snubbed — or crashes — to a stop. 

If our astronaut were using an earth- 
ling's tool, strange things would hap- 
pen. An attempt to loosen a nut with 
a wrench would generate a reaction, 
in the direction opposite to the applied 
force. The astronaut, straining against 
the nut, would spin around the bolt. 

But clenched in our space man's 
hand is a different kind of tool, spe- 
cially designed for use in zero gravity. 
It looks much like a power drill. The 
astronaut puts the socket in place over 
a nut, squeezes the trigger, and the 



tool spins the nut out easily while the 
astronaut remains motionless. 

Without such specially-designed 
tools, it would be almost impossible 
for space travelers to handle the 
maintenance and repair work which 
is essential to successful completion of 
the mission — and survival — during 
long space trips. 

The tool used by our spaceman for 
his hypothetical repair actually exists. 
It is called a power Zert, which is 
short for Zero Reaction Tool. Proto- 
types have been used under actual 
zero-gravity conditions. 

There are many other space tools 
now being designed and tested for the 
U.S. Man-in-space program. A com- 
bination of wrench and pliers, called a 
Plench, has been developed for the 
Aerospace Medical Research Labora- 
tories at Wright-Patterson Air Force 
Base. It translates a pliers-like squeeze 
into a no-reaction rotation of a nut 
socket, or alternate tool bits. 

The space repairman's dictionary is 
already filled with the strange jargon of 
these new tools. Zerts come in many 
shapes. In addition to the powered 
one provided for our interstellar Mr. 
Fxit, there are hand-operated Zerts 
which perform a number of jobs on 
the same basic principle of the Plench. 
A squeeze turns a ratcheted working 
bit. A Spammer — for Space Hammer 



— is a spring-loaded device which op- 
erates much like a riveter's gun. Spun- 
fits are two-part wrenches designed 
for loosening and tightening couplings. 

It sounds as if the sharp space engi- 
neers have the whole tool problem 
under control, but there are still many 
facets of the development program 
which have them puzzled. 

One is the immobility of man in the 
pressure suits required for work out- 
side the space ship, where the almost 
total vacuum would explode a human 
body and the temperature would al- 
most instantly freeze it. To try out 
suits and tools, engineer George Hanff. 
of Lockheed California Corp., strapped 
himself into an outlandish swivelling 
standup rack, which permits very free 
movement in almost any direction. It 
simulates the anchorless condition of 
the human body under zero-gravity 
conditions about as closely as can be 
done on earth. 

Performing work on a full-scale 
mock-up of a biological satellite, Hanff 
found such jobs as removing and re- 
placing power cables took up to five 
times longer than on earth. The pres- 
sure suit restricted body movements, 
particularly at the arm, head and leg 
joints. Air pressure in his gloves "made 
my fingers like sausages," he reported. 

Other scientists, working for the Air 
(Continued on page 37) 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



What would 

happen if 

George Washington 

were a young 

fellow today and 

the cherry tree 

incident took place? 



One top authority thinks 
young George would end up 
before a lie detector, since this 
seems to be the way such things 
go these days, especially in in- 
dustry and government. 

Col. Maurice Levin, J.A.G.C. 
(ret.), writing in The Police 
Chief, official publication of the 
Chiefs of Police, Inc., thinks 
the fabled incident would have 
developed as follows: 




It was late afternoon of a 
crisp February 12 in Virginia. 
Mother Washington was in her 
dressing room debating which of 
32 instant hairset sprays to ap- 
ply to her hair before dinner 
at the Custis's. The radio was 
turned on low, and occasionally 
a song broke through the ad- 
vertising. 

Father Washington came in, 
pecked his wife on her cheek, 
and said, "What's for dinner?" 

Mother explained they were 
going to the Custis's, where the 
food was always bad but the 
liquor was always good, so 
Father started to get ready. 

As he was deciding which of 
42 pre-shave lotions to use, 
Mother Washington said, 
"Father, you're going to have 
to do something about George. 
He just sawed down your favor- 
ite cherry tree with the chain 
saw you gave him for his birth- 
day." 

Father Washington turned to 
her with mouth agape and said, 
"No, I don't believe it." 

"Well," said Mother Wash- 
ington, "he told me he did." 

"I still don't believe it," said 
Father, "but I'll speak to him 
right now." 

Father found George in his 
bedroom, reading "Conquest in 
Europe." George glanced up at 
the intrusion, but managed to 
say, "Hi, Dad." 

"George," said Father, 
"Mother tells me you cut down 
my favorite cherry tree." 

"Yes, Father, I did. I cannot 
tell a lie." 

"I can't believe it, George, I 
really can't." 

"Well, it's true, Father, I hope 
you won't punish me too much." 

"Punish you? Not at all. I 
think you're trying to protect 
someone else, so will you agree 
to take a lie detector examina- 
tion?" 

"Oh, no, Father. What's the 
use? I tell you I cut the tree 
down. That's the truth." 

So, the next morning, Father 
Washington kept George out of 
school and, after some persua- 



sion, took him down to see a 
private investigator who ran a 
polygraph service. The office in 
which he kept his polygraph 
instrument was as immaculate 
and orderly as an operating 
room, and his equipment was 
of the best. 

Father convinced George he 
should take the examination, but 
George, as can well be under- 
stood, was still somewhat con- 
cerned, because he really had 
cut down the tree. And he was 
missing a very interesting ses- 
sion at school dealing with 
the Korean Truce Talks. But, 
George was a good boy, and he 
was determined to obey his 
father, no matter how hurt and 
annoyed he might feel. 

After Father Washington told 
his story to the polygraph ex- 
aminer, the examiner sat George 
down and told him about the 
instrument, how it worked, and 
explained in detail how the 
examination would be given. 
George wriggled impatiently, but 
listened politely. The examiner 
went over the questions he 
would ask George, and when he 
was satisfied that George under- 
stood what was to happen, and 
seemed to be relaxed, he ap- 
plied the various attachments of 
the polygraph instrument to 
George. 

At the conclusion of the ex- 
amination, the attachments were 
removed from George, and the 
operator took the graphic chart 
or record of the examination 
out of the machine and George 
walked out of the room, to greet 
an expectant Father Washing- 
ton. 

"Well," said Father. 

"There is a positive indica- 
tion," said the examiner in for- 
mal tones, "that George may 
be deceiving you and that he 
didn't cut the tree down." 
- And George was whipped for 
telling a lie. 

Col. Levin believes that this 
is not a far-fetched story — that 
lie detectors can lie. 

— Press Associates. 



JANUARY, 1965 



15 




"If a man does not keep 
pace with his companions, 
perhaps it is because he 
hears a different drummer. 
Let him step to the music 
which he hears, however 
measured or far away." 

— Henry David Thoreau 



Fm not very good in school . 



REPRINTED FROM 

THE SPECIALTY WORKER 

"This is the day and age when 
we shoot a man around the world 
in 90 minutes and photograph the 
moon 500 feet from its surface 
before impact eight miles from a 
selected target," says Frederick T. 
Sullivan, secretary-treasurer of the 
Printing Pressmen, "Yet, we cannot 
understand or solve our sociologi- 
cal problems here in our own 
country or on this planet. 

"We all cannot go to the moon 
or take part in these exciting proj- 
ects. Some of us have to be able 
to make tailgates and do the less 
glamorous jobs that must be done 
in this world. Our educators must 
be able to be on the same wave 
length with these young people 
to show them that when they do 
meaningful work and are able to 
enjoy it. they are making a valu- 
able contribution to our society." 

So saying, he passed on to the 
editor of The Specialty Worker 
the teenager's story reprinted here. 
It was given to him by the presi- 
dent of Chabot College, Hayward, 
California. We now offer it to you. 



'T'HIS is my second year in the seventh grade and I'm 
bigger and taller than the other kids. They like me al- 
right, though, even if I don't say much in the classroom, 
because outside I can tell them how to do a lot of things. 
They tag me around and that sort of makes up for what 
goes on in school. 

I don't know why the teachers don't like me. They 
never have very much. Seems like they don't think you 
know anything unless they can name the book it comes out 
of. I've got a lot of books in my room at home — books like 
Popular Science, Mechanical Encyclopedia, and the mail 
order catalogues — but I don't very often just sit clown and 
read them through like they make us do in school. I use my 
books when I want to find something out, like whenever 
Mom buys something secondhand I look it up in Sears' or 
Ward's first and tell her if she's getting stung or not. I can 
use the index in a hurry. 

In school, though, we've got to learn whatever is in the 
book and I just can't memorize the stuff. Last year I stayed 
after school every night for two weeks trying to learn the 
names of the Presidents. Of course, I knew some of them 
like Washington and Jefferson and Lincoln, but there must 
have been 30 altogether, and I never did get them straight. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



I'm not too sorry though, be- 
cause the kids who learned the 
Presidents had to turn right around 
and learn all the Vice Presidents. 
I am taking the seventh grade over, 
but our teacher this year isn't so 
interested in the names of the Presi- 
dents. She has us trying to learn 
the names of all the great American 
inventors. 

I GUESS I just can't remember 
names in history. Anyway, this year 
I've been trying to learn about 
trucks because my uncle owns three 
and he says I can drive one when 
I'm sixteen. I already know the 
horsepower and number of forward 
and backward speeds of 26 Ameri- 
can trucks, some of them diesels, 
and I can spot each make a long 
way off. It's funny how that diesel 
works. I started to tell my teacher 
about it last Wednesday in science 
class when the pump we were using 
to make a vacuum in a bell jar got 
hot, but she said she didn't see 
what a diesel engine had to do with 
our experiment on air pressure so 
I just kept still. The kids seemed 
interested though. I took four of 
them around to my uncle's garage 
after school and we saw the me- 
chanic, Gus, tear a big truck diesel 
down. Boy, does he know his stuff! 

I'm not very good in geography 
either. They call it economic geog- 
raphy this year. We've been study- 
ing the imports and exports of Chile 
all week, but I couldn't tell you 
what they are. Maybe the reason 
is I had to miss school yesterday 
because my uncle took me and his 
big trailer truck down state about 
200 miles, and we brought almost 
10 tons of stock to the Chicago 
market. 

He had told me where we were 
going, and I had to figure out the 
highways to take and also the mile- 
age. He didn't do anything but drive 
and turn where I told him to. Was 
that fun! I sat with a map in my 
lap and told him to turn south, or 
southeast, or some other direction. 
We made seven stops, and drove 
over 500 miles round trip. I'm fig- 
uring now what his oil cost, and 
also the wear and tear on the 
truck — he calls it depreciation — so 
we'll know how much we made. 

I even write out all the bills and 



send letters to the farmers about 
what their pigs and beef cattle 
brought at the stockyards. I only 
made three mistakes in 17 letters 
last time, my aunt said, all commas. 
She's been through high school and 
reads them over. I wish I could 
write school themes that way. The 
last one I had to write was on, 
"What a Daffodil Thinks of Spring," 
and I just couldn't get going. 

I didn't do very well in school in 
arithmetic either. Seems I just can't 
keep my mind on the problems. 
We had one the other day like this: 
"If a 57-foot telephone pole 
falls across a cement highway 
so that 17 3/6 feet extend from 
one side and 14 9/17 feet the 
other, how wide is the high- 
way?" 

That seemed to me like an aw- 
fully silly way to get the width of a 
highway. I didn't even try to answer 
it because it didn't say whether the 
pole had fallen straight across or 
not. 

EVEN IN SHOP I didn't get very 
good grades. All of us kids made 
a broom holder and a bookend this 
term and mine were sloppy. I just 
couldn't get interested. Mom doesn't 
use a broom anymore with her new 
vacuum cleaner, and all our books 
are in a bookcase with glass doors in 
the parlor. Anyway, I wanted to 



make an end gate for my uncle's 
trailer, but the shop teacher said 
that meant using metal and wood 
both, and I'd have to learn how to 
work with wood first. I didn't see 
why, but I kept still and made a 
tie rack at school and the tail gate 
after school at my uncle's garage. 
He said I saved him ten dollars. 

Civics is hard for me, too. I've 
been staying after school trying to 
learn the "Articles of Confedera- 
tion" for almost a week, because 
the teacher said we couldn't be 
good citizens unless we did. I really 
tried, because I want to be a good 
citizen. I did hate to stay after 
school, though, because a bunch of 
us boys from the south end of town 
have been cleaning up the old lot 
across from Taylor's Machine Shop 
to make a playground out of it for 
the little kids from the Methodist 
home. I made the jungle gym from 
old pipe, and the guys made me 
Grand Mogul to keep the play- 
ground going. We raised enough 
money collecting scrap this month 
to build a wire fence clear around 
the lot. 

Dad says I can quit school when 
I am fifteen, and I am sort of anxi- 
ous to because there are a lot of 
things I want to learn how to do, 
and as my uncle says, I'm not get- 
ting any younger. 



,. . ._ - . • - ; 







JANUARY. 1965 



17 




Which size Savings Bond you should buy... and why 



1 . Starter size for steady savers. Small enough 
to be habit-forming; big enough to count up 
fast. Ideal gift. Worth $25 at maturity; sells for 
only $18.75. 

2. Increasingly popular size and very big with 
Payroll Savers. Only $9 weekly buys one a 
month comfortably. Worth $50 at maturity; 
sells for only $37.50. 

3. Brand-new size. For people who want to buy 
more than a $50 Bond but not quite a $100 one. 
It's worth $75 when it matures in 7% years. 
Sells for just $56.25. 

4. If you're in a hurry to build up savings, this 
one's tailor-made. Buy one a month for 5 years 
and you'll have $4,856. Each is worth $100 at 
maturity; sells for only $75. 

5. Perfect for bonuses, tax refunds and other 
windfalls. Grows into a tidy nest egg of $200 at 
maturity; costs only $150. 

6. For big-time savers . . . and small investors. 
You get guaranteed interest, excellent security. 




And your money's available when you need it. 
Worth $500 at maturity; sells for only $375. 

7. This one's fine for part of an insurance 
settlement. Worth $1,000 at maturity; sells for 
only $750. 

8. Good place for reserve funds — for bus- 
inesses, pension funds, credit unions, and other 
institutions except commercial banks. Good for 
you, too, when you happen to have $7500. 



Quick facts about 
Series E Savings Bonds 

• You get back $4 for every $3 at maturity 

• You pay no state or local tax and can defer 
the federal tax until the Bonds are cashed 

• Your Bonds are replaced free if lost, 
destroyed or stolen 

• You can get your money when you need it 

Buy E Bonds for growth — 
H Bonds for current income 



Help yourself while you help your country 

BUY U.S. SAVINGS BONDS 

This advertising is donated by The Advertising Council and this magazine. 



w 



Letters to the Editor 
Cover Many Subjects 

In the course of a busy month, the 
editor of The Carpenter receives many- 
letters from readers. Some take us to 
task for our viewpoints. Some, occa- 
sionally, call attention to errors. 
Others comment on articles we have 
published and offer additional infor- 
mation. Here are three of several re- 
ceived in recent weeks: 
Sirs, or Madam: 

A correction, if needed, for page 16 
of the December '64 issue of The 
Carpenter. In case anyone should 
question the address of St. Mary's 
Academy, which is attended by Cecelia 
Meyer. 

The Academy is located in Prairie 
due Chien, Wisconsin. Cecelia lives 
there during the school term, and re- 
turns home to Buffalo Grove, Illinois, 
during vacation time. And since Buf- 
falo Grove does not have a post office, 
we use the Prairie View, Illinois, post 
office service for the mailing address. 

Mrs. V. B. Meyer, 
Prairie View. 111. 

Mrs. Meyer refers to a letter pub- 
lished with the article "Carpentry 
Geometry Revisited," and we apolo- 
gize for the error. 

• 
Editor, Carpenters Journal: 

In your last magazine you mis- 
spelled a word and made a mistate- 
ment. In the article about old car- 
penter tools, you had FROW; it is 
spelled FROE. And you said you hit 
it with your right hand. You should 
have a mallet made out of a short 
length of a hickory limb or tree about 
14 inches long. About half of it be- 
ing shaved down for a hand hold. 
The piece should be about 4 inches in 
diameter, that is used to hit back of 
froe to start it to split your blocks 
with. 

I lived in Arkansas seven years and 
made enough shakes or roof boards to 
cover a house 14 x 28 and a barn 
24 x 36, so I know whereof I speak. 

I joined the union February 28, 
1918; am now retired on the pension. 
I am 86 years old. I have some old 
tools that you have not pictured yet. 
One is a plow plane with wooden 
screw adjustments sideways. 

I put three squares of roofing on 
my own house last January. 

W. G. Wilson, 
Coachella, Calif. 
Brother Wilson refers to the article 
on Ancient Carpentry Tools, Pages 
19, 20, and 21 of our November issue. 



TIMBERS PROVE THEIR WORTH 
IN OLD CHICAGO BREAKWATER 



CHICAGO, ILL. — Twentieth 
century progress has uncovered a 
long-buried chapter from the color- 
ful past of Chicago and the Illi- 
nois Central Railroad. 

Workmen excavating at the site 
of the future Grant Park under- 
ground garage recently unearthed 
part of a breakwater built of wood- 
en pilings more than a century ago 
when Lake Michigan's waters 
lapped at the foot of Michigan 
Avenue. 

The charred condition of the 
timbers raised speculation that the 
breakwater may have been parti- 
ally burned in the Chicago Fire of 
1871. It was made of logs, driven 
into the ground as pilings, and 
joined by cross members. 

After the fire the city permitted 
the railroad to use debris from the 
remains of 15,768 buildings to fill 
the area from Michigan Avenue to 
its trestle. This aided in stabiliz- 
ing the lake's shore. 

The Illinois Central later built 
two breakwaters flanking the trestle 
supporting its tracks across the 
lake from 12th Street to Randolph. 

Studies show that in 1821 the 
Lake Michigan shoreline lay half- 
way between Michigan Avenue and 
the present Illinois Central tracks. 
By 1869 the shoreline was right 
against Michigan Avenue. 

— Reprinted with permission from 
the Illinois Central Magazine, 
Illinois Central Railroad 






f«wM 











Remains of century-old breakwater pro- 
vide sharp contrast framed against Chi- 
cago's modern skyline. 




The breakwater as it appeared from Michigan Avenue in photo from 1850s. 
Illinois Central trestle may be seen in background. The structure was un- 
covered about 10 feet below street level in recent excavation. 



JANUARY, 1965 



19 



'Right-To-Work' 
Took Licking In 



WASHINGTON — Wherever the 
so-called "right-to-work" was an issue 
in the November election, it took a 
bad beating, according to the National 
Council for Industrial Peace. 

In fact, so sharp was the licking that 
the anti-"Right-to-Work" organization 
has suggested that the increased liberal 
strength in Congress may open the 
way for repeal of Section 14(b) of 
Taft-Hartley, the section that makes 
the compulsory open shop possible on 
the state level. 

Analyzing results of the election, the 
Council declared that in most indus- 
trial states opposition to "right-to- 
work" candidates who supported the 
Goldwater ticket had an important 
impact on election races. 

"In Montana." the Council said, 
"the issue was important to the legis- 
lative race and brought about a revolu- 
tion in the control of the Montana 
Senate and House of Representatives. 
The same was true in New Mexico, 
Wyoming, Utah, Indiana and Penn- 
sylvania." 

The labor vote turnout on the 
"work" issue was especially heavy in 
the large industrial states, the Council 
reported. Indiana, which in the 1960 
election supported Richard Nixon, 
went heavily Democratic. This was 
also the case in Pennsylvania, where 
a "right-to-work" law has been pushed 
by the National Right to Work Com- 
mittee for the past two years; in Ohio, 
which defeated a "right-to-work" law 
in 1958 by a million votes, and in 
industrial Michigan. 

Every state in which a "right-to- 
work" law has been pushed also re- 
turned large majorities for President 
Johnson. This included Maine, Ver- 
mont, Delaware, Kentucky, Oklahoma, 
Montana, New Mexico, California and 
Washington. 

In Vermont, Richard Snelling, Re- 
publican candidate for Lieutenant 
Governor, ran as a "Right-to-Worker," 
but the issue swept him down to defeat. 
Snelling, president of Shelburne Indus- 
tries of Burlington, has been a long- 
time supporter of so-called "right-to- 
work" legislation. 

In California, Governor Pat Brown 
issued strong warnings to the Califor- 
nia electorate during the campaign that 
a Goldwater victory would mean im- 
position of the so-called "right-to- 
work" law on that industrial state. 
Voters there rejected a "right-to-work" 



Supporters 
November 



proposal by a million votes in the 1958 
election. 

Last May, Oklahoma voters also 
rejected the "right-to-work" law at a 
special election. Oklahoma voted for 
Republican candidate Nixon in 1960 
but returned a Democratic majority 
in the 1964 election. 

The huge Democratic majorities also 
raised hopes for possible repeal in some 
states of so-called "right-to-work" laws 
that have been enacted by state legis- 
latures. 

Wyoming, for instance, elected a 
right wing Republican legislature in 
1962 and a Republican governor, and 
immediately afterward shoved a "right- 
to-work" law through the legislature. 
This time, however, Wyoming went 
Democratic. 

The NCIP said that a close study 
will be made of the makeup of the 
new legislatures in such states as Wyo- 
ming, Indiana and Utah, with a view 
to ascertaining the possibility of repeal 
of existing "right-to-work" legislation 
in these states. 



R-T-n Laws Cause 
Strife and Chaos 

A veteran mediator and former 
White House trouble-shooter, John 
R. Steelman, has warned that so- 
called "right-to-work" laws "would 
set back our progress in labor-man- 
agement relations by half a cen- 
tury." 

Steelman, a former director of 
the U. S. Conciliation Service and 
assistant to Pres. Harry Truman, 
said laws forbidding union shop 
agreements "serve no useful pur- 
pose" and would lead to "chaos in 
our industrial relations." 

In a statement released by the 
National Council for Industrial 
Peace, Steelman said enactment of 
"right-to-work" laws "inevitably 
brings strife and bitterness into the 
highly favorable state of labor- 
management relations we have 
achieved." 

He noted that work stoppages 
set a new postwar low last year, 
and commented: "This, together 
with the fact that more than 71 
percent of the contracts between 
management and labor contain un- 
ion security clauses as a result of 
true collective bargaining shows 
that the present formula for indus- 
trial relations is working well." 



Appalachia Bill Priority 
Urged For New Congress 



The Appalachia Bill, caught in the 
logjam of unfinished business at the 
end of the last Congress, should be a 
prior subject for action when Congress 
convenes in January, a Republican and 
a Democrat asserted on Washington 
Reports to the People, AFL-CIO public 
service program heard on more than 
700 radio stations. 

"This shall certainly be my objec- 
tive," declared Rep. W. Pat Jennings 
(D-Va.). "I think it will be one of the 
first 'musts,' since the governors of 
the 10 states [in the area] asked the 
government to act in this region as in 
the Tennessee Valley Area." 

"We ought to get at this bill prompt- 
ly after we come back in January," 
Rep. Robert J. Corbett (R-Pa.) said. 
"Resources of all kinds — human and 
natural — meanwhile are lying there 
going to waste in the midst of misery 
and poverty." 

Jennings said that a special measure 
to cover Appalachia is necessary, in 
addition to the Economic Opportuni- 
ties or Anti-Poverty Act, because spe- 
cific activities are needed in this by- 



passed region between the prosperous 
East and Middle West. 

Roads are necessary, he said, to get 
goods and people in and out. Without 
them industry will not move in, al- 
though there is a huge labor surplus, 
and agricultural goods cannot be taken 
to markets. 

Jennings said the area has "some 
of the most beautiful scenery in the 
world, but there are no roads to get 
to it." 

Unemployment in the area is high- 
est in the nation, Corbett reported, 
because of the automation of coal 
mines and abandonment of timber and 
other farming. Housing and health 
conditions as a result, he added, "are 
about the worst you can find any- 
where. 

"Perhaps as many as three-fourths 
of the houses lack plumbing or have 
very inadequate plumbing," he said. 
"To make matters worse, there is a 
shortage of doctors and dentists. Tu- 
berculosis is widespread, communi- 
cable diseases of all kinds are well 
above the national average." 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



Federal Manpower Training Program Unsatisfactory 



The CANADIAN LABOR CON- 
GRESS is still unhappy with the fed- 
eral government's manpower training 
program. 

Presenting a brief to the govern- 
ment-sponsored National Employment 
Committee, the Congress charged that 
the program is patchy and hit-and- 
miss, due in part to lack of co-ordina- 
tion. 

Basic to the CLC's complaints is 
the fact that no genuine survey of la- 
bor demand has been made to give the 
authorities adequate knowledge of the 
direction manpower training should 
take. As a result men are being trained 
for non-existent jobs. 

The main need, says the CLC, is a 
nationwide study on a continuing basis 
to find out what skills are needed now 
and which will be needed in the future. 

Another complaint by the Congress 
is that nothing has been done about 
labor mobility, that is, a planned effort 
to move people from unemployment 
areas to places where jobs are begging 
for takers. For example, Ontario ap- 
parently needs skilled workers in a 
number of fields while heavy unem- 
ployment still exists in the Maritimes. 
Has an effort been made to find out if 
east coast workers are available for 
Ontario jobs, or to train east coast 
unemployed for the Ontario labor mar- 
ket? Apparently not, because the min- 
ister of development in Ontario has 
been talking about bringing in skilled 
workers from the Orient. 

The problem of proper co-ordina- 
tion of manpower efforts is bedevilled 
by a multiplicity of agencies. Feder- 
ally there are at least three agencies 
involved, the training division of the 
Labor Department, the National Em- 
ployment Service and the Manpower 
Consultative Service, each involved in 
dealing with labor supply and demand. 

JANUARY, 1965 



To overcome this hodge-podge ar- 
rangement, the Congress suggests a 
Labor Market Board as a single agency 
to match the flow of trained workers 
with the need. 

In its broadside against current man- 
power policies, the Congress had a few 
words to say about deficiencies at the 
provincial level. One involves the low 
level of allowances paid to unemployed 
persons taking training courses. On- 
tario has the highest allowance but in 
this province it is only $5 a day for 
a single person and $9 a day for a 
married man. This is no encourage- 
ment to continue the training period. 



As a result the percentage of dropouts 
is far too high, almost 50%. 

The criticism of the Congress is not 
likely to go unheeded. The federal 
government is at the moment partic- 
ularly sensitive to views expressed by 
major responsible bodies. By the time 
the 1965 parliament meets, steps may 
have been taken to rectify the situa- 
tion. But the offsetting factor is that 
Labor Department officials seem to 
think that employers are satisfied with 
the present types of training programs. 

What happens next to the program 
will depend on which point of view 
prevails. 



Pulpwood Can Be Transplanted 
By Pipeline, Institute Reports 



Another technological advance 
which could cut deeply into employ- 
ment in the Canadian woods has been 
announced by the Pulp and Paper Re- 
search Institute of Canada. 

The institute has made public its 
assessment of the feasibility of trans- 
porting pulpwood by pipeline. It can 
be done, is the verdict. 

The research was underwritten by 
10 major companies, Ontario Paper, 
Irving Pulp and Paper, Marathon Cor- 
poration, Dominion Tar and Chemical, 
Champion Paper, Fraser Companies 
(all are paper or pulp and paper pro- 
ducers), Foundation of Canada (con- 
struction), Pembina Pipeline (oil), and 
the Canadian National and Canadian 
Pacific Railways. All are Canadian 
companies except Champion Paper of 
Hamilton, Ohio. 

The pipeline idea was tested a few 
months ago for a five-week period near 
Marathon, Ontario, on the north shore 
of Lake Superior. The results indi- 



cated that fullscale use of a wood- 
chip pipeline by the pulp and paper 
industry would cut woods operation 
costs by as much as 50%, or total 
production costs by 25%. 

The president of the research insti- 
tute, Dr. Lincoln Thiesmeyer, has 
stated optimistically that all that is 
needed is for some company or group 
of companies to undertake the pipe- 
line project. 

However, company spokesmen say 
that not all the problems in getting 
chips into the line at the woods end, 
dewatering them at the mill, and join- 
ing branch lines to trunk lines, have 
been solved. 

The pulp pipeline is not going to 
take over pulp transportation in the 
near future, but some companies are 
talking about financing a pilot project 
and if that works successfully, the new 
method will be just as revolutionary 
in the forestry business as the power 
saw was when it was first introduced. 

21 



Family Fishing Results 




By FRED GOETZ 

Readers inav write to Brother Goetz at S65S S.E. Ellis Street, Portland, Ore. 



Bucks To Be Proud Of 




John Newton and his two bucks 



In the "hunt game" the grass is oft- 
times greener in other pastures, leastwise 
that is the conclusion of John Newton of 
Lomita. California, a member of the 
Carpenter's Union, Local 1407, out of 
Wilmington. 

John and his hunting partner, Frank 
Hallen, recently tripped to Utah, the state 
of record buck deer. Here's a photo de- 
picting John's prowess with scope and 
rifle — two chunky male deer, both sport- 
ing racks like grandma's rocking chair 
with four points on port side and star- 
board. 

Scene of the hunt was in the Mt. Bruin 
country, about 20 miles east of Price, 
Utah. 

Nice going, John. 

A Nice Way to Recover 

Howard Hare of Ann Arbor. Michi- 
gan, a member of Local 512, has some 
spare time on his hands while recovering 
from a serious automobile accident. He 
utilized a part of it in fishing and found 



that the size of the smallmouth bass in 
Whitmore Lake was no definite indica- 
tion of the weight. Of the two 23-inch 
specimens he took, one tipped the scales 
over five pounds while the other weighed 
closer to 4V> pounds. 

Try Crow Off Season 

Berated by farmers, maligned by bird 
watchers, disparaged by ornithologists and 
despised by practically every fellow mem- 
ber of its own feathery clan is "Corcus 
brachynchos," otherwise known as 
"CROW." 

If a fella' ever needed a friend it's the 
crow. But outside of its own parents, it 
has none. Ah, but the good Lord must 
love him for it is blessed with a high 
degree of intelligence; manages to live 
off the land in spite of all efforts to 
displace him. Like all persecuted crea- 
tures it has learned to live with ill will; 
has become duecedly clever in avoiding 
its many enemies. 

What has taken many years for man 
to learn about the range of rifle projec- 
tiles, the crow seems to know instinctive- 
ly. His powers of communication are 
equally remarkable, ample to establish 
danger and distress signals to winged 
brethern, also to broadcast the setting up 
of free, outdoor chow lines. 

When the hunt season closes on up- 
land game birds and waterfowl, you can 
keep that scattergun employed stalking 
crows. He's a worthy target. This black 
bandit can pour on the coals to a speed 
of 30 miles per hour. He breeds in the 
spring; roosts and nests in trees and is 
partially migratory. 

The crow's insatiable appetite leads it 
on an almost constant search for food. 
Essential for successful crow hunting are 
calls, either manual or the electronic 
variety. The crow hunter must be a 
master at concealing himself from view 
for this black wingster seems to have a 
built in pair of binoculars. 

A proven crow gun is a 12-gauge, 
loaded with high brass 6's and more 
than a bit of luck. 

Have at 'em! 



Sakauye's children display catch 



A letter from Gene Sakauye of Mont- 
real, Canada conjurs up an image of the 
great fishing in Ontario. Gene, a mem- 
ber of Local 1244, writes: 

"Your past columns about fishing in 
Canada and on the west coast brings 
back memories of my childhood's fishing 
fun when we lived on the west coast of 
Canada near Vancouver Island. I was 
particularly taken with the large Dun- 
geness crabs caught by your son James 
and the gigantic sturgeon by Mrs. Goetz. 

"Like you, Fred, we too include the 
whole family on as many fishing junkets 
as possible. Enclosed is a photo of my 
children with some walleyes I took from 
the waters out of Cornwall, Ontario, dur- 
ing one of my job assignments there. 
Later our family visited the same area 
and caught seven pickerel in about two 
hours before the rains came. 

Lots of Chinook to Cook 

No doubt the next photo and tale 
will also bring back memories to Brother 
Sakauye of Montreal. Here's a snapshot 




John Murray and a 68-pound Chinook 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



of John Murray, a member of the Car- 
penters' Union at Nanaimo, British Co- 
lumbia with a 68 pound Chinook. The 
pic was sent in by his dad, Murray 
Griffith, who lives in Portland, Oregon. 

What's a Good Bass Book? 

We're in receipt of a letter from Mrs. 
W. Klingeman of Barnesville, Pennsyl- 
vania. Husband. Wilbur Klingeman, a 
member of the Carpenters' Union, will 
retire this year and both want to know 
of a good book on bass fishing. I sug- 
gest, Mrs. Klingeman, that you obtain 
a copy of Robert Page Lincoln's book,' 
"Bass Fishing." Lincoln is an expert bass 
angler and has the capacity for inform- 
ing his readers on the "how. why and 
wherefore" of this fascinating sport. It 
has 376 pages and lots of illustrations." 

'Doe-boys' Are Winning 

The arguments for or against deer-of- 
either-sex seasons have long been fair- 
game topics for members of the hot 
stove league. 

The bucks-only advocates would seem 
to be diminishing in numbers, if not in 
vociferousness, under the withering fire 
of the doe boy's statistical support. The 
latter can site such game as the fact 
that, since the inauguration of any-deer 
seasons in Arizona, the number of bucks 
taken by hunters has almost trebled. 

As another example, in Montana an 
increase of 300 per cent was noted in 
the total deer harvest during the first 
five years of deer-of-either-sex hunting. 
Moreover, the buck kill in Montana 
during that period spiralled from 39,000 
to 90,000. 

Bring 'Em Back Alive 

Brother Hiram E. Merrill of Lagrange, 
Maine, has an interesting hobby. He traps 
'em alive! Resent addition to his mena- 
gerie include a bear, fox, coons, ravens 
and crows. H. E. is a member of Local 
621 out of Bangor, Maine. 




Members of the Carpenters' Union — 
in good standing — can earn a pair of the 
illustrated METRIC fishing lures by send- 
ing in a photo of a fishing or hunting 
scene and a few words as to what the 
photo is all about. 

Send it to: 

Fred Goetz, Dept. OMME 
0216 S.W.Iowa 
Portland, Oregon 97201 
Please mention your Local number. 
Of course, retired members and members 
of the family are eligible. 




These 

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Name- 



_Age_ 



Address- 
City 



-State- 



Occupation, 



JANUARY, 1965 



23 



GENERAL OFFICERS OF: 



THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave. N.W., 
Washington 1, D. C. 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington 1, D. C. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Finlay C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington 1. D. C. 



SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 
William Sidell 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington 1, D. C. 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington 1, D. C. 



general treasurer 
Peter Terzick 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington 1, D. C. 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10. N. Y. 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place. Springfield. New Jersey 

Third District. Harry Schwarzer 
16678 State Road, North Royalton, Ohio 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd„ S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fifth District. Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16, Minn. 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia. Kansas City 10, Mo. 

Seventh District. Lyle J. Hiller 

1126 American Bank Bldg., 

621 S. W. Morrison St., Portland 5, Ore. 

Eighth District, Patrick Hogan 
8564 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 7, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 



M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

All correspondence for the General Executive Board 
must be sent to the General Secretary. 



WE NEED YOUR 

LOCAL UNION 

NUMBER 

Because we are chang- 
ing over our mail list to 
our new computer, it is 
impossible for us to add, 
subtract, or change an 
address if we do not have 
your Local Union num- 
ber. Therefore, if you 
want your name added to 
the mail list of the jour- 
nal, or if you want it 
taken off, or if you want 
your address changed, 
please include your Local 
Union No. in your re- 
quest. Thank you for 
your cooperation. 

PETER TERZICK 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 



NAME 



LOCAL #_ 



OLD ADDRESS 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



City 



NEW ADDRESS 



Zone 



State 



JLOCAL #. 



City 



Zone 



State 



PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington 1, D. C. 

BE SURE TO WRITE IN YOUR LOCAL UNION NUMBER 



24 



THE CARPENTER 




/ 



LOCAL UNION NEWS 




Carpenter Solons 

Survey Shows More Unionists 
Elected to State Legislatures 

WASHINGTON, D. C. — A survey by Press Associates, a Washington news 
syndicate serving labor publications, shows that more union members are be- 
ing elected to state legislatures than ever before — included members of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of North America. 

Senator Dallas Wolfe, a charter mem- . , , , . , , 
ber of Local Union 1755, has been re- T A,so rated ^ lgh u ar f th f Steelworkers 
elected to the West Virginia state legis- International Brotherhood of Electncal 
lature from the 15th District of his state. Workers, Teamsters United Auto Work- 
As we reported ers ' Typographical Union and members 
in the December is- °* the various railroad brotherhoods. 
Ravmond D Members of 37 international unions were 
Dzendzel. business elected to the 12 state legislatures. 
-^ agent of Local 982, L In ° hl °- Frank ^ m ? was re-elected to 
^"**^ * Detroit was re- state senate - " e ls president of the 
turned to' the Mich- P hi u ° ^r" , 1 ?' as we " as a member of 
igan Senate in No- Bricklayers and Teachers unions. 

grfA Many Brother- Oregon Member S 

AS hood members and -_-. .. _ T 

M officers were also Kecall Yesteryear 

„, „ elected to local po- 

Dallas Wolfe sitions — school SALEM, ORE. — Old-timers honored 

boards, city councils, etc. by L.U. 1065 at a testimonial dinner 

The PAI study of 12 representative November 19 recalled the early days of 

states from coast to coast shows that not tne loca l' rich in c °l° r and curiosities 

only is the number of union-member leg- °f the past. 

islators growing, but that a large number Tne two oldest members, Eugene Crail 

of unions are involved. and R. J. Ketterman, have put in 51 

Hereunder is the breakdown on the and 50 veal " s > respectively. But even they 

number of union members serving: cannot recall the day when L.U. 1065 got 

State Senate House its start-April 11. 1902. 

n . Back then, the union was concerned 

Uelaware 2 5 about the moral fiber of its memb ership. 

0? nSaS * ■> Hardly more than a month after it re- 

Jr 10 ' ^ ceived its charter, the local was asking 

Oregon 5 10 a mem b er to resign because of "injudi- 

Massachusetts ... 1 11 dous use of i ntoxicating ij quor ." Shortly 

Minnesota 4 16 thereafter, the lid was screwed even 

Missouri \ 15 tighter on the ale keg when the member- 

M° nt h "A V c ship P assed a motion to levy a fine of 

North Dakota ... - 5 50 cen ts against any brother "found pa- 
South Dakota ... - tronizing Jack Roger's saloon. . . ." 

Washington 6 14 Fortunately, the history of the Local 

West Virginia ... 4 15 ; s not all restriction and moralism. There 
Relatively few of these states are con- were many benefits and privileges asso- 
sidered heavily union. Yet, for the most ciated with membership, too. By 1905, 
part, a fair number of unionists were one of the first members had been pro- 
elected to office. vided with unemployment compensation. 
The total shows that in the 12 states, "For the relief of an injured member," 
33 union members are in the state senates the local's minutes report, "the local 
and 107 in the state houses, for a total voted to send the family $5 a month for 
of 140 unionists in the legislatures. a period of three months and to continue 
In heavily industrial sections the total sending that amount if more was needed." 
picture would probably be altered, but It was. After four months of disability, 
there were more members of the Ameri- the brother and his family were treated 
can Federation of Teachers elected to the to a load of wood. 

legislatures in the 12 states than mem- The depression had a sharp impact on 

bers of any other unions. the local. Faced with disappearance of 

JANUARY, 1965 



Pennsylvania Council 
Honors Stevenson 




President Charles Slinker of the Penn- 
sylvania State Council of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, 
AFL-CIO, recently presented a plaque to 
retiring First General Vice President John 
R. Stevenson in recognition of his mem- 
bership and service since April, 1907. The 
plaque was presented at the 45th annual 
convention banquet in the Penn Alto 
Hotel, Altoona, Pennsylvania. The din- 
ner was attended by Finlay Allan, new 
First General Vice President; Richard 
Livingston, General Secretary; Raleigh 
Rajoppi, Pennsylvania Executive Board 
Member; and 200 delegates and officers 
of Carpenters local unions throughout 
the state. Council Secretary George Wa- 
lish acted as toastmaster. 

jobs, it agreed to reduce wages from 
$8.00 to $6.00 a day in July, 1931. 

Today, with the depression and 25-cent 
fines for smoking unpleasant memories 
of the past, L.U. 1065 can be proud of 
a membership of about 400 — 10 of them 
with 30 or more years in the Local. 

For the ceremonies and pin presenta- 
tions last November, General Executive 
Board Member L. J. Hiller attended, to 
congratulate the local and its veterans. 

Honored with 40-year pins were: Earl 
M. Johnson, 40 years; Hugh Stryker, 41; 
Kelly James, 43; William T. Morrison. 
M. E. Moore, 47, and Pierre Blessing, 48. 

Four members were honored for 30 
years of more: W. Mortensen, 30 years; 
D. R. Peterson, 33; William Stepanek, 
35, and B. C. Wanless, 39. 

Other brothers commended for 25 or 
(Continued on page 36) 



25 



Lubbock's L.U. 1884 Awards 25- Year Pins 




Twenty-five-year members, seated in the photo, left to right, front row: Walter Davies, 
44 years; Bain McCarroll, 47 years; Chester V. Smith, B. H. Dennison, 30 years; J. H. 
Parnell, 26 years. Second row: George Best, 26 years; Ralph H. Edler, 28 years; 
Gordon Higgins, 30 years; O. B. Williams, 28 years; D. C. Cannon, 25 years; J. G. 
Wilhite, 28 years. Third row: A. L. Adair, 27 years; J. A. Martin, 30 years; J. C. 
McClellan, 25 years; Fraser Moore, 30 years; Woodrow Tyson, 26 years. 



LUBBOCK, TEX.— Members of L.U. 
1884, held an open house October 12, 
honoring members who have been in the 
organization 25 years or more. 

A. E. Davis, president of Local 1884, 
served as master of ceremonies. Gene 
Alderson, Mayor pro-tem, spoke to the 
group. 

Chester V. Smith, Secretary-Treasurer 
of the Texas State Council of Carpenters, 
presented 25-year pins to the members. 



Members not present to receive their 
pins and length of tenure are H. C. 
Bruckner, 45 years; R. B. Smith, Jr., 40 
years; C. W. Benson, 39 years; B. A. 
Miller, 31 years; Joe E. Davidson, 30 
years; H. H. Frye, 30 years; Claude B. 
Martin, 30 years; H. D. Allen, 28 years; 
C. C. Stringer Sr., 28 years; E. D. 
Brooks, 27 years; A. G. Stringer, 26 
years; W. S. Alford, 25 years, and James 
Gary, 25 years. 



L.U. 280 Ladies Auxiliary Caters Illinois Council Meet 




ROCKFORD, ILL.— The Ladies' Auxiliary L.U. 280 (above) served luncheon for 
the Illinois State Council of Carpenters, which met recently under the auspices of 
L. U. 792. The ladies are active year-round with a full calendar of events. Linen) 
auctions, bake sales and rummage sales help raise funds for local charities, including 
the Kent Convalescent Home for Children, Forest Home for Girls and the River 
Bluff Home for the Aged. The ladies also pack their social calendar full of after- 
meeting coffee and dessert buffets, picnics, and pot luck suppers. 



Look for the Label of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of North 
America, a sign of quality. 




92-Year-Old Member 
Dies in Connecticut 

NORWICH, CONN.— Everett Morgan 
Rogers of Wauwecus Street, Norwichtown 
section, died recently after a brief illness. 
He was 92 years old. He was born in 
Norwichtown April 27, 1872, the son of 
Porter and Mary Morgan Rogers and was 
married to Mary E. 
Fargo, December 
24, 1902. in Frank- 
lin, Connecticut. 

Rogers was a 
carpenter most of 
his life working 
for Blackledge and 
Co., P. F. Sweeney, 
Louis Ortman and 
Walter Wibberley. 
He also engaged in 
farming. He was a 
charter member of the Norwich Grange 
since 1908, and fOr over 60 years he 
belonged to Carpenters Local Union 137, 
joining in 1902. 

Surviving is his widow Mary E. Rogers, 
a daughter. Miss Beulah M. Rogers, with 
whom he resided, and a son, John M. 
Rogers, both of Norwichtown; also a son 
and daughter by a first marriage, Mrs. 
Alice S. Rogers of Colchester and Charles 
P. Rogers of Norwichtown. 

Two Centenarian 




Carpenters Die 



CEDAR RAPIDS, IA.— Brother Den- 
nis (Dave) Leonard, Local 308, Cedar 
Rapids, died recently at the age of 103. 
Mr. Leonard came to Cedar Rapids in 
the 1870's and was a coach carpenter 
foreman for the BCR&N railroad for 28 
years. Later, he served as business agent 
for the Carpenters' local union for 20 
years. The remainder of his working 
years was spent as a contractor. He re- 
tired at the age of 82. 

When asked his formula for long life, 
Mr. Leonard would answer: "I've worked 
hard all my life, and I've always taken 
good care of myself." And he strived to 
avoid "bad habits." 

PRINCETON, N. J. — Another carpen- 
ter who was over 100 years old and re- 
cently died was Brother Merchon Green. 
He passed away on October 10, just a 
few days before his 104th birthday. He 
was initiated into Local 781, Princeton, 
N. J., on May 29, 1903, and retired from 
carpenter work at the age of 90. 




Brother Green, center, above, with Wm. 
J. Birch, left, and Ernest F. Drake, right, 
both members for more than 50 years. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



Apprentice Completion Exercises in Chicago 




Certificates of completion of training are presented to the following graduates, most of whom are shown above (although not in 
the order listed): Wolfgang Aim, Local 1784; Robert K. Anderson, 434; Martin Anthony, 1185; Ronald Arkema, 242; Ted Ar- 
vanites, 58; Gerald Beauchamp, 181; Robert C. Blanchard, 839; Ernest Bleicher, 10; Glenn Borge, 58; Edward J. Buric, 1786 
Delmar Calgaro, 272; Victor L. Camp, 58; Dennis Carr, 839; Andrew C. Cascararo, 250; Leon Cherest, 434; Marvin Christen 
sen, 242; John F. Cole, 434; Lloyd E. Dahlen, 80; Elwood Danielson, 58; Douglas W. Dewsnap, 80; David J. Dioguardi, 434 
Robert J. Doyle, 1527; Ronald Dubs, 448; Wm. Erdenberger, 58; Thomas Flood, 13; David F. Fritz, 181; John Gaffney, 1185: 
Mathew Galligan, 13; Dennis Gardner, 80; Harvey Geary, 1185; Michael Gibbons, 58; John Grande, 1539; Werner Haefke, 1307 
Robert L. Hager, 1185; Allan Hampson, 558; Roger Hansen, 181; William Hansen, 434; Nick Heinz, 1539; Michael Hermes, 13 
Gene B. Herring, 181; Gerald Hescott, 1185; Julius L. Horcher, 461; Jerome D. Huber, 1367; Gordon Johnson, 58; Robert W. 
Johnson, 58; Stanley J. Jurecki, 1185; Patrick Joyce, 1185; Thomas S. Jurack, 1128; David B. Kelley, 1889; James B. King, 1889 
Stefan Kleiner, 1784; Hans Klingenberg, 419; Allan Krapf, 448; Jerome Kurowski, 58; Daniel J. Leidke, 839; Robert L. Logan 
58; Donald Lupinski, 434; Thomas Lynch, 62; John Martin, 58; John Martiny, 1185; Nick Mazzocchi, 13; Thomas McKernin 
1922; Edward Michalski, 181; Glenn Miller, 1185; Kenneth Mocarski, 54; George Moline, 1784; Duane Moore, 181; Ralph Mo 
rales, 1185; Robert Muller, 434; Kenneth J. Murphy, 1996; Hartwig Naliwko, 419; Henning Nielsen, 272; Edward Nordoff, 1185 
Eugene Nowak, 242; Andrew J. O'Donnell, 1185; Michael O'Neill, 199; William Parenti, 181; Eugene Partipilo, 1185; Raymond 
Reidy, Jr., 1185; Patrick Ridge, 58; Roger Rolkosky, 1185; Walter Ruppert, 242; Lane Schnotala, 141; LeRoy E. Siewert, 558 
William Sonka, 54; James J. Stack, 13; Josef Straub, 419; Michael Tocheck, 1786; Enos L. Toms, 58; Ronald E. Trapp, 1185 
Eugene H. Voight, 1185; Cyril Wagner, Jr., 58; Donald H. Wagner, 141; David Walters, 181; Alvin Wille, 434; Paul Wilson, 
1128; Ronald C. Wrona, 448; Gerald Zbylut, 181; James Zeephat, 434. 



CHICAGO, ILL.— The Chicago 
District Council held completion exer- 
cises for an apprentice group Novem- 
ber 12. 

The class of graduates to whom 
certificates were issued was the largest 
class in recent years. Ninety-nine ap- 
prentices were in the finishing class, 
and approximately 80 were present in 
person to receive certificates and to 
participate in the exercises. Absen- 
tees regrettably unable to attend were 
excused because of a variety of rea- 
sons, a number of them having en- 
tered the armed services. 

The affair, co-chairmaned by Sec- 
retary Thompson and President Ken- 
ney of the District Council, was ad- 
dressed by a number of visiting guests, 
who wished the graduates Godspeed 
and success. Notable among the 
speakers was First General Vice Pres- 
ident Finlay Allan. Others who ad- 
dressed the group were Tom Hall, rep- 
resenting the Construction Employers 
Association; Ralph Winslow and Don- 
ald Dvorak, Manager and Assistant 
Manager, respectively, of the Builders 
Association of Chicago; Richard Pep- 




First General Vice President Finlay Allan 
addresses the gathering at the Chicago 
apprentice exercises. 

per of the Pepper Construction Com- 
pany and Chairman of the Joint Ap- 
prentice Committee; Earl McMahon 
and Thomas Nayder, President and 
Secretary, respectively, of the Build- 
ing Trades Council of Chicago; Stan- 



ley L. Johnson, Executive Vice Pres- 
ident of the Illinois State Federation 
of Labor and C. I. O.; General Repre- 
sentative W. E. Corbin; Frank E. 
Frieden, Manager of the Carpenters 
Welfare and Pension Funds; James 
Hale, Bureau of Apprenticeship, U. S. 
Dept. of Labor; and James Senes, 
States Supervisor of Trade & Industrial 
Education. Also present and briefly 
addressing the class were Robert 
Swanson, Chairman of the Carpentry 
Department at Washburne Trade 
School, and Harold Carpenter, Super- 
visor of Apprentice Training at High- 
land Park High School, both of whom 
appeared, accompanied by the appren- 
tice instructors of both schools. 

Joining in the exercises were the 
business representatives of the local 
unions affiliated with the Chicago Dis- 
trict Council, as well as a large num- 
ber of officers of the locals, all of 
whom were present to encourage the 
graduates in their chosen fields of en- 
deavors. 

The affair culminated in a sumptu- 
ous luncheon for the graduates and 
the many guests in attendance. 



JANUARY, 1965 



27 



Michigan Local Honors Old Timers, Apprentices, Officers 



LANSING. MICH.— L.U. 1449 re- 
cently honored old timers, gave graduate 
apprentices their pins, and commemo- 
rated the service of past officers. At a 
banquet held at the Reo Club House, 
L.U. 1449 members heard salutory re- 
marks by Edward Powers. President of 
the State Building Trades Council; 
Charles Romine, State field coordina- 
tor for the apprentice program; Harold 
YValper, Lansing Community College Co- 
ordinator, and Francis Wilder, appren- 
tice school instructor. 




Guests speakers at Lansing, Michigan, 
included, seated: Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
YValper and Mr. and Mrs. Edward Pow- 
ers. Standing: Mr. and Mrs. Francis Wil- 
der and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Romine. 

Cedar Rapids Group 
Honors Walter Shadle 

CEDAR RAPIDS. IA. — Walter F. 
Shadle, a member of Carpenters Local 
308, has been honored for 52 years of 
service to the labor movement. 

The honor was conferred at a Novem- 
ber meeting of the Cedar Rapids Labor 
Assembly (AFL-CIO). Mr. Shadle was 
presented a plaque which read: 

"In recognition of 52 years of service 
to the furtherance of unionism, to a sin- 
cere and faithful friend from the Cedar 
Rapids Labor Assembly AFL-CIO this 
year of 1964." 

The presentation was by Ethan Spro- 
ston, president of the assembly. Also 
taking part were P. R. Farris, business 
agent of Plumbers Local 125, and Betty 
Talkington, of the women's activities 
department of the Iowa Federation of 
Labor. 

Shadle began his apprenticeship in the 
labor movement as a coal miner. He 
then served several years as a fireman 
on the North Western railroad before 
becoming a carpenter. 

Among the union offices he has held 
are: vice president, Iowa Federation, 1932 
and 1934; vice president, State Council 
of Carpenters; business agent. Local 308, 
for more than 26 years. 




Old-Timers at the L.U. 1449 Banquet: 1st row, left to right, Frank Pretzel, Charles 
Fox, Oscar Hopkins, Harold Byrd, Ellis Oxendale, Leo Murphy, Frank King, Lewis 
Hunt, Roman Ounnebeck. 2nd row, left to right: Thomas B. Keaton, Fred Morgan, 
George Wise, Guy Reeves, Donald Colgrove, Clayton Thorpe, Herbert Stoutenberg, 
Emil LaDuke. 




Apprentices receiving their pins were: 1st row, left to right, Sam Tumminello, Her- 
man Miller, Lawrence Tabor, Verlin Hopkins, Paul KeJIogg, Harold Mingus, George 
Wise, James Blake. 2nd row, left to right, Arthur Proper, Harold Walper, Francis 
Wilder, Charles Romine, Rondy Heiser. 




Past officers of Local 1449 who received pins included: Front row, left to right- 
Thomas B. Keaton, Fred Morgan, George Wise, Chester Long, Roman Dunnebeck, 
Lewis Hunt, P. F. King, Charles Fox. Back row, left to right — Frank Pretzel, Walter 
Dembowski, Bernard Bryan, Paul Kellogg, Wayne Keeney, David Hugger, Arthur Six, 
Charles Eddy, Harold Mingus, Sam Tumminello. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Cincinnati Members 
Build Home for Waifs 

CINCINNATI, O.— Up in the Adams 
County hills east of Cincinnati some 
almost incredibly wonderful things have 
been happening. The site is Possum Hol- 
low, near Manchester, Ohio. The events 
spotlight the generosity and initiative of 
Cincinnati area AFL-CIO building trades- 
men and the unique missionary project 
of a Good Samaritan Lady, Molly Ford, 
who has been offering a home and guid- 
ance to some hundred waifs, refugee chil- 
dren from Cincinnati's ramshackle slum 
jungle. Molly's place is a farm with a 
few cows, chickens, pigs and a tobacco 
patch. 

Molly needed a better shelter than her 
tarpapered former hen house. Some time 
ago word of the need got to carpenters 
Russ Waters and Robert Beischel at Blue 
Creek from the Rev. Richard Steinkamp, 
circuit missionary in the area. After a 
visit to Possum Hollow, Waters went to 
work on every friend and associate he 
could reach. At sun-up the hot last Sat- 
urday of July, this summer, a caravan 
of cars and two trucks rolled up the 
Hollow road. 

Twenty-two union craftsmen of all 
trades led by twelve union carpenters, 
fortified with construction materials do- 
nated by trade contractor firms, began to 
rip 4x4's with power saws, set flooring 
to the tune of a steady tatoo of hammer- 
ing. By 10 a.m. the men were on the 
roof nailing down sheeting and by 4 p.m. 
Molly was the owner of a brand new 
home. With one more Saturday visit 
volunteers painted the inside and installed 
electrical and plumbing equipment. 

Carpenter house raisers for Molly were 
Dick Lankheit, John Sander, Walter Lin- 
denmeyer, Vick Seim. Harold Seim. Joe 
Zink. Larry Bross, Al Rudler, Ken Hu- 
ber, Tom Powers, Russ Waters, and Les 
Waters. Architect service was by Jack 
Burdick. 



L.U. 517 Build Presidential Platform 





■.■la"***"'" 1 " T"*""^* 1 *--™**^^'*'"'"'' HRRMRsSSNHI^^^HEf^HEl^^i*!^':^::: ... &jjn69BHHMBs'..-. ■■: %. 

PORTLAND, MAINE — In anticipation of President Johnson's campaign swing 
through here, last September 28, carpenters from L.U. 517 were asked if they would 
like to assume responsibility for construction of the speaker's platform. 

Anxious to help, Business Agent Kenneth A. Dunphe quickly accepted the honor, 
and delivered a sizeable crew of men to the job, as the picture shows. Lumber foi* 
the stand was donated by Eastern Bidders, of Yarmouth, Maine. 



itfjjifffci.^^^Jka 




Vs* notches in the lj^'x 
J4'x22 , /2° head let you cut 
the full width of a wall- 
board -panel in one swipe/ 
No more torn or ragged 
corners on the panels — 
you get a clean cut right 
up to the very edge of the 
panel every time. 

Use the marking holes at 
16", 24" and 32" to mark 
stud centers without lift- 
ing T-Square — saves 
time, makes it almost 
impossible to miss a stud 
when nailing up panels. 

The blade is same width 
as a standard outlet 
box. You cut both sides 
of the hole with perfect 
accuracy without mov- 
ing the T-Square. 



it's Nf IV... it sGOiD 

IT HAS STUD MARKINGS... 



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IT WILL HELP YOU HANG DRYWALL 
BETTER— EASIER— FASTER! 

New "Gold" T-Square will make those walls and ceilings go up faster — and 
easier, 2"x H*xJ7J-g* blade of heat-treated flexible aluminum alloy lies flat 
against board for fast, clean cuts. And the new anodized gold color finish 
makes numbers and markings show up with greater contrast for easy at-a- 
glance reading. Large numbers read from either end of the blade to make- 
time - wasting mental arithmetic a thing of the past. The handsome gold 
finish also makes a T-Square that's weather- and stain-resistant — a T- 
Square that's lightweight, yet rugged, and built to last. 
No. 05 120 M7 Only $9.00 

NEW IMPROVED 16" CHECKER-HEAD 
ADZE-EYE WALLBOARD HAMMER 

Properly rounded and checkered head dimples wallboard perfectly 

for best possible nailing and easier spotting — without bruising 

paper. Fits-your-hand. offset hickory handle eliminates rapped 

knuckles. Full 16* length gives better balance, makes easy 

rough gauge for 16' centers too. Plus a handy nail puller in 

, the wedge-shaped blade. Usethis thin, strong blade to shift or 

n pry boards into place. Adze-eye head holds handle securely. 

No. 05 164 M7 Only $6.00 

See Your Favorite Goldblatt Dealer or 

Use the Coupon Below to Order Direct. 



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You'll find all the latest, 
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in the big, alt-new Goid- 
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Goldblatt Tool Company,L924-A WalnutSt., Kansas City, Mo. 64141 
Please send me the following tools postpaid: 

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05 164 M7 $6.00 





A crew of volunteer Carpenters nail 
down the roof on the new home. 




1924-A Walnut Street I 
Kansas City, Mo. 64141 |^1T*--j~-™— ■———-——-— ^NE- 



JANUARY, 1965 



29 




Happily, this time, the answer is yes. But 250,000 times each year across this coun- 
try, the answer is a heartbreaking, fearful no. 

Why does something go wrong when these tiny bodies are being formed? Why is a 
seriously defective child born to one out of every ten American families? 

Can more of these children be helped with present medical knowledge? 

What more must we know to prevent this from happening to babies not yet born? 

Answers to these questions are being sought in nationwide programs supported by 
your contributions to The National Foundation-March of Dimes — the largest single 
source of private support for birth defects research and care in history. These answers 
will help prevent birth defects, a problem which concerns every family everywhere. 

The National Foundation — March of Dimes 

Franklin D. Roosevelt, Founder 



L.U. 399 Brothers Help Ambulance Service 




PHILLIPSBURG, N. Y. — The Blairstown Ambulance Corp. recently received 
welcome assistance from Brothers of L.U. 399. Helping in the construction of a new 
addition to the ambulance service building were, from left to right, Harry Phillips, 
William Phillips, Morris Williams and Paul Metzgar. 

Old-Timer Pins Awarded by L.U. 1921 




UNIONDALE, N. Y. — In ceremonies this October, L.U. 1921 presented old-timer 
pins to members with 25 and 50 years of service. In the photo are, seated left to right, 
50-year members Joseph Southard and William Palk, Local President Eugene Harti- 
gan, General Representative John Rogers, 50-year veterans Eri Larson and William 
Lundquist. Standing, left to right, are 25-year brothers Thomas Thompsen, Johiij 
Wiegand, Jr., George Schmidt and Harry Bottcher; Financial Secretary Benjamin, 
Edward; 25-year member John Wiegand, Sr.; Business Representative John Rosen 
Strom; 25-year men Josef Steffensen, Walter Otto, Charles Biehler, John Ferris, 
Abram Kells. 




3 easy ways to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedbor "88" for all electric drills. 
Bores faster in any wood at any angle. Sizes V4" 
to ?V', $.75 each. %" to 1", $.85 each. lVs" 
to \]/ 2 ", $1.30 each. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, Va" to 
3". Only $4.20. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, 5 / e " to l 3 / 4 ". Only $3.80. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
Gives double-cutter boring action. Only 16 turns 
to bore 1" holes through 1" wood. Sizes %" to 
1V 2 ". As low as $1.15 each. 

EVERY IRWIN BIT made of high analysis 
steel, heat tempered, machine-sharpened 
and highly polished, too. Buy from your 
independent hardware, building supply or 
lumber dealer. 

Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 

only $1.25 for 50 ft. size 
New and improved Irwin self-chalking design. 
Precision made of aluminum alloy. Practically 
damage-proof. Fits the pocket, fits 
the hand. 50 ft. and 100 ft. sizes. Get 
Strait-Line Micro-Fine chalk refills and 
Tite-Snap replacement lines, too. Get 
a perfect chalk line every time. 



IRWIN 



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Ohio 




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Raises Partitions! 

Hundreds of 
Other Uses'. 

Amazing HANDYMAN 
jacks up walls, partitions, 
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timbers, etc. LIFTS, 
PULLS, PUSHES with 3 
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Sturdily constructed of 
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MAIL Your Order NOW! 

Rush only $20.95 now for your HANDYMAN 
TOOL, F.O.B. Bloomfield, Ind. Actually a ?40 
value. Shpg. Wt. 28 lbs. Satisfaction guaranteed 
or money back. MAIL ORDER COUPON TODAY! 
USER-AGENTS WANTED! Demonstrate to 
Friends . . . Your HANDYMAN Pays for itself in 
Few Orders . . . and Additional Orders Pay You 
GOOD EXTRA CASH. Check coupon for FREE 
Details! 

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Dept. 



HARRAH MFG. CO., Dept. A-59 
Bloomfield, Indiana 

Enclosed find $20.95. Please rush me HANDY- 
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completely satisfied, I may return HANDYMAN 
within 30 days for full and immediate refund. 

Name 

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I — I Check here if you want Details of User-Agent 
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JANUARY, 1965 



31 



25-Year Members of L.U. 1564 Honored 




CASPER, WYO.— At a social gathering held at the Carpenters Hall, L.U. 1564 
presented pins to eight out of 11 members for 25 years' service with the Union. 
Those receiving pins from President Gerald Evans, left, and Business Representative 
and Financial Secretary' Paul Johnson, right, were: Frank Sauter, Ted Cooper, Ward 
Lewis, John Haass, Frank Tomlin, Roy Uriens, Jake Hanna and Joe Bakken. En- 
titled to the pins but absent were Roy Gay, Oscar Hagen and Charley Penn. 



Complete Carbide Blade 

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One FOLEY Car- 
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and side grinding. 
Yet, because the 
FOLEY grinder was 
designed specifically 
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blades, it sells for less 
than half the price 
you'd pay for a costly 
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In fact, a FOLEY grind- 
er can pay for itself on 
the savings from 100 
average carbide blade 
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December Contributions 
Kennedy-Roosevelt Fund 

Local No. 

10, Chicago, 111. . . . $48.63 

13, Chicago. 111. . . . 43.75 

39. Cleveland, O. . . 105.50 

105, Cleveland, O. . . 25.00 

146, Schenectady, 

N. Y 100.00 

171, Youngstown, O. 100.00 

176, Newport, R. I. . 10.00 

180, Vallejo, Calif. . 22.68 
232, Fort Wayne, 

Ind 100.00 

342, Pawtucket, R. I. 150.00 
642, Richmond, 

Calif 60.00 

762, Quincy, Mass. . 38.00 
801, Woonsocket, 

R. 1 5.00 

1135, Port Jefferson, 

N. Y 3.60 

1319, Albuquerque, 

N. Mex 40.75 

1367, Chicago, 111. ... 5.00 

1539, Chicago, 111. ... 50.00 

2073, Milwaukee, Wis. 235.00 

2189, Madera, Calif. . 2.00 

2463. Ventura, Calif. . 10.00 

3119, Tacoma, Wash.. 40.00 
Ladies' Auxiliaries, 
California State 

Council 10.00 

Angelo M. Perez, 

Los Angeles, Calif. . 2.00 

Total for December . .$ 1,206.91 
Previous contributions. 122,500.00 

Total to date $123,706.91 



Boston Member 
Invenls Panel Tie 

Boston, Mass. — Cornelius L. Murphy, 
member of Local Union 67. Boston, has 
been granted a patent for his invention, 
a panel tie. 

Bro. Murphy's metal plate, used in 
tying panelling to studs, consists of a 
stamped piece of resilient metal of about 
22 gauge. It has a slight bend to it and 
holes are stamped into it. 

In use, the tie is screwed to the rear 
side of a shiplapped panel, then screwed 
to the face of the supporting studding. 
The slight bend of the metal then exerts 
an outward pressure on the rear of the 
next adjacent piece of panelling, which 
is inserted under the lip of the preceed- 
ing panel. 

The advantages claimed for the in- 
vention are that it allows the panelling to 
move with changes in" temperature and 
humidity without disrupting the tie. In 
addition, the panels are installed with no 
nails or screws showing and, if it is de- 
sired to remove the panels, they can be 
easily removed without any damage to 
their faces. 

• 
Read The Carpenter regularly to keep 
posted on news of your Union. Send us 
news of the activities of your Union. 



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32 



THE CARPENTER 




ROOF TRUSSES 



Performance 


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TECO SPLIT RING ROOF TRUSSES 



The newest thing in roof trusses. 



Timber Engineering Company (TECO) 
has announced the availability of a new 
folder describing the firm's system of 
roof truss construction built with split 
ring connectors. Although concerned pri- 
marily with trusses for short and medium 
spans (20-50'), the new TECO folder ex- 
plains how the ring connector system has 
been "performance proven" for over 30 
years through its use in structures span- 
ning up to 250 feet. Shown in the folder 
are two of the more popular truss designs 
for short and medium spans. A listing 
of other available designs is also pre- 
sented. 

Unlike truss systems making use of gus- 
set plate connections, the TECO ring sys- 
tem requires no special presses or jigs for 
assembly. The folder illustrates how 
trusses and other structures built with the 
system can be shipped in "disassembled" 
(knocked down) or "folded" form to job 
sites many hundreds of miles from the 
fabricating plant with the assurance that 
the members will go together correctly. 
An interesting comparison is made be- 
tween the TECO ring connector system 
and the child's Tinker Toy set consisting 
of dowels and hubs which are joined to- 
gether to make different shapes. In the 
TECO system, the structural members are 



the "dowels" and the split ring connectors 
the "hubs." Just as with the Tinker Toy 
set, there is only one way a TECO ring 
connection can be made — the right way. 
For free copies of TECO's new folder, 
write Timber Engineering Company, 
1619 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Wash- 
ington, D. C, zip code 20036. 

LONGER LASTING BLADES 

A new type of band saw blade, de- 
signed for reduced friction, smoother 
cutting, greater accuracy and longer life, 
was placed on the market on Oct. 19, 
1964, by Lee Saw & Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Chicago. Manufactured by a 
unique process which includes high-speed 
bombardment of the blade by small par- 
ticles, the new product looks distinctly 
different from other blades and has sub- 
stantially greater performance character- 
istics, according to Lee engineers. 

Up to a certain stage, the new blade, 
called "krom-kut." is produced by meth- 
ods similar to those followed in making 
any band saw blade, using carbon flex- 
ible steel stock and standard, milling, and 
hardening setting operations. However, 
through the technique of bombardment, 
the familiar blue color is replaced with 
a silver-gray hue and the entire blade, 
including the teeth and gullets are given 
a non-directional matte' finish which is 
essential to the blade's stepped-up per- 
formance. 

The new finish is distinguished by a 
shallow, microscopic porosity which per- 
mits lubricants, through capillary action, 
to spread uniformly over the entire blade, 
including the cutting edges. The bom- 
bardment also hones the teeth to a high 
degree of sharpness, smooths lateral mill- 
ing grooves for easier release of chips, 
and removes cutting burrs and carbon- 
ized deposits. 

The new blades are available in 
most widths common to the industrial 
field and in any standard teeth specifica- 
tions. A free 12-page catalog is available 
by writing Lee Saw & Manufacturing 
Company. 132 S. Green Street, Chicago, 
Illinois 60607. 



». 



TELESCOPING SCAFFOLDS 






Unretouched magnified photos shows dif- 
ference between new "krom-kut" band 
saw blade (top) and conventional blade 
(bottom.) 



A U-shaped work platform. 

Telescoping scaffolds delivered recently 
by Baker-Roos, Inc.. provided a "U" 
shaped work platform with a walkway 
27" x 26' long. Standard Tele-Scaf units 
were used in combination with a spe- 
cially designed bridge, tying the two plat- 
forms together. Scaffold bridge may be 
uncoupled permitting Tele-Scafs to be 
used as individual units. The units shown 
are manually driven winch and cable 
actuated. Safety features incorporate 
double cable fail-safe system; gate-leg 
type outriggers for leveling and stabilizing 
the tower . . . and phenolic, roller bearing 
equipped casters. 

Other Baker Tele-Scaf units are avail- 
able with platform extended heights to 
41'; electrically powered and controlled 
winch mechanism, and remote controls 
on platform. For further information, 
write to Baker-Roos, Inc., Dept. TW782. 
602 West McCarty Street, Indianapolis, 
Indiana 46206. 

LEATHER GRIP HAMMER 

The combination of their Vanadium 
hammer and genuine leather has created 
an all-purpose hammer that seems to 
"grip back," according to the manufac- 
turer, Vaughan & Bushnell Manufacturing 
Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

The genuine leather-wrapped select 
hickory handle is said to permit a firm, 
but relaxed grip while reducing strain. 
The leather is moisture absorbent. 

Other features of the Leather Grip 
hammer include a precision machined 
striking head that provides uniform face 
bevel of proper size to minimize the 
possibility of chipping from glancing 
blows; non-slip claws; and deep inside 
eye taper with triple wedging for tight 
"sure lock" handles. 

Further information may be obtained 
from Vaughan & Bushnell Mfg. Co., 
135 S. LaSalle Street, Chicago, 111. 



JANUARY, 1965 



33 



Planer*Molder-Saw! 




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We're so sure you'll like the Hydrolevel 
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Do a better job setting batters for slabs and 
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eling, sewer and absorption lines, etc. 

HYDROLEVEL is the old reliable water 
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L.U. 595 Honors 
25-Year Men 

LYNN, MASS. — A testimonial dinner 
honoring brothers with 25 years or more 
of service was held Nov. 16 by L.U. 595, 
at the Hotel Edison. Lynn, Mass. One, 
Waldo Pratt, received his 50-year pin at 
the ceremony. Receiving 25-year pins 
were: Wesley Abbott, Carl Anderson. 
Edward Bailey. Edward Blondell. Harvey 
Bray, Joseph Landry, Zigfroid D'Entre- 
mont, Joseph McGraham. Roland Ester- 
brook. Franey St. Clair and Felicia Geau- 
treau. 

Also, Edward Haley, Albert A. Lake, 
Joseph Dee, Edward Dupuis, Edward 
Thibedeau, Arthur McLeoud, Everett 
Nason. Harry Ohlson and William Park- 
inson. Edgar Pillsbury, Adrien LeBlanc, 
Ancil Randall. Oliva N. Villeneuve, Har- 
old McRea. Thomas O'Brien, Charles 
Packard, Silas Loder, Emil Comeau, 
Herman Stack, August Swanson and Roy 
Young. 

Fifty- Year Members 
Honored by L.U. 188 

YONKERS, N.Y.— Two members of 
Local Union No. 188, were recently 
honored for fifty-years' membership in 
the Brotherhood. 

Brothers John Todd and Michael 
Miksa were presented with their fifty-year 
membership pins by President Joseph G. 
Pierro, who cited their active interest in 
the affairs of L.U. 188. Brother Miksa 
held office for many years. 

President Pierro congratulated Brothers 
Todd and Miksa, noting that their affilia- 
tion had, in great measure, laid the 
foundation upon which younger members 
could lead the Local to even greater 
achievement. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Audel Publishers 37 

Belsaw Machinery 34. 37 

Chicago Technical College ... 23 

Construction Cost 36 

Eliason Stair Gauge Co 34 

Estwing Manufacturing Co. . . 39 

Foley Manufacturing 32, 37 

Fugitt, Douglas 38 

Goldblatt Tool Co 29 

Hydrolevel 34 

Harrah Mfg. Co 31 

Irwin Auger Bit Co 31 

Kant Slam Door Check Co. . . 32 

Miller Sewer Rod Co 38 

Riechers, A 37 

Siegele, H. H 34 

Simmons-Board Publishing Co. 36 
Stanley Works Back Cover 



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CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION. Reprinted— ha8 
163 p., 463 il.. covering concrete work, form build- 
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temporary construction. No other hook like it on 
the market. $3.50. 

CARPENTRY.— Has 307 p. 767 il., covering 
general house carpentry, estimating, making win- 
dow and door frames, heavy timber framing, 
trusses, power tools, and other important building 
subiecrs. $3.50. 

CARPENTER'S TOOLS.— Covers sharpening and 
using tools. An important craft problem for each 
tool explained. One of the top-best of my books 
—you should have it. Has 156 p. and 394 il. 

'BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— Has 380 

p. G70 il.. and about 7.000 building trades terms 
and expressions. Defines terms and gives many 
practical building suggestions. You need this 
book. $4.00. 

THE STEEL SQUARE.— Has 192 p., 408 il.. 
covering all important steel-square problems in- 
cluding stairbuilding and roof framing. The most 
practical book on the square sold today. Price 
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CABINETS AND BUI LT-INS.— This new book 
has 102 pages, 193 illustrations, covering kitchen 
cabinets, built-ins, bathroom cabinets, closets, 
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BUILDING.— Has 220 p. and 531 il., covering 
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QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of 
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THE FIRST LEAVES.— Poetry. Only $1.50. 

SPECIAL.— Closing out second edition. TWIGS 
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THE WAILING PLACE.— This book is made up 
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and with 1 book, a poetry hook for half price. 

NOTICE. — Postage paid only when full remittance 
comes with order. No C.O.D. to Canada. 

Order u u cicfcic 222 So. Const. St. 

Today. "• ■"■• 3ICVELC Emporia. Kansas 

BOOKS BOOKS 

— For Birthday gifts, etc. — 



34 



THE CARPENTER 




IN MEMOR1 AM 



L.U. NO. 11, 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Geoffray. Henry 
Jackson, Chris 
Lawson, Stanley 
Micheals, Grover R. 
Quere, Henry 
Smith, H. H. 
Terry, Curtis 
Walz, Otto 

L.U. NO. IS, 
HACKENSACK, N. J. 

Haven, Bernard 
Hawke, Harold 
Hegner. John 
Noller, Frederick 

L.U. NO. 35, 
SAN RAFAEL, 
CALIF. 

King, Arnold 
Parson, Knight 

L.U. NO. 51, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Carlson, Augustus 
Lief, David 
Varnerin, Mario 

L.U. NO. 55, 
DENVER, COLO. 

Jorton, James P. 

L.U. NO. 61, 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Braton, L. S. 
Kapnick, Nathan 
Yeager, Ray A. 

L.U. NO. 94, 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

Allen, William 
Baillie, Robert 
Buldrighini, Joseph 
Henriques, Manuel 
Levin, Jacob 
MacDuff, Milton 
Mullins. Percy 
Rice, George 
Sullivan, Richard 
Tetreault, Henry 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Sheets, Earl W. 

L.U. NO. Ill, 
LAWRENCE, MASS. 

Hmurciak, Stephen 
Jacques, Maurice 

L.U. NO. 121, 
VINELAND, N. J. 

Reeves, Herbert 

L.U. NO. 135, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Eisner, Jacob 
Glasser, Max 
Peres, Jaime 

L.U. NO. 161, 
KENOSHA, WISC. 

Evenson, Herman 
Hazen, James 
Lindstrom, Elmer 
Ostrom, Axel 
Reck, Carl 
Warren, William 



L.U. NO. 174, 
JOLIET, ILL. 

Beltenhausen. Walter C. 

L.U. NO. 183, 
PEORIA, ILL. 

Witherell, Earl 

L.U. NO. 184, 
SALT LAKE CITY, 
UTAH 

Baldwin, Jesse A. 
Brough. Horace 
Frazier, Fred L. 
Hansen, Henry C. 

L.U. NO. 185, 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Maschek, Charles 

L.U. NO. 188, 
YONKERS, N. Y. 

DePalma, Lawrence J. 

L.U. NO. 200, 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Coulter, George 
Fotis, Peter 
Huff, James R. 
Nebel, George 

L.U. NO. 213, 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Chadwick. W. E. 
Eastman, C. A. 
Glen, Charles H. 
Huger, A. F. 
Johnson, Ernest D. 
Lankford, Joe V. 
Ridgeway, Victor 
Rucker, Charles 
Sprowl, Floyd 
Young, Donald B. 

L.U. NO. 224, 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 

Gaskins, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 246, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Frenzel, William 
Kuntschke. Rudolf 
Vogt, Ludwig 

L.U. NO. 257, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Bauman, David S. 
Bilitza, Helmut 
Dorfman, Abe 
Wilis, John 

L.U. NO. 261, 
SCRANTON, PA. 

Schmidt, Arthur H. 

L.U. NO. 266, 
STOCKTON, CALIF. 

Launius, Arlin 
Wysuph, Paul L. 

L.U. NO. 272, 
CHICAGO HEIGHTS, 
ILL. 

Ballou, Edwin 
Cloud, Harry 
Cummins, Lloyd 

L.U. NO. 283, 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Ritz, Walter F. 



L.U. NO. 301, 
NEWBURGH, N. Y. 

Buyer, Edward 
Koechel, Albert R. 

L.U. NO. 308, 
CEDAR RAPIDS, 
IOWA 

Anderson, Christ 
Anderson, Sophus 
Cook, B. W. 
Hill, Elmer 
Howard, Albert 
Jones, Harold 
Klinge, Sophus 
Lazenby, Harley 
Leonard, Dave 
Miller. Rollie 
Nemecek, Wesley 
Smith. Hans J. 
Svoboda, Louis 

L.U. NO. 311, 
JOPLIN, MO. 

Busick, Edgar 
Cartright, Myrl 
Demo, Joseph 
Meers, G. F. 

L.U. NO. 344, 
WAUKESHA, WISC. 

Merten, Herbert 

L.U. NO. 359, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Bennard. Albert 
Gray, Benjamin T. 
Neff, Albert W. 

L.U. NO. 385, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Aita, Armando 
Bayer, Lawrence 
D'Amico, Antonio 
Fabbro, Giovanni 
Falkowski, Joseph 
Larsen, Emil 
Letizia, Carmelo 
Primak, Nathan 
Robertazzi, John 
Taddeo, Giusseppe 
Varano, Luigi 

L.U. NO. 436, 

NEW ALBANY, IND. 

Baker, Walter B. 

L.U. NO. 512, 

ANN ARBOR, MICH. 

Klumpp, Mathew 

L.U. NO. 579, 

ST. JOHN'S, NFLD. 

Hallahan, William 

L.U. NO. 608, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Brinkman, Adolph 

L.U. NO. 627, 

JACKSONVILLE, 

FLA. 

Blount, N. C. 
Bowers, L. C. 
Laurence, Jack H. 
Norris, Charles D. 

L.U. NO. 787, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Berntsen, Axel 
Nepland, Andy 



L.U. NO. 791, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Johnson, August E. 
Karlstrom, Theodore 
Johnson. August E. 
McLaughlin, Edward 

L.U. NO. 808, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Bonn, Leonard 
Oechsner, George 

L.U. NO. 822, 
FINDLAY, OHIO 

Luse, Clarence W. 

L.U. NO. 844, 
CANOGA PARK, 
CALIF. 

Burgess, Walter 
McGeachy, Alvin 
Russell, Robert K. 
Strand, Alfred 

L.U. NO. 946. 
LOS ANGELES, 
CALIF. 

Aldrich, Earnest 
Bush, Fred J. 
Collins. Ralph W. 
Giles, J. P. 
McLeod, R. C. 

L.U. NO. 982, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Behling, Edward 
Tallman, Bert 
Welling, Leo 

L.U. NO. 1162, 
COLLEGE POINT, 

N. Y. 

Laine, Hjalmar 

L.U. NO. 1209, 
NEWARK, N. J. 

Scherer, Charles R. 

L.U. NO. 1323, 
MONTEREY, CALIF. 

Ward, Dale L. 

L.U. NO. 1367, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Devine, Edward 

L.U. NO. 1389, 
WEBSTER CITY, 
IOWA 

Bringolf, Floyd G. 

L.U. NO. 1397. 
ROSLYN, N. Y. 

Fisher, Walter 

L.U. NO. 1423, 
CORPUS CHRISTI, 
TEXAS 

Rackley, F. L. 

L.U. NO. 1449, 
LANSING, MICH. 

Choponis, John 

L.U. NO. 1456, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Ahlroos, Anselm 
Backe, Fritz 



Carlson, Charles 
Cuccinello, Nichold 
DeTemple, Joseph 
Erickson, Evert 
Hendrickson, John 
Hutton, Paul 
Johnson, Albert 
Lutrias, Andrew 
Maloney, Alphonsus 
Martin, John 
Niemi, Arvid 
Penney, William 
Schonwald, Christ 
Wickholm, Einar 

L.U. NO. 1478, 
REDONDO BEACH, 
CALIF. 

Miller, Arthur 
Pierce, Lawrence W. 
Prewitt, Roy 

L.U. NO. 1513, 
DETROIT, MICH 

Helgren, Carl 
Quint, David 

L.U. NO. 1598, 
VICTORIA, B. C. 

Prior, Frederick A. 

L.U. NO. 1613, 
NEWARK, N. J. 

Ciofalo, Vincent 
DePaolo, Alfonse 
Napoliello, Michael 
Pizzi, Vincent 
Ruglio, Tiburzio 

L.U. NO. 1815, 
SANTA ANA, CALIF. 

Duff, George 
Hendrix, William L. 
Hernandez, Lee 
Jordan, Joseph J. 

L.U. NO. 1822, 
FORT WORTH, 
TEXAS 

Ballengall, George 
Clark, Matt W. 
Davis, O. B., Jr. 
Mays, Elmer J. 

L.U. NO. 1913, 
VAN NUYS, CALIF. 
Baker, Henry E. 
Evans, Garviner W. 
Grand, Phillip R. 
Wagner, Joseph 
Williams, Oscar R. 

L.U. NO. 1922, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Frieder, Wendelin 
Kankowski, Robert J. 
Lunblad, Ernest W. 

L.U. NO. 2006, 

LOS GATOS, CALIF. 

Keltner, Herman 
Kitchel, Harvey 
McKee, Smith 
MacKenzie, William 
Morris, George 
Park, Russell 

(Concluded on 
page 36) 



JANUARY, 1965 



35 



You Can Be 
a Highly Paid 

CONSTRUCTION 

COST 

ESTIMATOR 



If you have the ambition to become the top 
man on the payroll — or if you are planning 
to start a successful contracting business of 
your own — we can teach you everything you 
need to know to become an expert construc- 
tion cost estimator. A journeyman carpenter 
with the equivalent of a high schooJ education 
is well qualified to study our easy-to-understand 
home study course, Construction Cost Esti- 
mating. 

WHAT WE TEACH 

We teach you to read plans and specifications, 
take off materials, and figure the costs of ma- 
terials and labor. You prepare complete esti- 
mates from actual working drawings just like 
those you will find on every construction proj- 
ect. You learn how to arrive at the bid price 
that is correct for work in your locality based 
on your material prices and wage rates. Our 
course is self-teaching. After you study each 
lesson you correct your own work by compar- 
ing it to sample estimates which we supply. 
You don't need to send lessons back and forth ; 
therefore you can proceed at your own pace. 
When you complete this course you will know 
how to estimate the cost of all types of con- 
struction : residences, schools, churches, and in- 
dustrial, commercial, and institutional build- 
ings. Our instructions are practical and com- 
plete. We show you exactly how to proceed, 
step by step, from the time you unroll the 
plans until you actually submit your proposal. 

ACCURATE LABOR COST DATA 

The labor cost data which we supply is not 
vague and theoretical — it is correct for work 
in your locality — we leave nothing to guess- 
work. Instead of giving you a thousand rea- 
sons why it is difficult to estimate construction 
costs accurately, we teach you how to arrive 
at a competitive bid price — low enough to get 
the job — high enough to realize a profit. 

STUDY WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

You don't need to pay us one cent until you 
first satisfy yourself that our course is what 
you need and want. We will send you plans, 
specifications, estimate sheets, material and 
labor cost data, and complete instructions for 
ten days study ; then if you are not convinced 
that our course will advance you in the build- 
ing business, just return what we have sent 
you and there is no obligation whatever. Ii 
you decide to study our course, pay us $13.25 
monthly for three months, a total of only 
$39.75. 

Send your name and address today — we will 
do the rest. 



CONSTRUCTION COST INSTITUTE 

Depl. C-l 65— University Station 
Denver, Colorado 80210 



MOD Poster Child 




AFL-CIO President George Meany 
makes his contribution to the 1965 
March of Dimes. Holding the cup is 
1965 Poster Child Mickey Heinicke, four 
years old. 

OREGON MEMBERS 

Continued from page 25 

more years are: Albert Brant, Lark 
Brown, Ivan Corbett, G. N. Fone, Frank 
Groat, Paul Higley, W. C. Kester, Ed- 
ward Klukis, Albert Lindenau, Ted Pat- 
zer, Val Regnicsek, Sherman Smith, A. 
C. Thomas, A. Ueltzen, Harry White, 
C. Brenenstahl, George Cooper, Oliver 
Ethell, L. H. Freeman, Walter Hewitt, 
Bert Kane, Walter Klemp, Eugene Krebs, 
Ralph Maude, Leonard Patzer, Harvey 
Pruitt, Victor Simpson. Kessley Talley, 
Robert Thompson, and Fred Whetstone. 

In Memoriam 

Continued from Page 35 

Tenney, Ezra 
Tolliver, E. A. 
Varnado, Eldon 

L.U. NO. 2073, 
MILWAUKEE, WISC 

Lund, Ole 
Maternowski, Emil 

L.U. NO. 2274, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Dambrosia, James 
Gedekoh, Charles 

Henry 
Riley, Glenn 
Serenko, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 2288, 
LOS ANGELES, 
CALIF. 

Froegel. Edward G. 
Gefre, Thomas 
Parker, Frank O. 
Stuart, T. J. 

L.U. NO. 2435, 

INGLEWOOD, 

CALIF. 

Stanley, John Henry F. 



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36 



THE CARPENTER 



You Can Develop A Profitable 
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SPACE TOOLS 

Continued from Page 14 

Force out of Wright-Patterson Air 
Force Base, have encountered the same 
problems under truly weightless condi- 
tions. Experimenters, tools, and typ- 
ical repair and maintenance work 
mock-ups are all put into the air in- 
side the cabin of a large KC-135 4- 
engine jet. The aircraft builds up 
speed in dives then pulls upward into 
a smooth, arc-like path which lasts 
about 30 seconds. 

While in the arc, everything becomes 
weightless. Cords piled on the floor 
seem to become alive, curling upward. 
Parachute packs lift off the floor, and 
drift gently around the cabin space. 
Although the time of the arc is short, 
personnel and materials are as truly 
weightless as if they were headed for 
Mars. 

In recent tests, airmen attempting to 
use conventional box-end wrenches 
were spun around helplessly by the 
reaction to their own muscle force. 
The zero-reaction power tool, on the 
other hand, enabled other airmen to 
perform simulated work without the 
human pinwheel effect. But it still 
takes more effort. 

Beyond the development of new 
kinds of hand tools, scientists are ex- 
amining ways to handle the more mas- 
sive tasks of space work. Astronauts 
must be able to mate space vehicles, 
capture and repair satellites, and con- 
struct vehicles and way station in mid- 
space. 

To stimulate these gargantuan space 
tasks, some huge test facilities are nec- 
essary. One, recently proposed to the 
Air Force in a Lockheed study, is a 
nine-story-tall simulated space world, 
where full size mock-ups of space vehi- 
cles can be manipulated against a back- 
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the presently popular satellite orbit 
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into the black, lonely void of space, 
he will know that the tools in his hands 
are capable of tackling any emergency 
short of total disaster, helping him to 
get there — and return — with new 
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I Na 



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JANUARY, 1965 



37 



POWER GUN 

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-LAKELAND SLEWS- 

Michael Lavin of Local Union 2250, Red Bank, N. J., arrived at the 
Home November 3, 1964. 

Robert Hayden of Local Union 993, Miami, Fla., arrived at the Home 
November 5, 1964. 

William O. Culbertson of Local Union 985, Gary, Ind., arrived at the 
Home November 11, 1964. 

William Van Hebb of Local Union 340, Hagerstown, Md., arrived at 
the Home November 16, 1964. 

Stephen J. Schemeck of Local Union 81, Erie, Pa., arrived at the 
Home November 17, 1964. 

Carl O. Nordvall of Local Union 361, Duluth, Minn., arrived at the 
Home November 17, 1964. 

William N. Young of Local Union 171, Youngstown, Ohio, arrived 
at the Home November 19, 1964. 

Henry J. Fuhr of Local Union 181, Chicago, 111., arrived at the Home 
November 23, 1964. 

John W. Bennett of Local Union 1856, Philadelphia, Pa., arrived at the 
Home November 25, 1964. 

George Stritter of Local Union 429, Montclair, N. J., arrived at the 
Home November 26, 1964. 

Harry F. Barron of Local Union 1135, Toledo, Ohio, arrived at the 
Home November 30, 1964. 

Minard Hatch of Local Union 105, Cleveland, Ohio, passed away 
November 2, 1964 and was buried in the Home cemetery. His brother 
and daughter attended services. 

August J. Holmberg of Local Union 1693, Chicago, 111., passed away 
November 3, 1964 and burial was at Chicago. 111. 

Charles H. Lubbert of Local Union 1366. Quincy, 111., passed away 
November 5, 1964 and burial was at Quincy, 111. 

Gust F. Newberg of Local Union 58, Chicago, 111., passed away 
November 21, 1964 and was buried in the Home cemetery. His daughter 
and her family attended funeral services. 

Tunis Kievit of Local Union 325, Paterson, N. J., passed away November 
23, 1964 and was buried in the Home cemetery. His daughter attended 
funeral services. 

Samuel R. Manley of Local Union 177, Springfield, Ohio, withdrew 
from the Home November 23, 1964. 

Union Members Who Visited the Home During November 

Leon F. Druse, L.U. 141, Chicago, 111. 

Fred C. Larson, L.U. 1300, San Diego, Calif. 

Jay W. Garnett, L.U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

Gino Koski, L.U. 20, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Sigard L. Johnson, L.U. 982, Harper Woods, Mich. 

W. T. Burns, L.U. 993, Miami, Fla. 

Evon MacFadgen, L.U. 49, Lowell, Mass. 

L. Cummings, L.U. 1108, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Fred Yager, L.U. 146, Scotia, N. Y. 

James V. Gregory, L.U. 2183, Tupelo, Miss. 

R. N. Jones, L.U. 34, San Francisco, Calif. 

E. D. Salgado, L.U. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

Andrew Thergesen, L.U. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bouke Venerna, L.U. 2776, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

O. R. Odell, L.U. 162, Burlingame. Calif. 

Fred Genteman, L.U. 169, E. St. Louis, now living in Belleville, 111. 

Lon A. Thomas, L.U. 329, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

John A. Grumm, L.U. 119, Newark, N. J., now living in Point 
Pleasant, N. J. 

Christ Edwards, L.U. 284, Largo, Fla. 

Alvah Martling, L.U. 1772, Hicksville, N. Y., now living in Bayville, N. Y. 

R. R. Darby, L.U. 132, Damascus, Md. 

C. H. Nething, L.U. 1829, Ravenna, Ohio. 

Vale Kegelein, L.U. 15, Park Ridge, N. J. 

John Plaxco, L.U. 1585, Lawton, Okla. 

Leland M. Adkins, L.U. 1876, Salisbury, Md. 

Paul Petrazf, L.U. 246, New York City, N. Y. 

George Brueggemeier, L.U. 1643, Chagrin Falls, Ohio, now living in 
Euclid, Ohio. 

George Carlson, L.U. 493, Mt. Vernon, N. Y., now living in Wake 
Forest, N. C. 

Concluded on Page 39 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



LAKELAND NEWS, Continued from Page 38 

Edward Bordovosky, L.U. 1786. Chicago, 111. 

James E. Roberts, L.U. 1590, Silver Spring, Md. 

James K. Wallace, L.U. 1664, Bloomington. Ind. 

John A. Speeks, L.U. 1590, Washington, D. C. 

Joseph Van Ostenbridge, L.U. 325, Hawthorne, N. J. 

Tom Swift, L.U. 1784, Chicago, 111. 

Charles Guillemette. L.U. 134, Montreal. Que. 

Harry C. Petee, L.U. 735, Mansfield, Ohio. 

Gunnar A. Fredrickson, L.U. 1456, Hampstead, N. H. 

Arthur F. Mannering, L.U. 485, Christopher, 111. 

Hjalmar Gabrielson, L.U. 1, Chicagp, 111. 



SOCIAL SECURITY — Questions and Answers 



Q. If a single person dies and both par- 
ents are dead, can a sister, brother, 
nephew or niece draw this person's 
social security? 

A. The social security lump sum death 
benefit will be paid to whoever pays 
the funeral bill. 

Q. I will be 62 on Nov. 13, 1964. I have 
worked 13 years under social security. 
Can you tell me how much I can get? 
My husband, age 73, is dependent on 
me. How much can he get from my 
social security? 

A. Social security benefits may be paid 
to you and your husband if he is 
more than 50 per cent dependent on 
you. The amount of the benefit is 
determined by your monthly average 
wage. For an estimate, contact your 
local social security office. 

Q. I was born in Lancaster, S. C, in 
1902. My birthday was February 15 
and I am now age 62. At the time I 
was born there were no birth certifi- 
cates issued in Lancaster. How can 
I receive a wife's benefit without my 
birth certificate? 

A. A birth certificate is not absolutely 
necessary to prove age. Other docu- 
ments may be used. These may in- 
clude a baptismal certificate, census 
record, school record, age given on 
' marriage license, voting record, insur- 
ance policy, just to name a few. Con- 
tact your local social security office 
for further information. 

Q. I worked 12 years and paid social 
security. My husband died January 
1963. I was told I could not draw 
social security until age 62. I am 
now 60 years of age. When I become 
62, can I draw any of my husband's 
social security? 

A. When you reach age 62, you may 
draw either on your own record or 
82Vi per cent of your husband's 
amount, monthly. You will be paid 
the larger of the two benefits. We 
presume you have already received 
the lump sum death payment. 

Q. I was born in December 1904 and 
have worked under social security 
since 1937. I plan to retire in Feb- 
ruary. Do I have enough quarters 
and what percentage would I receive? 



A. You have enough quarters. The 
amount is determined by your wages. 
Contact your local social security 
office for an estimate. 

Q. I am now 59 years old and have 
worked under social security ever 
since it started. I plan to retire at 
age 62. I am unemployed at the pres- 
ent time and having trouble finding 
work. How much more time would 
I have to put in to be eligible fori 
social security or do I already have 
enough quarters? 

A. Anyone who has 10 years or 40 
quarters of coverage is insured for 
life for all benefits. 

Q. I was born in November 1901 and 
have worked from July 2, 1959 until 
November 11, 1961. That would be 
9 full quarters. How many more 
quarters will I need to get Social Se- 
curity? If I take it at a reduced rate 
at age 63, will I have to continue at 
the reduced rate? 

A. You have a possible 9 quarters. You 
need 12 quarters. If you accept re- 
duced benefits, they will remain re- 
duced even after you reach age 65. 

Q. I was in social security from its 
beginning until January 7, 1942. Then 
I went into government work and 
Civil Service. I am 58 years old, plan 
to retire at age 62. Will I receive 
any social security benefits as well 
as my Civil Service retirement? 

A. It appears that you may have 21 
quarters of coverage. This will keep 
you fully insured until 1972. Since 
you are a male worker, if you reach 
age 65 in 1971, you will need 20 
quarters, if you reach age 65 in 1972, 
you will need 21 quarters of cover- 
age. 

Q. My wife and I are both on social 
security. We are both past 73 years 
of age. We had to take over a busi- 
ness and are operating it. Do we 
have to pay social security tax on our 
net earnings as self-employed per- 
sons? 

A. Yes, you will have to pay the self- 
employment tax as long as you have 
annual profits of $400.00 or more. 
This work however, will not effect 
the receipt of your benefits as you are 
both over 72. 



Estwing 

Hammers 

Last Longer 
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Dept. C-l Rockford, III. 



JANUARY, 1965 



39 



TWIT 
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M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 



A BACK HANDED COMPLIMENT, BUT A COMPLIMENT NO LESS 



In A RECENT ISSUE of the American Teacher, 
official publication of the American Federation of 
Teachers, I ran across a thought-provoking letter. It 
was written by a member of the union employed in a 
district where the union did not have bargaining rights. 

His complaint was that the National Education As- 
sociation, a professional association to which teachers 
belong, negotiated a wage increase by telling the school 
authorities the teachers would join the union (AFT) 
if a wage increase was not forthcoming. This, the 
writer of the letter maintained, was unfair to the 
teachers union. 

It is not hard to see how the writer could be angry 
over such a deceptive tactic on the part of NEA. There 
was an element of dirty pool involved. 

A little sober reflection, however, reveals that the 
writer of the letter should be pleased rather than angry 
over the fact that the mere threat of bringing in the 
teachers' union could result in an increase in wages. 
No finer compliment could be paid the union. 

Basically, unions are responsible for all wage in- 
creases, whether they are negotiated by the unions or 
not. Employers — whether they are private employers 
or government officials — know that they cannot allow 
wages to get too far out of line with union wages. 

We are constantly running across instances where 
a group of workers asks our union to represent them. 
They then notify the employer there is union activity 
in the plant or on the job-site. Often the employer 
responds by granting the men a wage increase and im- 
provements in working conditions. The employees take 
these gains and promptly forget about forming an 
organization. 



This, of course, is discouraging, but it only empha- 
sizes the fact that only the union has the know-how 
to negotiate improvements in wages and working con- 
ditions. 

Workers who use the threat of forming a union to 
gain wage increases are merely free-loading. They use 
the union to get what they want, but when they do 
not follow through to the point of actually forming a 
union, they capitalize on the efforts of those who carry 
the ball. In the long run their gains are strictly tempo- 
rary. By one means or another, the employer can 
eventually chisel away all that he granted, if there is 
no union to protect conditions on a day-to-day basis. 

While I can sympathize with the teacher who wrote 
the letter I referred to in the beginning, I can honestly 
say that his gripe is not unique. There are always peo- 
ple in the world willing to capitalize on the efforts of 
others without contributing anything themselves. Until 
human nature changes, this condition will continue to 
prevail. 

However, every union man who is honest with him- 
self knows that he is protecting the living and working 
standards of his trade. He is contributing to the ad- 
vancement of his craft and he is holding up his end, 
as every honest citizen should. The free-rider remains 
on the periphery of the good life, picking up the 
crumbs that fall his way from the main table of col- 
lective bargaining. As long as he is satisfied with the 
crumbs, there is little anybody can do about it. The 
hope lies in the fact that sooner or later he will learn 
that more than crumbs are available to those who are 
willing to thresh the wheat and carry in the fodder. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 




E3H 




Mystified Male 

One riddle, dear ladies, still stumps 

me, I swear, 
Though I've pondered since boyhood 

upon it. 
Just why, when you claim you have 

nothing to wear, 
Does it take you forever to don it? 

BE UNION— BUY LABEL 




Headed for Trouble! 

An apprentice on his first job was 
told to shingle the side of a barn. 
Soon the foreman saw him throwing 
nails over his shoulder and yelled: 
"What are you doing?" 

"Oh, their heads were on the wrong 
ends" replied the apprentice. 

"Don't be stupid!" replied the 
foreman. "You've gotta shingle the 
other side of the barn too!" 

BUY ONLY UNION TOOLS 

Interne Upturn 

The fellow next to the carpenter 
on the subway kept muttering: "Call 
me a doctor . . . call me a doctor . . . 
call me a doctor." 

"Whassamatta?" asked the car- 
penter, "You sick?" 

"No," replied the character, "I just 
graduated from medical school!" 
— H. H., 
LU. 2155 



Some Black Magic! 

This young fellow was driving along 
the highway when he saw a good-look- 
ing female hitchhiker. He picked her 
up and, as they rode along, she con- 
fided that she was, in reality, a witch, 
and could make him turn into any- 
thing she wished. This proved to be 
true. After he had driven a little 
farther, he turned into a country lane! 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 



Mr. Pert Sez: 

A lotta folk stayed home from th' 
last election. They got so confused 
they couldn't make up their own 
minds. I reckon it was a good thing; 
who wants folks that stupid helpin' to 
make important decisions? 

UNION DUES — TOMORROW'S SECURITY 

Too True! 

Street sign near a school: "Drive 
Carefully. Look Out For Children. 
Especially Those Driving Automo- 
biles." 

BE UNION— BUY LABEL 

Educational TV 

Married man to good-looking bach- 
elor: "How in the worfd have you 
been able to stay single so long?" 

Bachelor: "It's easy. Every time I 
look at television I know tens of mil- 
lions of women are anemic and over- 
weight and have stringy hair, large 
pores and rough hands." 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■I 

This Month's Limerick 

There was a young lady named Ginter 
Who married a man in the winter. 
The man's name was Wood 
And now, as they should, 
The Woods have a cute little splinter. 
— John T. Freeman, Sr., 
San Francisco. 

(We need printable Iimerick9.) 



Too Fat for Him! 

Readers might enjoy this letter 
from San Francisco even more than 
the joke: 

"Dear Gentlemen: I have read your 
gossip page ever since my daddy re- 
ceived Carpenter. I have a gossip 
comic. Could you see if you could 
get my comic in? I would sure ap- 
preciate it if you would. I am eight 
years old and in H-3 (High Third). 
My daddy is Mr. Melvin Albert Van 
Fosson. And if not call DE 3-9199. 
Thank you. Sincerely, Beverly Van 
Fosson." 

Man (enter) "May I have two 
rooms please?" 

Clerk: "Sure, but why two?" 

Man: "One for me and one for 
my wife." 

Clerk: "Can't you use one?" 

Man: "No! My wife's too fat!" 

UNITED WE STAND 




It's All Relative! 

Speaking of gloomy mornings, how 
about the one when J. Paul Getty 
woke up feeling like a million? 
— J. C. Grant, 

St. Catherines, Ont. 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

The Awful Truth 

My husband is a carpenter, 
A handy man is he. 
He helps out all the neighbors 
But he has no time for me. 

— E. Francis, 
Havertown, Pa. 




STANLEY LIFE GUARD YELLOW 
RULES . . . measurably better! 

LONGER WEARING . . . Last up to 10 times longer. A special super- 
tough finish resists abrasion, abuse and hard use. 

VISIBLY BETTER . . . Black numbers on yellow background are easier 
to see, easier to read. 

POWERLOCK ... A new Power Return Rule. Powerlock locks on blade, 
prevents slippage in either direction. 

SEE YOUR DEALER ... He has the right LIFE GUARD YELLOW Rule 
for every measuring job as well as other fine Stanley Tools. Made by 
STANLEY TOOLS, Division of The Stanley Works, New Britain, 
Connecticut. In Canada: Hamilton, Ontario. 



STANLEY 



THE TOOL BOX OF THE WORLD 




What's so different about the newest? 

Power return tape rules with their smooth 
blade action are just about the handiest 
of all measuring tools . . . and hand tool 
users are recognizing this by their pur- 
chases. When Stanley designers 
developed the brand new Powerlock Rule, 
they combined the advantages of Life 
Guard Yellow visibility and service life 
with a whole host of convenience fea- 
tures. For instance: 



POSITIVE LOCKING BLADE 



Lock action is on blade, 
not on drum. No 
creeping or slippage 
back into case. 






LAY IT ON ITS SIDE 



Rule lies flat, easy to mark off. Blade 
stays put; doesn't snap back. 



HOOK THAT 
"GRIPS" 



The serrations and burrs are there for 
a purpose ... they help prevent hook 
from slipping off smooth surfaces, and 
it's the strongest hook ever. Even a 100 
pound pull will not cause it to bend. 



IV 

FOR "INSIDE" MEASURING 

Extend rule just short of width to be 
measured; then extend slightly to full 
distance. Add two inches for width of 
case. 






When taking inside or outside measure- 
ments, the hook automatically slides to 
precisely allow for hook thickness. It's 
always at "true zero." 



Belt Clip 

furnished 

with 

POWERLOCK 

RULE! 



Clip is screwed to back of case. 
Fastens rule to belt, pocket, work 
apron or clip board. Keeps rule 
at your fingertips, prevents mis- 
placement. 




It is everything, or every- 
thing is nothing. It is the catalyst 
that separates a human bein g from the 
beast of the jungle. It ^M^leavening of 
love and the scaffolding upon which society 
rests. 1 1 is t he glowing light which has beckoned 
mankind along the tortuous path of pre 
from the law of the fang to the Bill of Rights. 
It is the cornerstone of Democracy and 
the fountainhead of human dignity. It 
is the strength of the past and the hope 
of the future. / It is the biggest thing in the 
world and at the same time the smallest. It is 
a thousand union men walking a picket line for 
weeks or months to redress an injustice done to a 
single member. But also it is a housewife baking a 
cake for an ailing neighbor. It is battered and beaten 
GI's with bone-weary arms and frozen feet carrying 
wounded comrades out of the frigid wastes of Korea. 
But also it is a vigorous young carpenter giving a lift 
to a tired oldtimer working by his side. It is a 
hundred and fifty million people placing their homes, 
their savings and >?ven their lives at the disposal of 
the nation to protect the principles of liberty and 
equality. But no less it is Bill Smith mowing the lawn 
of the old couple up the street. It is a dozen or a 
hundred or a thousand people working together to 
maintain a church or a lodge or a union. It is the 
fifty cent contribution or the hour of committee 
work given by the least of them. / It is the wisdom 
of Lincoln and the warmth of Gandhi. It is the 
humility of Jesus, the humbleness of Mohammed 
and the humanitarianism of Confucius. 
It is Catholic and Protestant and Jew- 
living together in peacefulness and 
harmony. It is Italian and Dane and 
Bulgarian and Pole working side by 
side on the job and sitting shoulder to 
shoulder in the union hall searching 
for ways to advance the common good. 
It is the Ten Commandments and the 



WHAT 

IS 

BROTHERHOOD 
? 



THAT 

IS 

BROTHERHOOD 



Sermon on the Mount. 
It is I he Bible, the Talmud and the 
Koran. ^^j^ie essence of all wisdom of all 
ages distilled into a single word. But equally 
it is the understanding of neighbors and 
friends who sorrow at your misfortunes and' 
rejoice at your triumphs. You cannot see 
Brotherhood; neither can you hear it or taste 
it. But you can feel it a hundred times 
a day. It is the pat on the back when 
things look gloomy. It is the smile of 
encouragement when the way seems hard. It is the 
helping hand when the burden becomes unbearable. / 
It is pioneer Americans of faiths and creeds and colors 
banding together to raise a barn for a neighbor. It is 
men in leather breeches and homespun shirts taking 
wagons apart and carrying them over the mountains, 
piece by piece, to get wagon trains into California and 
Oregon. It is working men risking their jobs, their 
homes and their futures to build unions capable of 
eliminating exploitation and poverty and industrial 
slavery. It is men and women working for a common 
cause that is bigger than any individual. / It is the 
hope of mankind for immortality. Man comes into the 
world from whence he knows not. He struggles a 
while and departs again into whence he knows not. 
But like the tiny Crustacea which create the mag- 
nificent coral reefs, he makes a tiny contribution 
to the universal plan. The coral comes into the world, 
lives awhile, and then dies to add its tiny skeleton 
to the skeletons of millions of generations which went 
before. In the end, a beautiful coral island rises out 
of the sea. Like the coral, man comes 
into the world to live awhile and even- 
tually pass on. Like the coral, he makes 
his contribution to the universal plan. 
Brotherhood is the mortar that holds 
together the contributions of all men in 
all ages. / It is not life. It is more 
than that. It is that which gives mean- 
ing to life and makes it worth living. 



COURTESY UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA / TEXT BY PETER TERZICK y DESIGN BY JACK LEINER 



THE 



SM^PSETirBlja 



VOLUME LXXXV 



NO. 2 



FEBRUARY, 1965 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Acting Editor 



iLJBOa PBESSl 



"1 ' ' 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Headquarters is Hub of Improvement Plans 

The Time for Action on Legislation is Now 

Cost Crisis in Elderly Insurance Erupts Sidney Margolius 1 1 

Man's Life Span 13 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 9 

Editorials '2 

Leveling on the Issues 15 

Canadian Section 18 

Your Social Security 21 

We Congratulate 22 

Plane Gossip 23 

Local Union News 25 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 34 

In Memoriam 36 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 

Official Information Inside Back Cover 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N. E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20f in advance. 

17 . , .■ 17 

Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

Canada has a new flag — a red maple 
leaf on a white field with a vertical 
red bar at each side. 

The new flag was proposed by 
Prime Minister Lester Pearson's Lib- 
eral Government. 

The new flag was designed in an 
effort to smooth over the differences 
between French and English elements 
in the population. 

French Canadians, nearly one third 
of the country's 19-million popula- 
tion, have long resented the British 
symbols in Canada's flag, and they 
are joined in this by many English- 
speaking Canadians who feel their 
nationhood should be expressed by 
a truly distinctive emblem. The major 
factor of discontent over Mr. Pear- 
son's flag is not so much that it is 
new, but the fact that almost every 
Canadian over the last decade or so 
has settled in his own mind just what 
the new flag should be and there are 
just that number of designs, colors, 
etc. 

Actually. Canadians grew up under 
two flags — Britain's Union Jack, and 
what was, in effect, the British mer- 
chant flag (the Old Red Duster, hav- 
ing the Jack in the canton) surcharged 
with Canada's coat-of-arms. And al- 
though flags have not been carried into 
battle for generations, these were 
Canada's flags in two great wars. 

This new banner will be the first 

distinctive national flag in Canada's 

Continued on Page 19 


















A** 



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A model of Ihc plan for revitalizing "(lie 
grand axis of a great capital city" as 
drawn up by (lie President's Council on 
Pennsylvania Avenue. In the lower left 
corner is the White House, .lust above 
the White House is the U. S. Treasury. 
The Council proposes that a "National 
Square" be constructed cast of the Treas- 
ury, as shown near the center of the pic- 
ture. Pennsylvania Avenue is the long 
diagonal thoroughfare leading to the 
Capitol, at the top of the picture. Many 
small stores and restaurants now line the 
left side of the avenue. 



PHOTO CREDITS: Picture of model at left by 
Louis Check/nan, Jersey City, N. J. 
The aerial photo below from Parkwood, Inc. 
The drawing below is from the Report of the 
President's Council on Pennsylvania Avenue. 
Photo on Page 4 is from the National Archives. 



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In the white square of the aerial photo- 
graph at right can be seen the Brother- 
hood Headquarters (at the top of the 
square) and the Esso Building and park- 
ing area, which was purchased recently 
by a financial syndicate. The black square 
in the drawing (opposite page) shows the 
same area, but it indicates how a pro- 
posed traffic artery would run under- 
ground at the tract to come out beyond 
the Capitol Mall. 




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"NE of the fascinating stories about 
the late President John F. Kennedy 
concerns his comments one day as he 
departed from the magnificent new 
District of Columbia stadium. As he 
walked briskly down the long ramp, 
he turned to the stadium official walk- 
ing beside him and said: 

'"Some day I want to talk to you 
about the concessions here." 

Worried, the official replied: "What 
is it, Mr. President? Can't we talk 
about it now?" Kennedy was about to 
enter his limousine by then, but he 
paused a minute and summed up his 
observations in a succinct 14 words: 

"The hot dogs aren't hot and the 
Cokes have too much ice in them." 



Unfortunately, history must record 
that his criticism went in vain. But 
Kennedy was certainly one of the 
most all-observing men to sit in the 
White House since Thomas Jefferson. 
He was riding down Pennsylvania 
Avenue toward the Capitol to take his 
oath of office on January 20, 1961. 
Looking to his left, he saw a clutter 
of liquor stores, other catchpenny 
emporiums of little repute, gaudy sur- 
plus stores, cheap furniture stores, and 
distasteful shabbiness of all kinds. 
Even in this, his greatest moment, it 
did not escape his notice. Shortly 
after becoming President he set the 
wheels in motion to "get something 
done about Pennsylvania Avenue." 



fub of Improvement Plans 



*^*f& 




Ivania Avenue, A Vital New Traffic 
jft^|^d[ydssy^^tv Labor Department Building Next 
MJilf^rvry] J Eiift^(je Location of Brotherhood Building 

Pennsylvania Avenue, 160 feet 
fyide. is "The Grand Avenue" of the 
United States. It surpasses Broadway 
New York. Market Street in San 
rancisco. Canal Street in New Or- 
eans, Michigan Boulevard in Chi- 
o. Some are grander, some are 
wider, some are longer, but Penn- 
sylvania Avenue has the unique attri- 
bute of being steeped in such history 
' none other possesses. In addition, 
iting dignitaries may or may not see 
T any of the others but they invariably 
f'ji^pe "The Avenue." 

Here is where America honors its 
/"jiving idols and mourns its dead 
•0»" heroes. 

But it has been a continuing "prob- 
lem path" since Pierre L'Enfant de- 
signed the Federal City in 1 800. The 
t ... .French major in the Corps of Engi- 
" tigers had fought with the patriots in 
5= ■---, the Revolutionary War. Thomas Jef- 
r ^.fejson, that well of fertile ideas, who 
V^wts himself to ride up "The Avenue" 
as President, was sketching plans for 
a Federal City when L'Enfant offered 



is services to President Washington, 
_^and they were accepted. 

* The idea was that the landowners 
\* Would deed part of their acreages to 
jrJtne Federal Government for building 

Tr 







-''V 4,1 y^j, 





lots and the remainder of their acre- 
age would be so enhanced in value that 
they would be more than repaid for the 
value of the land thus deeded away. 
This had been done before (and would 
be done again) and was the founda- 
tion of many early fortunes in the 
emerging nation. 

L'Enfant planned his city with radi- 
ating avenues cutting at angles across 
a square grid of lesser streets with 
circles at the intersections where artil- 
lery could be placed to command the 
approaches to the city should an in- 
vading army ever approach. 

He placed the Capitol on the high 
hill where it now stands. Other public 
buildings, including the President's 
House, he planned to locate east of 
Capitol Hill on high ground, for west 
of the hill was a tidal swamp and the 
sluggish Tiber Creek. 

But greedy landowners east of the 
Capitol sought to profiteer, and L'En- 
fant, enraged, turned his plan around 
and, even after the Capitol had been 
built, arranged for the President's 
House to be located where it is now, 
the draining of Tiber Creek, filling 
where the Mall now exists, and a long 
and dramatically-wide avenue to con- 
nect the Capitol and the President's 
House which was to be Pennsylvania 
Avenue. He proposed, literally, to 
leave the greedy land speculators on 
the high ground east of the Capitol 
"high and dry." 

That is why, today, the front of 
the Capitol faces East, away from the 
White House and downtown Washing- 
ton. 

But there was a serious hitch. One 
prominent landowner refused to give 
up his land at the intersection of 
Pennsylvania Avenue and Fifteenth 
Street, where the Treasury Building 
now stands. He started building a 
mansion there. L'Enfant, acting with 
what might possibly be considered 
temerity, sent in a crew which tore 
down the partially-completed house. 
This was a fatal mistake. Many 
prominent landowners and influential 
men called on President Washington 
and protested. They succeeded in in- 
fluencing Washington to remove L'En- 
fant. The landowner went ahead and 
built his house. Pennsylvania Avenue 
came to an abrupt end at his front 
gate. 

That is why, to this date, Pennsyl- 
vania Avenue continues in a broad 
and straight line from the Capitol to 
Fifteenth Street, then disappears. One 
must detour one block north and pick 
up Pennsylvania Avenue again as it 
proceeds on to the west. Perhaps, 
some day, The Treasury Building will 



come down and Pennsylvania Avenue 
will continue in its broad majesty 
right to the White House as originally 
planned, but it certainly will he many, 
many years in the future, if ever, 
before L'Enfant's dream will be real- 
ized. 

The Avenue began to take on a 
shabby appearance as early as 1900. 
At that time a Senate Committee was 
named to study the problem, along 
with the general problem of Washing- 
ton's major streets and parks. The 
result was the McMillan Report, issued 
in 1901 which noted, among other 
items, a need to clean up the Potomac 
River and its banks, a project still in 
the talking stage. 

At that time railroad trains chugged 
across the Mall, and there was a rail- 
road depot located just down the hill 
from the Capitol. This irritated Pres- 
ident Theodore Roosevelt and he in- 
structed the appropriate official to dis- 
mantle it. Sometime later a Congress- 
man noticed that the railroad station 
was missing, called in the responsible 
official, and asked him by whose au- 
thority he had removed the station. 

"By the President's authority," he 
replied. Certain members of Congress 
were outraged and pointed out that 
the President had no authority to 
undertake such expenses unless Con- 
gress first voted the money. 

The ex-Rough Rider, a man of ac- 
tion, called in the complaining Con- 
gressmen and informed them that the 
station had been an eyesore on the 
Mall, that he had personally ordered 
it removed, and that the salvage real- 
ized from the proceeds had more than 
paid for the expenses of removal. The 
White House was sending a check to 
the Treasury Department for the prof- 
it, and that, in so many words, they 
should shut up. 

North of Pennsylvania Avenue, 
Washington is quite like any other 
city. It has a conglomeration of com- 
mercial buildings and hotels. Farther 
north there is a "transition area" of 
parking lots, run-down private homes, 
cheap hotels and the like. 

Still farther north are mostly noth- 
ing but homes interlaced with a few 
commercial complexes. Most of the 
homes are something less than grand 
and many are approaching the status 
of slums. Urban renewal is a crying 
need but so far this effort has been re- 
stricted to the areas southeast and 
southwest of the Capitol. 

Most of the Federal Buildings are 
south of Pennsylvania Avenue. They 
extend to the Mall, jump across it, and 
continue almost to the Potomac. Plan- 




Pierre L'Enfant designed the Federal City. 

ners like to point out that intelligent 
concentration of the chief buildings 
has consistently resulted in the gran- 
deur of great cities throughout history, 
such as Athens, Florence, Venice, 
Budapest, Paris and Moscow. 

Washington, on the other hand, has 
grandeur on the south of its "Grand 
Avenue" and grime on the north. 
What can be done about it? 

Next to legislators, the most-numer- 
ous type of Washingtonian is "The 
Expert." There are about seven and 
a half pages of listings of associations 
relating to every conceivable subject 
in the yellow pages of the city's tele- 
phone book. No matter what subject 
is publicly broached, there are im- 
mediately myriad specialists quoted, 
each varying in opinion from the 
others. For every eminently-qualified 
specialist on any given subject, there 
is another, equally-well-qualified, who 



will take an exactly opposite view- 
point and quote other specialists to 
support him. 

So it has been with Washington's 
urban problems. When urban renewal 
was broached, there were specialists 
confuting specialists. When access 
roads were broached, the result was 
similar. Complicating the roads prob- 
lem is the fact that the District of 
Columbia is sandwiched between 
Maryland, with two contiguous county 
governments, and Virginia, with an- 
other couple of like governments. 

Now the plan is to update Pennsyl- 
vania Avenue's northern facade but 
everyone in a position to know some- 
thing about it, and enough authority 
to speak on the subject, seems to speak 
with a different accent. 

Some experts would like the gov- 
ernment to buy the property from its 
present private owners, tear down 
existing structures, and build govern- 
ment office buildings on the sites, 
which will give dignity of a federal 
character to both sides of "The Grand 
Avenue." This would be an extremely 
costly program; so costly that, for 
private interests, it would not be 
economically feasible. 

Is there a need for Federal build- 
ings from Fifteenth Street to the Capi- 
tol'/ Perhaps not now, but Parkinson's 
Law certainly would take care of the 
situation within a reasonable length 
of time. Parkinson was an English 
economist who stated that, in a bu- 
reaucracy, the work always expands 
to fill any available space. 

Is it desirable? Some planners de- 
clare it would bring only more death- 




Headquarters of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, looking toward Capitol Hill from the Esso Building. 



THE CARPENTER 



liness to an already-dead downtown 
Washington. Because of the inroads 
on their clientele by the suburban 
shopping centers, downtown Washing- 
ton retailers are feeling an economic 
pinch. Those large and prosperous 
enough to do so have built suburban 
branches, some of which do more 
sales volume than the parent down- 
town store. 

One of the proposals to "Save 
downtown Washington" has come 
from noted architect and city planner 
Louis Justement, who has suggested 
that the old-dilapidated buildings 
come down and that apartment houses 
go up. A fellow of the American 
Institute of Architects, he reasons that 
this will provide downtown Washing- 
ton with living people who will be able 
to patronize theaters, stores, restau- 
rants, and other retail establishments 
at night, bringing new life to the 
downtown area which, at present, 
largely closes down shortly after the 
offices close their doors. 

But there is a fly in the ointment 
designed to heal the Avenue's hurt; 
the height limitation on Washington's 
buildings. Because planners do not 
want to see the lofty Capitol Dome 
dwarfed by skyscrapers, planners have 
succeeded in writing into the build- 
ing code a height limitation of 130 
feet in the downtown area. When 
land values are about $100 a square 
foot or more along Pennsylvania Ave- 
nue, one cannot build an apartment 
house of only about 12 to 13 stories 
and expect to make out financially 
unless such apartments would rent 
for something like $200 a room per 
month. Few people working south 
of the Avenue could pay that much 
to live across the street! 

If the height limitation were to be 
raised, the ground floor of a building 
on the north side of Pennsylvania 
Avenue could house a commercial 
endeavor such as a drug store, de- 
partment store, art gallery, or any type 
of retail establishment. Perhaps the 
second and several succeeding floors 
could house offices (they would be 
greatly in demand by lobbying organ- 
izations whose interests lie across the 
avenue!) and then, in the top-most 
floors, apartments. 

But the plan which Justement criti- 
cizes does not envision apartments to 
bring more people into downtown 
Washington. It would, as stated, build 
more Federal buildings on the north 
side of the avenue. It would have 
two grand squares at each end with 
trees and pedestrian platforms. 

Many experts declare trees should 
be "out" and they point out that lush 



foliage on each side of the route of 
a ceremonial parade effectively screens 
it from those who would watch it. 
What would a ticker-tape trip down 
Broadway look like if giant elms 
arched over that venerable thorough- 
fare? 

The proposal Justement criticizes 
would destroy the venerable old Wil- 
lard Hotel, where Lincoln stayed while 
awaiting his inaugural. Traffic north 
and south would be routed under the 
avenue in tunnels and a 10,000-car 
underground garage is contemplated. 

The plan had been ordered drawn 
up by President Kennedy and was 
being completed on Nov. 22, 1963, 
the day he was assassinated. It was 
then presented to President Johnson 
on May 31, 1964. 

Justement says that President Ken- 
nedy had instructed his planners "not 




Noted architect and city planner, Louis 
Justement, warns of possible "ghost area." 

to line the north side with a solid 
phalanx of public and private office 
buildings which close down completely 
at night and on weekends, leaving the 
Capitol more isolated than ever." 
This, however, is just what they have 
done," Justement declares. He asserts 
that the planners are deliberately 
"planning a ghost town." Apartments 
in the area would not displace any 
present residents and would introduce 
as many as 20,000 persons who would 
carry on their life activities in the area 
at night and on the weekends, he 
said. Present commercial ventures in 
the area could move back into the 
ground floors of the new buildings if 
they so desired (and could afford the 
ground rents). 

Justement additionally criticized the 
large ceremonial blocks planned for 
both ends of the avenue, saying they 
would create fantastic traffic bottle- 
necks and would only be "traversed 
by an occasional pedestrian." A pro- 
posed fountain in the middle of the 
western "supersquare" would block the 



view of a White House gate and ef- 
fectively shield parades from onlook- 
ers. Justement stresses that he speaks 
as an individual, not as a representa- 
tive of any organization. 

The proposed plans for rejuvena- 
tion of Pennsylvania Avenue would 
not continue as far west as the Brother- 
hood building, which is located at the 
juncture of Constitution and Pennsyl- 
vania Avenues and 2nd St., N.W. The 
latter runs north and south at the west 
end of the Brotherhood building and, 
across the street, is a 3 14 -acre site 
which recently sold for a reported $9 
million. This site has been said to 
be under consideration for building a 
new Department of Labor Building, 
now located on Constitution Avenue 
at Fourteenth Street, the extreme 
southwest corner of the "Federal Tri- 
angle." The already enviable location 
of our Brotherhood's headquarters 
would be immeasurably enhanced 
should the Department of Labor be- 
come our next-door neighbor. How- 
ever, the tract stands in the path of 
a proposed expressway to speed north 
and south traffic through downtown 
Washington. It is scheduled to tunnel 
beneath the Capitol grounds. Consti- 
tution Avenue and The Mall and it is 
conceivable that, if the Labor Depart- 
ment should build on the tract, the 
highway would also go below (or 
through) such a building. Air rights 
over superhighways, railroad rights-of- 
way and piers are becoming increas- 
ingly desirable as land values in con- 
gested areas continue to skyrocket. 

Construction of such a superhigh- 
way immediately west of the Brother- 
hood office might pose problems in 
connection with access to the present 
parking area on our property but, no 
doubt, such problems would not be 
insoluble. Congress is expected to pro- 
vide funds to buy land and build the 
new Labor Department building dur- 
ing the current session. 

When President Johnson rode up 
Pennsylvania Avenue last January 20, 
he rode past disreputable storefronts 
and the aging facades of rickety old 
19th-century structures. It is entirely 
likely that whoever takes that ride in 
January, 1969, may find the view to 
the north considerably improved or in 
the course thereof. President Johnson's 
"Great Society" program calls for the 
United States Government to make 
the best showing possible before the 
eyes of visiting dignitaries. Whether 
they look at federal buildings or stores- 
offices-apartments structures on the 
north side of Pennsylvania Avenue, 
even the disputing experts agree that 
the surplus stores are surplus. 



FEBRUARY, 1965 



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The Time for Action is Now, 
Labor Tells the 89th Congress ¥ 




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Irotherhood leaders join more 
than 800 delegates from unions 
all over the nation in Washington 
conference to push legislation 




5* 



Right: President George Meany of the 

AFL-CIO gives keynote speech to 

conference, setting forth the program of 

legislation which labor desires. 



Below: Over-all view of the 800 delegates 
to the legislative conference held in the 
Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D. C. ft 



* AFL- 
LEGISUmVE CONFERENCE 




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ORGANIZED LABOR has served 
emphatic notice on the 89th Con- 
gress that "now is the time for action." 
The legislators were so advised in the 
course of a four-day AFL-CIO Legis- 
lative Conference held in Washington, 
D. C, a few days prior to the Presiden- 
tial Inauguration. 

There were 800 delegates from all 
over the nation in attendance at the 
sessions in the Mayflower Hotel as 
AFL-CIO President George Meany 
delivered his keynote speech in which 
he called on the Congress to enact 
what he termed "The People's Pro- 
gram." 

The delegates, who had gathered in 
the nation's capital representing their 
national and international unions and 
central bodies, were told the legisla- 
tive facts of life by White House, 
Congressional and trade union special- 
ists. In addition, the delegates called 
on their Congressmen and Senators 
in their Capitol Hill offices during the 
third day of the four-day meet. They 
told the legislators what organized 
labor was seeking, urged "The People's 
Program" on them, and pointed out 
that the people back home who voted 
them into their present offices would 
be watching with considerable interest 
how they voted as the various articles 
of needed legislation were brought 
before the Congress. 

Vice President Hubert Humphrey, 
then Vice President-elect, gave a com- 
prehensive speech to the delegates in 
which he pointed out that the help of 
every member of organized labor 
would be needed if the program they 
seek is to be carried out without a 
hitch. He stressed that the program 
labor seeks and the program the pres- 
ent administration seeks "embrace 
very much the same objectives." 

Mr. Humphrey predicted that hos- 
pital and nursing home care for those 
covered by Social Security will be 
passed "before the flowers bloom this 
spring." He said that organized labor, 
by its activities and its goals, is mak- 
ing a contribution to American democ- 
racy and to the realization of "The 
Great Society." 

"And as long as you do that," the 
speaker declared, "you are going to 
have the friendship of, the encourage- 
ment of, and the support of the Presi- 
dent of the United States and, if it 
means anything to you, the man that 
will be alongside of him as Vice Presi- 
dent of the United States!" 

President Meany stressed in his 
speech that the nation wants and needs 
programs which will make it possible 
for every child to have a full and equal 
opportunity to learn and to shape his 



own future and for all workers to have 
full and equal opportunities to develop 
their skills and use them to the utmost. 
He stressed that labor's program is 
not a narrow and selfish program, but 
will benefit all the people. 

"There is not a single narrow, selfish 
proposal in the lot," he said, "and 
that includes the repeal of Section 14b 
of the Taft Hartley Act." 

Repeal of this section would in- 
validate all the state laws which have 
made union shop clauses or other 
maintenance-of-membership clauses in 
collective bargaining contracts illegal 
in 20 states, even though both parties 
to the contract might desire to include 
such a clause. 

Meany pointed out that a minimum 
wage of $1.25 is "poverty by legisla- 
tion" and stressed that it would take 
a wage of $1.50 per hour to attain 
an annual wage of $3,000, which 
amount has been pegged by the gov- 
ernment as "the borderline of poverty." 
Organized labor, he said, will cam- 
paign for establishment of a $2 per 
hour minimum wage and the exten- 
sion of coverage under the law to many 
now excluded from it. 

Many of the speakers told the dele- 
gates that it will not be possible for 
organized labor to "sit back and take 
it easy" and expect Congress to come 
up with the needed measures to carry 
out those programs which the nation 
needs. However, as Andrew Bie- 
miller, director of the AFL-CIO De- 
partment of Legislation pointed out, 
with a gain of 37 or 38 liberals in the 
House of Representatives, "we're lead- 
ing from strength" and he predicted 
that "if we do our job, this will go 
down in history as one of the greatest 
Congresses." 




Vice President-elect Hubert Humphrey spoke to those attending 
the conference and stressed that the help of organized labor 
is vital to success of the program the Administration seeks. 



FEBRUARY, 1965 





Sen. Eugene McCarthy of Minnesota 
■.poke on unemployment compensation. 



William Schnitzler, secretary-treasurer of the AFL-CIO, shakes 
hands with General President Hutcheson. C. J. Haggerty, presi- 
dent of Building and Construction Trades Department in center. 






Sen. Pat McNamara spoke to conclave 
on need for adequate public works. 



Medicare was the subject of talk 
given by Sen. Clinton P. Anderson. 



Legislative Conference 




Speaker of the House McCormack, at left with cigar, was guest 
of honor at a breakfast arranged by Massachusetts delegtion., 



C. J. Haggerty, Building and Con- 
struction Dept. President, as he 
appeared at legislative conclave. 





Andrew Biemiller, AFL-CIO Legis- 
lative Director, stressed urgent 
need for continued labor action. 




Washington ROUNDUP 



IN THE POLITICAL RING-One of the new faces on Capitol Hill will "be that of Repre- 
sentative John V. Tunney, 30, of Riverside, California. Tunney, a lawyer, is the 
son of heavyweight fighter Gene Tunney, who defeated Jack Derapsey for the heavy- 
weight title in 1927 with the famed 14-second "long count." History repeated 
itself when Tunney, Junior, had to wait for what has teen described as another 
"long count"; a period of 14 hours when the decision of the polls was in doubt. 

REDISTRICTING NOTES— More and more people are becoming increasingly vocal in 
demanding redistricting of states to give more parity to individual votes. In 
some cases cited in a recent Washington survey, a "handful" of people elect their 
state representative. One of the instances cited is the situation in a section of 
lew Hampshire where, under present voting boundaries, one township with only THREE 
voters elects a state assemblyman - the same representation accorded another 
district with 3,244 voters! 

PAY RAISES FOR A DISCHARGED WORKER?-When the government agency he worked for 
forced him to resign, Ernest Paroczay went to court, proved it was tantamount to 
an improper dismissal, and was granted about $20,000 in back pay. But Paroczay 
claimed an additional $3,000 which would have been his had he still been on the 
payroll because of in-grade increases and base pay increases voted by Congress 
when he was involuntarily off his job. The case is now pending before the U. S. 
Court of Claims in Washington, D. C. , the same court which had allowed his 
original claim for back pay. 






HALF TRILLION MARK— In case you don't know what a half trillion dollars means, 
we've just passed it. Personal income in the United States reached an annual rat 
of $502 billion "crossing the half -trillion mark for the first time," says the 
Department of Commerce. Personal income, the Department said further, has 
increased each month since February, 1963. 



" 



HEDGING— Some 17 plush businessmen weren't taking chances in the 1964 elections — 
they contributed to both sides, according to Press Associates. Henry Ford II is a 
good case in point. He gave $3,000 to the Republican National Committee before 
the GOP convention nominated Barry Goldwater, according to the files of the clerk 
of the House of Representatives. After San Francisco, Ford gave $18,000 to 
various Democratic groups. 



b 



CIRCULATED STORY— AFL-CIO President George Meany, during a recent White House 
visit, urged President Johnson to give legislative priority to repeal of Section 
14-b of the Taft-Hartley Act, which sanctions right-to-work laws. The President's 
response was reported by Columnist Les Finnegan to be, "George, you don't bring in 
the cross-eyed baby first in a beauty contest I Bring in something prettier 
first." 

REGISTERED APPRENTICES— In a sharp reversal of a 15-year downward trend, the number 
of registered apprentices in U. S. industry has increased for the third year in 
a row. 

The 1964 estimated number of registered apprentices is more than 165,000, 
an increase of 10,000 over the three-year period from 1961 when a 15-year low 
of 155,000 was recorded. 

The total number of apprentices in the United States, both registered and 
unregistered, was about 250,000 in 1964, the Department of Labor reported. 



FEBRUARY, 1965 




SMALL WONDER PROFESSIONAL USERS ASK FOR 
LUFKIIM MEZURALL TAPES 



When a man buys a tool that's to be his constant companion, he has a right 
to be choosy. After all, most carpenters spend more time looking at their 
measuring tapes than at their wives. S And because each has his own ideas 
regarding the kind of tape that suits him best — with respect to blade length, 
width and graduations — it's easy to understand the popularity of a line that 
offers the broadest selection in the industry. Lufkin tapes, for example, 
are available in lengths ranging all the way from 6 to 16 feet! S Add the 
pin-point accuracy that professionals demand . . . the unmatched legibility 
of White Clad . . . plus the extra long life of a Lufkote-protected blade, and 
the choosiest carpenters become the most confirmed Mezurall users of all. 
H Small wonder, indeed! 

THE LUFKIN RULE COMPANY / Saginaw, Michigan 



YOU'RE 
RIGHT 
WITH 



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'UFKIN 


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_ 





Cost Crisis in Elderly Insurance Erupts 
As Congress Takes Up Medicare 

By Sidney Margolius 
Consumer Expert for The Carpenter 




MEDICAL CARE for the elderly 
under social security was the only 
major consumer help President John- 
son proposed in his recent State of 
the Union Message. But the Presi- 
dent's request that Congress enact 
Medicare can help rescue older peo- 
ple from a spreading new cost crisis in 
private hospital and medical insurance. 

The "New York 65" plan sponsored 
by private companies as their answer 
to the need for less expensive health 
insurance for older people, has just 
raised rates 21 per cent. The "Con- 
necticut 65" plan is asking for its sec- 
ond rate hike. Increases also have 
been made recently by such widely 
used "over 65" plants as those sold 
by Continental Casualty Co., Fire- 
men's Fund and other private insur- 
ers, and by a number of regional Blue 
Cross and Blue Shield plans. 

The American Casualty Co., of 
Reading, Pa., cancelled completely its 
major medical policies covering 100,- 
000 families, including about 20,000 
people 65 or older. The Company 
said it could no longer continue these 
policies because of "sky-rocketing 
hospital, medical and physician 
charges." 

One state insurance department, 
New York's, got the company to offer 
comparable substitute policies to its 
policy-holders in that state. But for 
older people, the substitute policies, 
which were Continental Casualty 
Company's "Golden Age" plan, proved 
to be an expensive replacement. To 
continue their coverage, they now had 
to pay $150 a year instead of the 
former $60 to $90 charged by the 
American Casualty Co., for its dis- 
continued policy. 

Moreover, the substitution was ar- 
ranged only for New York State resi- 
dents, that state's Joint Legislative 
Committee on Health Insurance Plans 
pointed out. It left still uncovered 
90,000 policyholders and their depend- 
ents in other states. 

The latest crisis has occurred be- 
cause private company plants, even 
the "State 65" plans which cuts agents' 
commissions and enroll only during 
specified "open" periods, have shown 
themselves unable to provide adequate 



insurance for the elderly at a mod- 
erate cost. 

A relatively complete private plan 
like the Metropolitan Life Insurance 
Company's "Senior Hospital and Pro- 
fessional Policy" costs $212 per per- 
son, or $424 a year for a couple, and 
still does not cover all medical ex- 
penses. It allows $25 a day for hos- 
pital room and board, which would 
not cover the full cost today in many 
cities (typical semi-private charge now 
is $25-$35 a day not including 
"extras"). For hospital extras, and 
non-surgical doctors service in a hos- 
pital, you would pay the first $50 and 
the policy would pay 80 per cent of 
the balance. Besides other limitations, 
this policy has a waiting period of 
six months for existing ailments, and 
the company also has the right to 
insert riders further eliminating cov- 
erage for existing conditions. 

Yet this plan, with its limitations, 
was one of the most complete of 56 
policies recently evaluated by the New 
York Joint Legislative Committee. 
We give the Metropolitan policy nine 
points of a numerical scale, compared 
to 4 to 6 points for many other private 
company plans evaluated in the sur- 
vey. 

Another relatively complete plan 
program, the Continental Casualty 
Company's full "Golden 65" package 
consisting of three separate policies 
(any of which also can be taken out 
separately), also would take a major 
part of a typical retired couple's in- 
come. This full program costs almost 
$300 a year per person — close to $600 
for a couple. 

The "State 65" plans cost less than 
such comprehensive individual plans 
but also are a little less complete. For 
example, the "New York 65" plans 
rate 6 to 8 points on our informal 
scoreboard. The Blue Cross plans for 
senior citizens included in the survey, 
still usually are least costly of the 
private and voluntary plans, and typi- 
cally rate 6 to 7 points for their more 
comprehensive contracts. 

Some private company hospital in- 
surance plans rate as few as 3 points. 

Thus the relatively complete private 
plans are financially out of reach of 



MARGOLIUS 



most retired people, and the inexpen- 
sive ones provide such small benefits 
(some only $10 a day towards hos- 
pital care) that they are notoriously 
inadequate. Many older people have 
been buying such pseudo-cheap poli- 
cies without understanding the limita- 
tions. 

"The average person feels that he 
has more benefits than the policy ac- 
tually provides," Walter Rountree, a 
Florida state official, recently warned. 
For one reason, older people do not 
always realize that the application they 
fill out, with its questions about exist- 
ing conditions and previous illnesses, 
becomes a part of the insurance con- 
tract. Too, ads and other representa- 
tion often fail to make clear the exact 
provisions and limitations. 

For that reason, Florida, which has 
a high proportion of retired people 
living on moderate incomes, has estab- 
lished 20 field offices throughout the 
state to help seniors understand and 
evaluate health policies before they 
buy them. 

The proposed Medicare plan still 
will not pay all your health expenses 
(or those of your parents if you help 
support them). Medicare is primarily 
hospital insurance. But it will insure 
us as we reach retirement age against 
the most disastrous of all medical ex- 
penses. The Social Security Advisory 
Council points out that while medical 
care costs for all aged couples aver- 
aged about $442 in 1962, the medical 
expenses of aged couples with one or 
both members hospitalized averaged 
$1220. These costs would be even 
higher today. 

The Medicare bill would provide 
hospital care and extras for 45 days 
paid in full, or 90 days subject to a 
deductible of up to $90. Medicare 
also would provide outpatient diag- 
nostic services, home nursing care, 
and up to 60 days of nursing home 
care. 

By taking care of this most serious 
potential expense. Medicare would 
make it feasible for older people to 
buy additional private or voluntary 
plans supplementing the proposed So- 
cial Security coverage. 

Copyright 1065 by Sidney Margolius 



FEBRUARY, 1965 



11 





EDITORIALS 



* TURN SIGNALS AND CRACK-UPS 

Despite the dread toll of death caused by disease, 
most of which is not preventable even with the finest 
medical attention, one of the greatest causes of death 
are automobile accidents. The difference is that 
every automobile accident is preventable. 

Every crash can be traced back to someone doing 
something which he or she should not have done. 
He drove too fast, made a turn where he shouldn't 
have, crossed a center line, drove while he had been 
drinking, failed to pay attention to his duty as a 
driver or in some other manner "broke the rule." 

It is a sad statistic that we kill, on U. S. streets 
and highways, about 50.000 men, women and children 
every year. The average driver has a significant acci- 
dent (not simply a fender-creasing in a parking lot) 
every 40,000 miles. This is one every four years or 
less at the normal driving rate of 1,000 miles a month. 

A survey of professional drivers . . . truckers who 
cruise the highways daily . . . revealed that of all the 
faults which they feel contribute to accidents, the sim- 
ple failure to signal other drivers in advance is the 
most-violated and causes the most crashes. Other 
serious violations of driving ethics causing accidents 
include following too close, failing to dim lights at 
night, making sudden changes of directions and driving 
excessively slow on high-speed highways and freeways. 
Other faults listed included excessive speed, ignoring 
traffic lights, stop signs and "do not pass" signs, 
crossing the center line and "drifting" between lanes. 

If you want to stay alive, remember to keep "an 
air space" around your auto with plenty of room 
ahead of you, don't let someone "tailgate" behind 
you, and make certain you have room to your left 
and right if you must move to avoid someone else. 
Speed up, slow down and move left and right slowly 
and deliberately and signal beforehand! 



* SOCRATES THE ARCHITECT 

Not all architects are great thinkers, nor are all 
great thinkers architects. But the noted Greek phi- 
losopher Socrates, who lived about 2500 years ago, 
lent his intelligence to the Greeks who were plan- 
ning their houses. 

According to the historian Xenophon, who re- 
corded much of Socrates' wisdom, the philosopher 



asked his listeners: "Should a house be a pleasant 
place to live in and a safe place to store one's be- 
longings?" His listeners agreed that such was the 
case. "Well, then," Socrates continued, "should a 
house be cool in the summer and warm in the winter?" 
And again his listeners assented to these self-evident 
facts. 

"Well, then," the philosopher declared, "if you 
build the north side low and the porticos high and 
facing the south, the building will be protected from 
the cold in the winter and, in the summer when the 
sun is high, it will cast shade and it will be cool, but 
in the winter when the sun is low, warm. If, then, 
these are desirable characteristics, this is the way to 
build a house." 

Despite the passage of many centuries, improve- 
ments in materials and changes in construction tech- 
nology, the admonition of Socrates is still a sound 
one for the planner of what the philosopher termed 
"a pleasant place to live." 

* HOME WORK ON SCHOOL WORK 

We learned long ago in school that, if we weren't 
keeping our grades high , and weren't learning our 
lessons, we might have to do home work to keep 
up with the other kids. 

A former schoolteacher named Lyndon Johnson 
reminded us — in a special message to Congress last 
month — that the nation is falling behind in its school 
work, and some extra effort must be put into our 
state and Federal educational programs just to main- 
tain what we have now. 

"The growing number of young people reaching 
school age demands that we move swiftly to stand 
still," is what the President said. 

Grade school and high school attendance will jump 
by 4 million in the next five years. Our colleges must 
be prepared to add 50% more enrollment to their 
already-overcrowded facilities. 

Under such conditions, Congress must appropriate 
funds for schools. It must reach a settlement on the 
controversy over Federal aid to education and get 
on with the job ahead. Local school boards must 
move ahead with their plans, and we, the people, 
must write our Congressmen to get the legislation up 
for a vote. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



A LTHOUGH it may seem other- 
wise, man's life span has not really 
lengthened much over the centuries. 

More people are living longer, 
it's true. But this is because they 
have been able to fight off cancer, 
heart diseases, and other health 
menaces, avoid accidents, eat bet- 
ter foods, and live more serene lives. 
More people are now able to actu- 
ally live out their normal life span, 
thanks to man's increased knowl- 
edge and affluence. 

Once a man reaches 50, however, 
his life expectancy is actually little 
greater today than it was 150 years 
ago. He will reach his 70s and con- 
sider himself fortunate. 

Scientists, now, are taking an- 
other look at this life span and are 
hoping to increase it by discovering 
more about the aging processes in 
animals. They know that aging is 
an accumulation of bodily changes 
that increase one's chance of dying, 
but they do not understand the na- 
ture of these changes — why, for ex- 




Man's Life Span 



... has not really lengthened 

much, but scientists hope to increase 

it by discovering more about 

the aging processes of animals 



ample, a canary which is about the 
same size as a mouse and has a 
much higher metabolic rate, should 
live six or seven times longer. 

A mouse is ancient at four, while 
the hare — the tortoise's traditional 
rival — lasts only a few years longer. 



The King of Beasts 
has an outside chance 
of reaching 30 . . . 



, . . while man can count 
his birthdays for four 
decades longer. 




This is a strikingly poor showing in 
comparison with the durable tor- 
toise. 

Even a 120-year-old man is a 
mere whippersnapper compared to 
some tortoises, the National Geo- 
graphic Society points out. Claims 
of tortoises living 300 years and 
more cannot be authenticated, but 
one famous Marion's Tortoise lived 
on the Indian Ocean island of 
Mauritius from 1766 to 1918, when 
it was accidentally killed at the age 
of 152. 

"Jonathan," a famed tortoise on 
the Atlantic island of St. Helena, 
was reputedly 40 years old when 
Napoleon was exiled there in 1815. 
Still alive at the latest report, the 
tortoise thus is reckoned to be at 
least 189 years old. 

Size apparently has little to do 
with tortoise longevity, and the little 
American box turtle may live to be 
about 120. 

In the lower animal orders, single- 
celled creatures such as amoebae 
live indefinitely because they repro- 
duce by splitting in two. Among 
backboned animals, man seems to 
outlive everything but tortoises. 
Claims of two long-lived rivals — the 
elephant and parrot — have generally 
been disallowed. 

One elephant lived to be 57, but 
the average life expectancy of the 
species seems to be about 45. There 
is no authenticated record of a par- 
rot living to be more than 54. 

A sampling of zoo records reveals 

that the vaunted tiger is not even an 

(Continued on Page 14) 



FEBRUARY, 1965 



13 




A canary can 
outlive a cat, 
if old age doesn't 
get the best 
of him. 



MAN'S LIFE SPAN 
Continued from Page 13 

also-ran in the longevity stakes. The 
record for a tiger is believed held by 
"Dacca," who died at New York's 
Bronx Zoo this year at the age of 20. 

A lion once lived to be 29; a hip- 
popotamus, to 49. Several bears 
have survived into their thirties. 
Among fish, carp reportedly swim 
in ponds until 60 or 75. A durable 
tapeworm allegedly lived inside a 
man for 35 years. 

The oldest resident of the Na- 
tional Zoological Park in Washing- 
ton is a white Siberian crane, ac- 
quired on June 22, 1906. Since the 
crane was already at least two years 
old when acquired, the Zoo's assis- 
ant director J. Lear Grimmer says 
it must be over 60. 

A dog of 17 is the equivalent of 
a human centenarian. Smaller dogs, 
like fox terriers, cocker spaniels, 
dachshunds, and Pekingese, win out 
over larger dogs. A cat lived to be 
21. 

Among insects, mayflies last but 
a single day in the adult stage. 
Houseflies are more durable. A 
careful study of 8,500 flies kept in 
captivity on a diet of powdered 
milk, sugar, and water showed males 
living an average 16.88 days and 
females 28.74. Longer life for fe- 
males is common among species 
ranging from ants to human beings. 

As a sidelight on this matter of 
man's longevity, it is interesting to 
note that humans are also getting 
taller and heavier than their fore- 
bears. American men now average 
5 feet 10 inches — 2 inches more 



WHO LIVES LONGER? 
The American Worker or The Russian Worker? 

Although expectation of a long life in the United States is slightly 
higher than that reported in the Soviet Union (for both males and fe- 
males), with advancing age, the expectation of life reported in the Soviet 
Union tends to be higher than in the United States, if we are to believe 
Soviet figures for the number of its citizens age 60 and over. 

This fact is brought to light by a recent analysis of mortality statistics 
in the Soviet Union made by Robert J. Myers, chief actuary of the 
Federal Social Security Administration in Baltimore. 

Soviet data were based on life tables compiled from the 1959 Soviet 
Census. United States mortality figures correspond to the same period. 

Mr. Myers stated that for males, mortality in the United States is 
lower than that in the Soviet Union up to age 50 — by as much as 50 per- 
cent at the youngest childhood ages and by 25 to 40 percent at the 
young adult ages. After 50, male mortality in the United States is shown 
to exceed that reported in the Soviet Union by differentials increasing to 
as much as 15-20 percent at ages 65 and over. However,. the Soviet 
mortality rates at the older ages — especially after age 60 — seem un- 
reasonably low, he said. 

Comparison of female mortality between the Soviet Union and the 
United States presents the same general picture as for males, according 
to the Myer's paper. At ages under 25, female death rates in the United 
States is about half (or less) that of the Soviet Union, while at the young- 
er adult ages the differential is about 25-40 percent. Following age 45, 
female mortality in the United States is shown to be higher than that of 
the Soviet Union, with the differential being about 15 percent at most 
ages. 

In explanation of the relatively low mortality reported in the Soviet 
Union at ages 45 and over, Mr. Myers said that it could represent the 
experience of a select group with regard to mortality who survived the 
great hardships of World War II. He doubted that this could be the 
entire explanation, stating that a large part of the difference appears to 
be misreporting of age — both in the death registration and in the census. 

According to Mr. Myers' paper, the age distribution of the Soviet 
population is somewhat younger than that of the United States, the 
medium ages of the total population being 26.6 and 29.5 respectively. 

He concluded that mortality in the Soviet Union has improved greatly 
in the past half century, although adequate data for comparison with 
earlier periods are available only for the European portions of the coun- 
try. 

"The decline in mortality rates has probably been greater for the Soviet 
Union than for many other economically developed countries because 
of the very high level that prevailed there in the past," noted Mr. Myers. 



than in 1900. Women are taller, too, 
averaging 5 feet, 5 inches. 

Weights also have gone up, to an 
average of 165 pounds for men and 
127 pounds for women. 

Many hotels and dormitories are 
ordering seven-foot beds to accom- 
modate the growing — and lengthen- 
ing — population. Carpenter fathers 
find themselves looking up to their 
teen-age sons. 




In the race with time, tht 
stand a chance against 
tortoise. 



hare doesn't 
the durable 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



© 



( ) (JD ( ) ^ < ) CTD ( ) 



LEVELING ON THE ISSUES 



"Extremism" is a word 
which received considerable 
attention during the recent 
political campaign. 

It will receive much more 
attention before the Republi- 
can Party rebuilds some sem- 
blance of unity after its No- 
vember 3rd cave-in. 

What is "extremism"? Is 
there extremism in the United 
States, and if there is, how 
do you recognize it? 

Webster defines extremism 
as "the quality or state of 
being extreme; radicalism." 
This is not a very precise 
definition. However, it will 
' do until a better one comes 
along. 

Extremism always existed 
in every society, and the 
United States is no exception. 
Extremism wrote some black 
chapters in American history. 
Extremism was at the root 
of the witch-burnings in New 
England and the vigilante 
movement in the early west. 
Following World War I several 
dozen IWW organizers were lynched 
on the West Coast by extremists. 

On the other hand, there has been 
extremism that men revere to this 
day. The Alamo is one example; 
Bastogne is another. In these cases 
men chose to die rather than yield. 

From this, one can only conclude 
that extremism is neither all good 
nor all bad. It has a place in the 
affairs of men, but the dangers in- 
herent in it are vast. Those who 
were burned at the stake in Puritan 
New England for witchcraft were 
victims of extremism. Who knows 
how many men, whose only crime 
was to want a better break for work- 
ers, died on gallows in the IWW 
lynchings. 

The trouble with political extrem- 




EXTREMISM 

neither all good nor all bad 



ists is that they have no faith in 
democracy. To their way of think- 
ing, the people just don't understand 
the seriousness of things as clearly 
as they do. Therefore, they some- 
times feel obligated to take things 
in their own hands. 

Through various mental processes, 
much too devious to even begin to 
trace, a certain number of people 
divorce themselves from "The Herd" 
and become mavericks. Oftentimes, 
their decision to go it alone, or with 
a minority, is made on the basis of 
one speech heard or one book read. 
Sometimes it is made on the basis of 
selfish economic wishfulness; "I 
think that if I don't lend my efforts 
to The Cause, this government will 
take away everything I have worked 
so hard to obtain!" Or it may be 
that the thought goes thusly: "I 



think I had better join The 
movement because if I don't, 
the economic royalists are 
going to take over control of 
the country and I won't be 
able to buy beans for my 
family!" 

In North America, rule is 
by the opinion of the major- 
ity. If the vast majority of 
the people of the United 
States thought that Joe Dum- 
bick ought to be elected as 
lifetime dictator, then that 
event would, doubtless, come 
to pass. Anyone who thought 
otherwise might well be la- 
belled "an extremist" and, if 
he became too troublesome, 
might be put away in a cell 
or even more drastically dealt 
with. 

Thomas Jefferson under- 
lined his faith in what he con- 
sidered the democratic proc- 
ess when he said that the best 
test of a proposal is to deter- 
mine if the majority of voters 
are in favor of it. This is, of 
course, democracy in its true sense. 
Jefferson also said: "If there be 
any among us who would wish to 
dissolve this Union or to change its 
republican form, let them stand un- 
disturbed as monuments to the safe- 
ty with which error of opinion may 
be tolerated where reason is left free 
to combat it." 

In his acceptance speech. Senator 
Goldwater said, "Extremism in the 
pursuit of liberty is no vice." Is 
such a statement valid? Translated 
into every-day terms, the Senator's 
statement can be paraphrased as 
"the end justifies the means." In 
rare instances, the end does justify 
the means. In college philosophy 
courses, professors are constantly 
posing questions such as this: Do 
the occupants of a life-boat have 
Continued on Page 17 



FEBRUARY, 1965 



15 



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Timber Engineering Company (TECO) 
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the firm's national network of over 150 
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of measuring and squaring before making 
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vides greater accuracy in the layout of 
building parts and pieces. 

The TECO "Mark 16" consists of a 
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wood, steel or concrete. 

Additional descriptive information on 
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A New Featherweight 18" Pry-Bar has 
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JUPITER CHAIN SAW 




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This rugged, completely portable gas 
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It can be operated by one hand, has no 
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and 9'A pound weight makes it ideal for 
easy and handy storage. The safety con- 
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pressure is released and there is no shock 
hazard. This Chain Saw has 10" usable 
blade that travels 900 feet per minute 
and can be used for cutting firewood, 
pruning, rough construction work, scaf- 
folding and similar uses. For informa- 
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Beach, California. 



NEW NAIL-ON 'STONE' PANELS 

A brand-new simulated stone fiberglass 
building panel and edge trim that's simply 
hand-nailed into place has been intro- 
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Tagged Roxite, the big 12 x 48-inch 
units are actually embedded with crushed 



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Edgestone Trim, narrow strips of the 
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The Roxite panels weigh less than one 
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ideal for installation over open studs, 
masonry, plaster, gypsum wallboard and 
other "sheathing" materials. Roxite and 
Edgestone is available in three natural 
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as surfacing — interior or exterior — for 
walls and wall sections, room dividers, 




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won't sag or deform and they are crack- 
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vibration. They also resist acids, alkalis, 
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NEW MULTI-PURPOSE UTILITY TOOL 




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Inc., 105 Duane Street, New York 8, N.Y. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



High on a Windy California Hill 




LOS ANGELES, CALIF.— With price tags of $35,000 to $50,000, stilt 
houses are sprouting on hillside plots in the Los Angeles area, as land with a 
view of the city grows more scarce. Architects call them "indecent exposures," 
because of the plumbing and heating lines hanging below. The city says they 
are safe, but they have not been tested by an earthquake. (AP Photo) 



Leveling on the Issues 

Continued from Page 15 

the right to throw overboard one or 
two undesirable occupants, if this 
means a better chance of rescue for 
the rest? In other words, do good 
ends justify undesirable means? 

Generally speaking, most people 
believe not. 

In the tense and critical situation 
existing today, there are the extrem- 
isms of the far-right and of the far- 
left. Although they are poles apart, 
they have one thing in common: 
Neither of them has much faith in 
the common sense of the people. 

The hallmark of the extremist is 
a conviction that the nation is about 
to disappear if his ideas are not 
adopted. Extremists constantly see 
a subversive plot in everything. Take 
a matter as simple as foreign aid. 
To the extremist of the far-right, 
foreign aid is a Communist plot to 
bankrupt the nation, and thus pave 
the way for a Red take-over. To 
the extremist of the far-left, foreign 
aid is a plot of big business to dom- 
inate the world by forcing Yankee 



Imperialism on other nations. 

The truth is that foreign aid is an 
imperfect, often bungling, sometimes 
wasteful, vehicle for helping other 
nations resist the tyranny of Com- 
munism. It is neither a plot to bank- 
rupt the nation, nor a Trojan horse 
to create Yankee Imperialism. 

This mistrust of what the people 
are doing runs through the thinking 
of extremists at both poles. Without 
this feeling that the collapse of the 
nation is imminent, they would not 
be extremists. 

The vast majority of people who 
stand in the main stream of Amer- 
ican thought appreciate that the 
threat of Communism is both dire 
and close at hand. They appreciate 
also that there are ills in the demo- 
cratic structure which needs to be 
eradicated. They believe that those 
whom they elected to guide the des- 
tinies of the nation are dedicated to 
standing firm against Communist en- 
croachment and that they are equally 
determined to wipe out the evils 
which short-change those citizens 
who are on the bottom rung of the 
economic ladder. 



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17 



- - 



ML 




Pockets of Poverty Mar Canadian Picture, Too 



AN ANALYSIS of Canada's prog- 
ress over a period of 30 years 
makes interesting reading. 

The years 1934-5 were just about 
at the height of the terrible depres- 
sion. At that time Canada had a 
population of under 1 1 million people, 
and the per capita income was just 
about $300. 

Today, Canada's population is well 
over the 19 million mark, and the 
average income per person is over 
$1700 ... in 1965 dollars. It is true 
that inflation has taken some off the 
value of this income rise, but, even 
so, the real wealth of the nation has 
gone up substantially. 

Taking the price index in 1935 as 
100, the price index now is around 227. 
That is, prices have more than 
doubled. But income per capita has 
gone up almost sixfold. 

Three decades ago the gross na- 
tional product (GNP or the total 
product of goods and services), 
amounted to $4,315 million. This 
year it is going to be close to $50,000 
million, a 12-fold increase in GNP 
with a population less than doubled. 

Retail sales now are nine times as 
big as they were then, car registra- 
tions are up five-fold. 

All in all this is a story of rising 
development, marred though it is far 
too often by tragic spells of reces- 
sions. 

But one major group in the Ca- 
nadian community appears to have 
gained far less than others. This 
group is the farm community. 

Only recently has the situation 
among farmers become generally 
known. Not because it didn't exist 
and hasn't in many ways been de- 
teriorating, but simply because it was 



hidden from view by the generally 
progressive advances in most other 
parts of the economy. 

The true conditions have now been 
brought to light with the fresh con- 
cern being directed to the problem of 
poverty. Figures on poverty in Can- 
ada show that farmers, more than any 
other major group are likely to be 
among the lowest income levels. 

There are about 436.000 farms in 
Canada and of these, 177.000 or 
about 40% have a gross income (that 
is, income before expenses, taxes &c.) 
of under $2500 a year. 

Eight areas in Canada are the poor- 
est, in Saskatchewan between Saska- 
toon and North Battleford; in eleven 
eastern counties of Ontario; in Quebec, 
the Rouge River valley, and the 
Brome-Stanstead areas of the Eastern 
townships; the Nova Scotia north 
shore; and much of Newfoundland. 
These are only the worst of them. 
Ten other parts of the country are 
almost as bad. 

Why don't these farmers move out? 
But where to? If they move into the 
cities, they compete with city work- 
ers for jobs, and in times of unem- 
ployment, force down living stand- 
ards. If they remain on the farms 
without change, they create what 
amount to rural slums with families 
under-nourished, under-housed and 
under-educated. Their purchasing 
power is low. They are a drain on 
the economy, taking out far more in 
welfare than they contribute in taxes. 
In this respect, of course, they are 
no worse than the lowest-income 
groups in the city. They've just been 
getting less attention. 

It is to help these farmers that the 
Agricultural Rehabilitation Develop- 



ment Act, a federal-provincial pro- 
gram, has been put into effect. 

ARDA in effect tries to help these 
farm people to help themselves in a 
positive way. This includes farm 
credit, improved training in farm man- 
agement, and training for those who 
leave the farms to re-establish them- 
selves elsewhere. 

Someone has said that it's no solu- 
tion to the problem to cause the rural 
poor to become the urban poor. The 
rural problem is not one that is sepa- 
rate from the problems affecting the 
rest of the community. Help to needy 
citizens in agriculture is just as im- 
portant as help to those in our cities, 
or else what is now called a farm 
problem could more and more be- 
come a city problem. 

Unskilled Workers 
Keep Jobless Level Up 

Unemployment levels are down to 
the lowest in seven or eight years, 
averaging just over four percent across 
Canada. The prairie provinces and 
Ontario have the best employment 
records with jobless figures around 
the two percent mark. This is re- 
markable considering the serious un- 
employment of only two winters ago. 

In general, skilled workers have 
no trouble finding jobs, although 
fairly recent figures show about six 
percent unemployed in construction. 
This compares with under four per- 
cent in transportation and service in- 
dustries and under three percent in 
primary industries (agriculture, fish- 
ing, logging, mining). 

In fact there has been some com- 
plaint about the lack of skilled work- 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



ers. "Good jobs are going begging," 
said the Financial Post at the end of 
1964, "but the unemployed can't fill 
them because most of today's job 
seekers haven't the education or 
training required." 

Key reason for the skilled shortage, 
says the Post, is Canada's booming 
economy. "In construction, for ex- 
ample, many big skill-eating projects 
are underway and more are planned 
. . . multi-million dollar pulp mills 
and two hydro-electric dams in B.C.; 
three fertilizer plants in Alberta; four 
potash mines and a hydro-electric dam 
in Saskatchewan; river diversion in 
Manitoba; factory and office building 
in Ontario and Quebec; a heavy water 
plant and pulp and paper expansion 
in the Maritimes." 

The question being asked in labor 
circles is, why weren't the unemployed 
trained in past years to be available 
for the skilled jobs now? 

THE COVER 

Continued from Page 1 

97-year history as a nation. Actually, 
however, the residents of that coun- 
try will be able to fly two flags. The 
House of Commons voted to make 
the United Kingdom's Union Jack, 
Canada's second flag, a symbol of 
Canada's ties to the British crown and 
the commonwealth. It is interesting 
to note that the Union Jack has flown 
atop Canadian flagpoles for more than 
100 years without official national 
status. 

If a Canadiian citizen wishes to fly 
two flags, he must erect two flagpoles 
so that the two banners will be dis- 
played side by side. 

Although there was quite a bit of 
dissention over the adoption of a new 
flag for Canada, the final approval of 
the new maple leaf insignia had its 
humorous side. All sides of the House 
of Commons cheered as the vote 
ended. Then the Conservatives led a 
rendition of "Rule Britannia"; Credit- 
istes responded with "Alouette"; and 
the Liberals came through by sere- 
nading Prime Minister Lester 6. 
Pearson with "For He's A Jolly Good 
Fellow". No one, however, sang 
Canada's national anthem — "O, 
Canada". 

In a very recent press release from 
the Office of the Prime Minister, it 
was announced that on December 
24th, 1964, the Queen approved the 
recommendation of Parliament for the 
design of the new Canadian flag. 

Also on our February cover is the 
beautiful and traditional clock tower 
of the Parliament Building at Ottawa 
— a Canadiain landmark. It was in the 
Parliament Building, only a few weeks 
ago, that Canada's legislators cast the 
votes approving the new standard. 

FEBRUARY, 1965 




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19 






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Your Socio/ Security 



Questions and Answers About 
Your Retirement Benefits 



Q. If a husband and wife have both 
been working for several years, have 
had social security taken out, will 
they each draw on their own social 
security when they retire? 

A. A wife may receive social security 
benefits on her own work record or 
she may receive a benefit equal to 
one-half the amount her husband re- 
ceives. She will receive the larger of 
the two benefits. 

Q. My husband was 62 on his last birth- 
day. He has worked in the shipyards 
for 20 years. He now wants to take 
his social security at 62 instead of 
waiting until he is 65. How soon can 
he apply? 

A. He can file now. He can receive a 
benefit for the first month his earn- 
ings do not exceed $100.00 He may 
receive payments also back to and 
including January 1964 if he has not 
exceeded $1,200.00 in wages. 

Q. If a single person dies and both par- 
ents are dead, can a sister, brother, 
nephew or niece draw this person's 
social security? 

A. The social security lump sum death 
benefit will be paid to whoever pays 
the funeral bill. 

Q. I will be 62 on Nov. 13, 1964. I have 
worked 13 years under social security. 
Can you tell me how much I can get? 
My husband, age 73, is dependent on 
me. How much can he get from my 
social security? 

A. Social security benefits may be paid 
to you and your husband if he is 
more than 50 per cent dependent on 
you. The amount of the benefit is 
determined by your monthly average 
wage. For an estimate, contact your 
local social security office. 

Q. I was born in Lancaster, S. C, in 
1902. My birthday was February 15 
and I am now age 62. At the time I 
was born there were no birth certifi- 
cates issued in Lancaster. How can 
I receive a wife's benefit without my 
birth certificate? 

A. A birth certificate is not absolutely 
necessary to prove age. Other docu- 
ments may be used. These may in- 
clude a baptismal certificate, census 
record, school record, age given on 
marriage license, voting record, insur- 
ance policy, just to name a few. Con- 
tact your local social security office 
for further information. 

Q. I worked 12 years and paid social 
security. My husband died January 
1963. I was told I could not draw 



social security until age 62. I am 
now 60 years of age. When I become 
62, can I draw any of my husband's 
social security? 

A. When you reach age 62, you may 
draw either on your own record or 
82'/i per cent of your husband's 
amount, monthly. You will be paid 
the larger of the two benefits. We 
presume you have already received 
the lump sum death payment. 

Q. I was born in December 1904 and 
have worked under social security 
since 1937. I plan to retire in Feb- 
ruary. Do I have enough quarters 
and what percentage would I receive? 

A. You have enough quarters. The 
amount is determined by your wages. 
Contact your local social security 
office for an estimate. 

Q. I am now 59 years old and have 
worked under social security ever 
since it started. I plan to retire at 
age 62. I am unemployed at the pres- 
ent time and having trouble finding 
work. How much more time would 
I have to put in to be eligible for 
social security or do I already have 
enough quarters? 

A. Anyone who has 10 years or 40 
quarters of coverage is insured for 
life for all benefits. 

Q. I was in social security from its 
beginning until January 7, 1942. Then 
I went into government work and 
Civil Service. I am 58 years old, plan 
to retire at age 62. Will I receive 
any social security benefits as well 
as my Civil Service retirement? 

A. It appears that you may have 21 
quarters of coverage. This will keep 
you fully insured until 1972. Since 
you are a male workers, if you reach 
age 65 in 1971, you will need 20 
quarters, if you reach age 65 in 1972, 
you will need 21 quarters of cover- 
age. 

Q. My wife and I are both on social 
security. We are both past 73 years 
of age. We had to take over a busi- 
ness and are operating it. Do we 
have to pay social security tax on our 
net earnings as self-employed per- 
sons? 

A. Yes, you will have to pay the self- 
employment tax as long as you have 
annual profits of $400.00 or more. 
This work however, will not effect 
the receipt of your benefits as you are 
both over 72. 

21 





mm 



ortaDato 



7000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 




FIRST PRIZE FLOAT— Carpenters Local Union 792, Rockford, III., won first prize at the 
last Labor Day Parade in its home city, with the above entry built by members of 
the local. 








. 


"i *. ♦ 



MASTER CRAFTSMAN— with wood as his favorite media, are the best words to describe 
C. A. Curtis, an 83-year-old member of Local 112 of Butte, Montana. 

Above, are samples of his work — the Great Seal of the United States, at left, and 
a hand-carving of an old-time fire engine and crew, with a portion of the United 
Brotherhood seal (at lower center), right. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of 
the Knights of Pythias, Brothers Curtis fashioned a plaque, by hand, with three 
letters denoting "Friendship, Charity and Benevolence," the lodge's motto. It is cen- 
tered on a replica of the Holy Bible. 

Although Brother Curtis has spent his whole life working with his hands, he is glad 
he is now retired, so that he can have more time to pursue his number-one hobby — 
working with wood. 

We congratulate you, Brother Curtis, for the fine work you do. 




Mr. and Mrs. Johnson 

MOST-DECORATED — Hezekiah Johnson, 
of 304 Park Street, Stratford, Conn., 
is the most decorated blood donor of the 
American Red Cross. Mr. Johnson per- 
haps has visited the American Red Cross 
banks about 150 times in all. Some of his 
earlier records were lost, but Brother 
Johnson has given his 105th pint of blood 
accounted for up to November 19, 1964. 
when he reached the Red Cross age 
limit. 

Brother Johnson started giving blood 
before World War II, when he gave for 
the armed forces, as well as for the Kor- 
ean War. Many newspaper stories have 
been written about Brother Johnson. He 
has also been on radio on behalf of the 
American Red Cross Blood Donor Pro- 
gram, and has been cited on many occa- 
sions. 

Before Brother Johnson reached the 
age of 60, he became a great-grandfather. 
They had nine children in all, with 22 
grand children. He and his wife hope 
to celebrate their 40th wedding anniver- 
sary May 12, 1965. 

Mrs. Johnson was born Lillian Dem- 
mon, February 25, 1908, in Stratford, 
Conn. Brother Johnson works for the 
Gellately Construction Company in 
Bridgeport, Conn. He is a former mem- 
ber of Local 115, Bridgeport, Conn., the 
same local his father belonged to in 1913 
when he met a tragic death on a con- 
struction job. 

Mr. Johnson has belonged to Local 
1580, Milford, Conn., for a number of 
years. He also belongs to the First Meth- 
odist Church and St. John's No. 8 A.F. 
and A.M.. as well as Obeh Grotto, Bridge- 
port, Conn. Brother Johnson is a former 
amateur and professional boxer, and be- 
longs to the old timers athletic associa- 
tion of greater Bridgeport. He has many 
hobbies, among them writing stories, one 
of which is in Hollywood, as a movie 
script, as well as a series of television 
movies. He also writes poetry, and has 
composed many songs and hymns. He is 
an inventor, with patents in both the 
United States and Canada. 

Mr. Johnson was born November 19, 
1904, in the oldest city in North America, 
St. John's, Newfoundland. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



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HI 




HAPPY GROUND HOG DAY 




Java See Her? 

There's a burlesque queen who calls 
herself Coffee Bean. If seems she 
likes the same old grind. 

UNION DUES— TOMORROWS SECURITY 

A Jump Ahead 

Jim, having moved from the city 
to a small town, encountered an old 
"city" friend one day. 

"I hear the people down there are 
rather 'back- woodsy,' " stated the 
friend. 

"Yes — ," answered Jim. "But the 
crowd I run with are more intelligent 
than most." 

"How's that?" 

"Well, we take our baths on Friday 
night. If we wait till Saturday night, 
when everybody else is taking a bath, 
the water pressure is awfully low." 

— Mrs. O. L. Campbell, 
Julian, Calif. 

YOU ARE THE "U" IN UNION 

Vice-Versa Vice 

In biblical days, those who stepped 
across the bounds of propriety were 
stoned. Today it's often the other 
way around. 

PATRONIZE UNION-MADE GOODS 

Madly Rushing Russian 

A Soviet official named Ivanov was 
sent on an inspection tour of all the 
satellites. 

The first telegram he sent back to 
his superiors read: 

"GREETINGS FROM WARSAW. 
LONG LIVE FREE POLAND!" The 
second read: 

"GREETINGS FROM PRAGUE. 
LONG LIVE FREE CZECHOSLO- 
VAKIA!" 

After a long delay, a third tele- 
gram arrived: "GREETINGS FROM 
PARIS. LONG LIVE FREE IVANOV!" 



Nutsy Drunk? 

The drunk was having trouble in 
the pay telephone booth. "Whad- 
daya mean 'Number, please?' " he 
shouted. "You got my dime . . . 
now gimme my peanuts!" 

BUY ONLY UNION TOOLS 

E-Motion Pictures 

The operator of the local drive-in 
movie reported he showed the worst 
picture of the decade last week, but 
his customers loved every minute of it. 



&£> 





The Bare Facts 

How can women be provoked 
At gentlemen who stare? 
They choose to be provocative, 
Else why are they that bare? 
— E. Francis, 
Haverton, Pa. 

HIIIIHIHlHHUHHim 

This Month's Limerick 

There was a young man from Trevizes 
Whose ears were of different sizes. 
The left one was small 
And of no use at all; 
With the right one he won several 
prizes. 

— Mike Earney, 
Sullivan, Mo. 

(WE NEED LIMERICKS) 



Real Luna-tic Driver 

We hear that, in the next rocket 
■shot at the moon, they are contem- 
plating sending a woman — on the 
theory that a woman driver can hit 
anything. 

— E. P., 

Seattle, Wash. 

PATRONIZE UNION-MADE GOODS 

Perfect Squelch! 

A car screeched to a halt at an 
intersection and barely missed an old 
lady. Instead of bawling him out, she 
just smiled sweetly and pointed to a 
pair of baby shoes dangling from the 
rear-view mirror. 

"Young man," she asked, "why 
don't you put your shoes back on?" 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 




Mean Of Woman! 

The foreman told the psychiatrist: 
"Doc, we gotta do something for my 
wife. She's completely immature!" 

"That's too bad," replied the head- 
shrinker. "How does this condition 
manifest itself?" 

"Sometimes she gets violent, doc. 
Just last night I was taking a bath 
and she stormed in and sank every 
damn one of my boats!" 

YOU ARE THE "U" IN UNION 

Hot Under the Collar 

Going to his lawyer to collect the 
fire insurance settlement on his store, 
the merchant was surprised to see how 
much the attorney was keeping in 
fees. 

"The case has been in litigation a 
long time," the attorney explained. 
"I've earned it." 

"For Pete's sake," muttered • the 
client, "you'd think you started the 
fire." 

ALWAYS BOOST YOUR UNION 

Mr. Pert Sez: 

"Most folks nowadays are firm be- 
lievers in th' two-party system. They 
favor one on Friday night and another 
on Saturday night." 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



'Trade Unionism for Apprentices' Is Successful Experiment 




Those attending the Local 314 graduation dinner were, seated, left to right: Michael McConnell, Burton Sipple, Nathan Duerst, 
Carlton Quamme, Robert Kelley, James Rathbun, Gerald Riddle, Leo Thorsen, and Ruins Phillips. Standing, left to right: 
Bill Nilles, David Norsetter, Vernon Friedland, Roland Lamberty, Russell Brickwell, Robert Beghin, Harold Freitag, Ron 
Stadler, John Faust, Robert Strenger, Carl Eckloff, Michael Marking, Norris Tibbetts, Marvin Brickson, Gould Morrison, Ar- 
len Spaanem, Raymond Banbury, Richard Swenson, William Dyhr, Jr., and Raphael Grob, Jr. 



MADISON, WIS.— On Tuesday, Dec. 
1, 24 apprentices, all members of Local 
314, received certificates indicating suc- 
cessful completion of a course in "Trade 
Unionism for Apprentices." The class 
was jointly sponsored by Local 314, the 
Madison Vocational and Adult School, 
and the University of Wisconsin School 
for Workers, with the Madison Federa- 
tion of Labor and the Wisconsin State 
Council of Carpenters keeping close 
watch on the proceedings. 

Classes were held for two hours one 
night a week for eight weeks at the Wis- 
consin Center Building in Madison. Top- 
ics covered included labor history, labor 
law, structure of the labor movement, 
the theory and practice of collective bar- 
gaining, and the responsibilities of the 
member to his union. Each session was 
a combination of lecture and discussion, 
with liberal use of labor firms related to 
the topic of the day. The instructor was 
Norris Tibbetts of the School for Work- 
ers staff. 

These sessions in labor education for 
apprentices frankly represented an ex- 
periment on the part of the union in at- 
tempting to fill an apparent gap in the 
training of young men in the trade. Ron 
Stadler, president of the Wisconsin State 
Council of Carpenters; Carl Eckloff, busi- 
ness agent for Local 314; and John Faust, 
Local 314 president, conceived the idea 
for the class many months ago and 
worked closely with the Vocational 
School and the UW School for Workers 
in the development of the program. Mar- 
vin Brickson, president of the Madison 
Federation of Labor, kept in touch with 
the program in the interests of determin- 
ing its possible application to other trades 
in the community. The apparent success 
of the class gives encouragement to the 



State Council's thoughts of extending this 
type of instruction to other locals in the 
state. 

The graduates and guests enjoyed a 
graduation banquet at Rhode's Steak 
House, with Carl Eckloff acting as master 
of ceremonies. Praise and encouragement 
were heaped upon the graduates by Rob- 
ert Strenger, General Representative for 
the International office Ron Stadler, John 
Faust, Rufus Phillips of the State Ap- 
prenticeship Board, and Gould Morrison 
of the Vocational School. Mr. Morrison 
awarded the certificates of accomplish- 
ment. Bill Dyhr spoke for the appren- 
tices. 

The results of a written class evalua- 
tion completed anonymously by the ap- 



prentices indicated enthusiasm for the 
program and an almost unanimous agree- 
ment that it should be made a regular 
part of the apprenticeship program. 

All of the apprentices who registered 
for the class completed the attendance 
requirements and received certificates. 
They were: Burt Sipple, Nathan Duerst, 
Harold Freitag, Russell Brickwell, Robert 
Beghin, Roland Lamberty, Robert Kelley, 
Ray Grob, Michael Marking, Phillip 
Vinje, James Rathbun, Arlen Spaanem, 
David Norsetter. William Zamzow, Rich- 
ard Swenson, William Dyhr, Leo Thor- 
sen, Michael McConnell, Gerald Riddle, 
Eugene Ring, William Banbury, Carlton 
Quamme, William Nilles, and Vernon 
Friedland. 



Festive Visit to a Honolulu Tea House 




HONOLULU, HAWAII — General President M. A. Hutcheson and Mrs. Hutcheson 
(seated at left above) and General Treasurer Peter Terzick and Mrs. Terzivk (seated 
at right rear) were guests of the officers of Local 745, Honolulu, last November, while 
the two General Officers were attending a Building Trades Board Meeting in the 50th 
State. The setting was a Japanese tea house, complete with kimonos and sandals. 



FEBRUARY, 1965 



25 



The Old Timers of Salem, Oregon 




SALEM, OREG.— In the January is- 
sue of The Carpenter, we ran a story 
about the old-timers honored by Local 
1065, Salem, Oregon. At that time, we 
did not have photographs of the honored 
guests. The pictures have arrived, and 
we present them above and at right. 

A. J. Ketterman, left, and Eugene Crail, 
center, both 50-year-plus members of 
Local 1065, Salem, Oregon receive pins. 
Brother Lyle Hiller, Seventh District 
board member, makes the presentation. 



Nevada Apprentices and Proud Wives 





Attending the 1964 Las Vegas Awards Banquet following last year's Arizona contest 
were, left to right: Robert Arneson, statewide carpentry winner, and Mrs. Arneson; 
Mrs. Jack Ceveri and Jack, statewide cabinet winner; Mrs. Ben Jones and Mr. Jones, 
Carpenter's Joint Apprenticeship Coordinator. All are from Reno. 



Special Representative 
Glenn C. Titus Dies 

In December, Glenn C. Titus of Local 
1505, Salisbury, North Carolina, died of 
a heart attack. He was a special repre- 
sentative for the International. 

Members of Local 1 505 who attended 
the funeral service were: L. H. Earn- 
hardt, president; .1. A. Cartner, vice presi- 
dent; H. E. Wilson, financial secretary 
and M. W. File, recording secretary. 

Brother Titus was held in high esteem 
by his local and the International. 

He was born and reared in Green 
County, Pa., the son of Thurman L. Titus 
and Adda Johnson Titus. He was educat- 
ed in the Green County schools. He 
played professional baseball in the 
Coastal Plain and Carolina League. Fol- 
lowing his mrriage he moved to Durham 
and had lived here since. 

He was a veteran of World War II, 
serving in the European Theater. 

For a number of years Jie had been a 
member of the Glendale Heights Meth- 
odist Church, the American Legion, Post 
No. 37, Huntsville, Ala., and the Car- 
penters Union Local 1505 in Salisbury. 

On Sept. 14, 1947. he was married to 
Miss Maude Lee Carr of Durham who 
survives with one son, Kenneth Carr 
Titus; one daughter. Miss Glenda Lee 
Titus, both of the home. 

Also surviving are his father, Thurman 
L. Titus and his stepmother, Mrs. Thur- 
man L. Titus, both of Carmichael, Pa.; 
two sisters, Mrs. Frank Conway of 
Greensboro, Pa., and Mrs. Robert Stone 
of Manlius, N. Y.; five brothers, Marion 
and Robert V. Titus, both of Pasadena, 
Md., Sesler Titus of Cleveland, Ohio, 
Claude R. Titus of Glenn Burnie, Md., 
and Thurman K. Titus of Carmichael, 
Pa. 

California Auxiliary 
Has Active Sewing Club 

YUBA CITY, CALIF.— Ladies Aux- 
iliary 748 of Marysville and Yuba City, 
Calif., has received an award for its con- 
tribution to the Penny Pines Project, a 
local charity. It has an active sewing 
club called "Stitch & Chat". President 
Hazel Emerson said that they always try 
to put a little money aside for the scholar- 
ship fund. 

60- Year Veteran 
Member of Local 929 

HUNTINGTON, CALIF.— Carl Mal- 
colm Johnson of Local 929, Los Angeles, 
will reach his 60th year of continuous 
membership in July, 1965. He joined 
the Carpenter's Union in New Britain, 
Conn., in July, 1905 

Carl was a building contractor for 
more than 40 years but still kept up his 
membership in the Carpenters, trans- 
ferring to California in 1923. 

Brother Johnson is still very active 
and has made three trips to his home- 
land, Sweden, in the past ten years. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 




December 
Contributions, 
Kennedy-Roosevelt 
Fund 



For several months organized labor has been conducting an inten- 
sified drive to collect funds for memorials to the late President John 
Kennedy and the former First Lady and beloved world leader, 
Eleanor Roosevelt — both of whom were true friends of the laboring 
population. 

The tally of contributions from United Brotherhood local unions 
in the Kennedy-Roosevelt Fund Drive has reached $126,026.31, an 
increase of more than $2,000 over the previous report. 



L.U. 888, Salem, Mass. .$ 
L.U. 929, Los Angeles 

Calif 

L.U. 900, Altoona, Pa. . . 
L.U. 2264, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
L.U. 1167, Smithtown, 

N. Y 

L.U. 177, Springfield, 

Mass 

L.U. 2189, Madera, Calif. 
L.U. 1590, Washington, 

D. C 

L.U. 10, Chicago, 111. .. 
L.U. 642, Richmond, 

Calif 

L.U. 1319, Albuquerque, 

N. Mex 

L.U. 819, West Palm 

Beach, Fla 

L.U. 180, Vallejo, Calif. 
L.U. 105, Cleveland, Ohio 



11.50 L.U. 801, Woonsocket, 

R. I $ 5.00 

L.U. 13, Chicago, 111. ... 43.75 

L.U. 67, Boston. Mass. . 500.00 
L.U. 246, New York, 

N. Y 155.00 

L.U. 51, Boston, Mass. . 279.00 

L.U. 1289, Seattle. Wash. 22.25 

L.U. 19, Detroit, Mich. . 100.00 

L.U. 176, Newport, R. I. 10.00 

L.U. 810. Wakefield. R. I. 10.00 
L.U. 2573, Coos Bay, 

Oreg 25.00 

L.U. 1135, Port Jefferson, 

N. Y 7.20 

L.U. 146, Schenectady, 

N. Y 50.00 



500.00 

3.30 

20.00 

125.00 

191.00 
2.00 

100.00 
24.38 

60.00 

20.40 

7.00 
22.62 
25.00 



Total for December . . 
Previous Contributions 



. $2,319.40 
.$123,706.91 



Grand Total $126,026.31 



Local 109, Sheffield, Presents Pins 




SHEFFIELD, ALA. — Twenty-five-year pins were recently presented to members 
of Local 109. Seated from the left are: Aaron Smith, E. T. Jaynes, Clyde E. Jeffers, 
W. D. Perkins and J. O. Laxson. Standing, from the left are: Henry W. Chandler, 
4th District Board member; H. T. Miles, business representative of Local 109; W. R. 
Green; John M. Thorntor, financial secretary of Local 109; R. B. Willis; A. D. Lyles, 
Sr. and Harry Killian. Those not present were J. R. Allen, H. C. Penny, E. L. 
Rickard, Carl White and R. A. Tesseneer. J. C. Baker, although eligible for a 60- 
year plaque, did not attend the presentation. 



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Apprentices Learn First Aid in Fort Wayne 




FORT WAYNE, IND. — Local 232 of Fort Wayne, recently included a course on 
first aid in its apprenticeship training class. It is the first building union to offer such 
instruction in the Fort Wayne area. There are 13 apprentices in the class. 

Shown from left are apprentices: Oscar Lopez, Lynn Righter, Steve Sipe, and Larry 
Zink (serving as patient on floor). Harry Vondran, right, is the Red Cross instructor 
teaching artificial respiration. 

1964 Judges and Winners in New Mexico 

[H 




At the Second Annual New Mexico State Carpenters' Apprenticeship contest, officials 
pose with winners. Back row, left to right: John F. Otero, state labor commissioner 
and director of apprenticeship; Glenn A. Werham, trustee; Luther Sizemore, secre- 
tary .hoard of trustees; Rodell R. Bloomfield. trsutee; Alva J. Coats, chairman of the 
board of trustees, and Jack Sampson, state supervisor of the Bureau of Apprentice- 
ship and Training. In the front row, left to right are: first place winner O. B. Coffee, 
representing L.U. 671; second place winner John B. Bruce; Carpenter's Training 
Fund Director Vernon J. Beckwith; Richard Peterson, third place, and Terry L. 
Bushee, fourth place winner. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Hagerstown Local 
Marks 50th Year 

HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND— Lo- 
cal 340 of Hagerstown recently cele- 
brated its 50th anniversary with a dinner- 
dance and a presentation of 25 and 50- 
year pins. 

Among those in attendance were Mr. 
John L. Seabright, President of the Vir- 
ginia State Council; and business repre- 
sentative of the Washington District 
Council; F. P. Allender, president of the 
Maryland State Council and business 
representative of Local 1024 in Cumber- 
land; and Special Representative Herbert 
C. Skinner, who was the main speaker of 
the evening. D. T. West, public relations 
manager for the Jamison Cold Storage 
Door Company of Hagerstown, was also 
present. It is interesting to note that his 
company has worked under a union con- 
tract with Local 340 for 47 continuous 
years and carries Label No. 1 for the 
State of Maryland. 

Those members of 340, who were eli- 
gible for a 25-year pin though not present 
were: Charles Bowers, Roy B. Brown, 
Charles J. Butts, Bruce W. Byers, John 
W. Clark, Samuel W. Gray, John W. 
Johnson, Roy S. Mundey, Joseph A. Null, 
Earl R. Paden, Clyde E. Shull, Charles 
W. Smith and Jesse H. Warrenfeltz. Eli- 
gible for a 50-year pin and not present 
was Thomas E. Jones. 




mm iPENTERS LOt 



m 

fly 



THOSE GUESTS sitting at Local 340's head table were, from the left: John L. 
Seabright; Ralph M. Thomas, Recording Secretary of the Maryland State Council 
and President of Local 101 in Baltimore; F. P. Allender; Herbert C. Skinner; R. A. 
Michael, Financial Secretary of the Maryland State Council and Business Representa- 
tive of Local 340; Max E. Showe, President of Local 340; and D. T. West. 




FROM LEFT TO RIGHT are members with 25-years service or more: Wilbur 
Wiles, Leonard Heflin, Samuel Miller, Snively Glesner, Albert Schlotterbeck, William 
Hebb and John M. Roe. A fifty year pin was awarded to Hames A. Waters at ex- 
treme right. Standing in rear are R. A. Michael, Business Representative and Presi- 
dent Max E. Showe. 



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CONTRA COSTA, CALIF.— A special-called meeting was held by Local 1453, 
Costa Mesa, Calif., recently, to present to those apprentices who have graduated in 
the past four years, 1961-1964, from the Apprenticeship Program their journeyman's 
certificate from the Brotherhood. 

Pictured from left to right are: 

Top Row: Theodore Miller, Herman E. Jones, Raymond Thibault, Robt. F. Worms, 
James A. Harris. 

Front Row — Cyril Fritz, Financial Secretary-Treasurer of Carpenters' Local 1453, 
John Dellea, Kenneth Goodwin, James H. Fisher, Robert Cochran, Apprenticeship 
Co-Ordintor for Orange County, J. D. A. Mitchell, Apprenticeship Representative for 
Local 1453, Frank Pacheco, Douglas Tarpp and Jess Green, President of Carpenters' 
Local 1453. 

Below is a list of those apprentices who are eligible for the journeyman's certificate 
but who were not present at the special-called meeting: 

John J. Collinson, David G. Hartke, Jay D. Lightsey, James C. Perkins, John J. 
Robertson, David R. Stewart, Nathan H. Varney, Charles R. Gammon, Geral L. 
Happeny, Michael J. Neuben, Richard L. Ramsey, Lawrence Schott, Lowell R. 
Slater, Robert C. Suder, Larry G. Warlaumont, Bobby Lee Williams, Dale Adams, 
Andrew L. Gyursick, H. Gary Kelso, Fernie Miranda, Jr., James Bento, Luciano 
Chavarria, Earl R. Clark, Thomas W. Jergeson (deceased), Jerry Mann, Robert 
Vancil, Louis E. Anderson, Richard D. Arey, Wilbur Cloutier, Perry Mastro, Phillip 
Mellot, Benjamin Regules, Joseph W. Seeley, Wesley Warvi and Alex Poch. 




Presentation of 25 and 50-year pins was made recently by Local 1453. Also shown 
are officers and representatives of the Brotherhood. 

From left to right: 

Top Row — Charles Riggs, Charles J. Peters, James G. King, Executive Secretary 
of the Orange County District Council of Carpenters, Cyril Fritz, Financial Secretary- 
Treasurer of Carpenters Local 1453. 

Middle Row — David Goldberg, William A. Wilson, Charles Trenta, Business Agent 
for the Orange County District Council of Carpenters and President of Orange County 
Building Trades, J. W. Pressley, Chester LePage, Glen Niel. 

Front Row — George Untied, Jr., C. L. Everman, Milton Blodgert, R. O. Parish, 
Dave Gray (50-year pin), Harland J. Wood, Harry Blowers and Harry Harkelroad, 
Representative from California State Council of Carpenters. 

Below is a list of brothers, eligible for their 25-year pins, however, not present at 
the presentation: 

Ted Austin, Harry E. Bowers, Arthur Carter, C. Cowenberg, Martin Crane, Roy R. 
Howland, Martin F. Java, Jack H. Johnson, Joseph Lowrey, H. L. Nichels, Elton L. 
Richmond, Joseph J. Tarantino and Richard L. Winslow. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



Central Arizona Carpenters' JAC Awards Banquet 




Those awarded certificates at Phoenix included: front row (from left) — Joe Stephenson, Jim Hampton, Ralph Mellecker, Paul 
Jenkins, Jackie Cleeton; second row — Ken Dennison, Carl Sherrill, Robert Horton, Rudy Guzman, Dan Nelson, Gary Leonard, 
Gordon Rudnick, Lynn Martin, Tom Symns; third row — Gary Harmon, Augustin Hernandez, Richard Moreno, Dennis 
McCulley, Gene Grant, Virgil Swoyer, Jim Abernathy, Lester White, Richard Walpole, Fred Homes; back row — Al Grant, 
Marvin Jamie. Paul Linger, Peter Aguilera, Ronald Wolfe, Rudy Archuleta, Charles Beasley, Tom Friedman, Wayne Shawler, 
Jerry Owens. Completing apprentices not pictured: Noble Black, Ed De Lucenay, Lenny De Rose, Walter Dunn, Charles 
Mills, John Neal, Bill Phillips, Don Powell, Ken Price, Jerry Stuart, John Turcotte. 



PHOENIX. ARIZ.— The Central Ari- 
zona Carpenters' Joint Apprenticeship 
Committee held its annual Completion 
and Awards Ceremony Banquet No- 
vember 20, 1964. in Phoenix. 

Forty-five young men, who had com- 
pleted four years of apprenticeship, were 
honored. 

Dan Finch, chairman of the commit- 




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tee, was host for the evening. A set 
of Audels was presented to the com- 
pleting apprentices by Leo Gable, general 
representative, and a member of the 
National Joint Apprenticeship Commit- 
tee for the Carpentry Trade, who pre- 
sented the Journeyman Certificate from 
the Brotherhood. 

Steve Medigovich. director, Arizona 
Apprenticeship Council, presented a cer- 
tificate from the State of Arizona. 

M. R. Eppert, director. Phoenix Union 
Adult Evening School, presented a cer- 
tificate for completion of four years re- 
lated technical training. 

E. J. Wasielewski, chairman, Arizona 
Carpenters' Apprenticeship Committee, 
and a member of the National Joint 
Apprenticeship Committee for the Car- 
pentry Trade, was a participant. 

Kenneth M. Dennison was presented 
the Cliff Maddox Award as Outstanding 
Apprentice in the state, and Marvin D. 
Janne was presented a special certifi- 
cate as Central Area Outstanding Ap- 
prentice for 1964. 

A set of Irwin bits were awarded as 
Perfect Attendance Awards to Walter 
Dunn, Gordon E. Rudnick, and Virgil 
E. Swoyer. Bouquets were presented 
to the wives of these young men. 

John Douthit. Assistant Administrator, 
Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training, 
U. S. Department of Labor, in charge 
of Office of Standards and Technical 
Services, attended the banquet since he 
helped make this apprentice program 
the most outstanding program in the 



state and is very much interested in it. 
He gave a short address. 

Ben Collins, general representative, 
and William J. Smith, assistant regional 
director, Arizona - California - Nevada 
AFL-CIO, were among the many man- 
agement and labor persons present. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Audel Publishers 27 

Belsaw Machinery Co. ... 30, 38 

Chicago Technical College ... 19 

Construction Cost 28 

Eliason Stair Guage Co 32 

Estwing Manufacturing Co. . . 33 

Foley Manufacturing .... 29, 35 

Hydrolevel 39 

Kant Slam Door Check Co. . . 32 

Lee, H.D., Co., Inc 17 

Locksmithing Institute 17 

Lufkin Rule Co 10 

Miller Sewer Rod Co 39 

Milwaukee Electric Tool Co. . 24 

Siegele, H. H 30 

Skil Corp 20 

Stanley Work, The . . Back Cover 

Timber Engineering Co., Inc. . 27 



FEBRUARY, 1965 



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Construction Goes 
To College at 
Florida University 

DAYTONA BEACH. FLA The 

problems and successes of a unique De- 
partment of Building Construction at the 
University of Florida were outlined to 
the Florida Association of Carpenters' 
Business Agents at a recent meeting in 
Daytona Beach. 

King Royer of the department "dedi- 
cated to education students in the most 
effective and efficient building construc- 
tion practices," declared that the need in 
construction today is for men who not 
only understand architecture and estimat- 
ing, but can understand the overall pic- 
ture of how all trades are supervised and 
how a construction business is run. 

Mr. Royer said that the department is 
"providing a training program for you, 
your members, and their sons and daugh- 
ters. The choice we try to give you is 
not between one of our graduates and an 
experienced superintendent, but between 
apprentice training and college training 
for the same person." 

He pointed out that enrollees take, in 
addition to directly-related construction 
courses, general courses such as English, 
politics, history, math, etc., in order to 
provide them a well-rounded education. 
He pointed out that finding qualified con- 
struction men as instructors who also 
possess the required college degree is 
sometimes difficult. 

Included in the curriculum are three 
courses in estimating, heating and air 
conditioning systems design, plumbing 
and electrical layout according to various 
codes, business methods, contracts, busi- 
ness law, accounting, structural engi- 
neering and structural design with empha- 
sis on the use of wood. Accent is also 
made on safety with stress being laid 
on safe construction of formwork, tem- 
porary buildings, scaffolding and rigging. 

The speaker declared that, there is a 
steady demand for the graduates of this 



unusual school and that they start at 
considerably higher wages than are other- 
wise available. He said that the school 
does not have enough graduates from the 
building construction department to meet 
the demand. 

"Our most successful graduates are 
those who were journeymen or appren- 
tices before they started to college," de- 
clared Mr. Royer. He said the present 
president of the student body works at 
his trade to pay his expenses. 

In conclusion, the speaker said: "We 
hope to avoid the decision many young 
men must make: Do I go to college or 
into the construction business? We hope 
they will choose to go to college and 
into the construction business." 

Local 642 Holds 
Pin Presentation 



■ 


lag M ! , ( 


. gfcjT~] mi«_JS. 


f'.l 


V ' ' i 


1 


'J 


I ' 



RICHMOND, CALIF.— Local 642 of 
Richmond, recently held a 25-year pin 
presentation. Pins were awarded by the 
Officers of the Bay Counties District 
Council. 

In the first row, left to right, are: Vir- 
gil Johnson, Guy Harrison, Bill Bendler, 
Albin Harmon, John Caulfield and C. R. 
Bartalini, secretary-treasurer of the Bay 
Counties District Council. 

In the back row, from left, are: Holland 
Sprague, Joe Bailo, Chester Horn, Jim 
Mockler and Al Figone, president of the 
Bay Counties District Council. 



Local 792 Presents Membership Pins 




ROCKFORD, ILL.— President Henry Brown of Carpenters Local Union 792, pre- 
sented 25- and 50-year pins to members at a recent meeting. Participating in the 
ceremony, from left, were George Goldsworthy, 25 years service; Glen Hagaman, 25 
years; Arnold Marten, 25 years; Martin Thodman, 25 years; Carl Nelson, 25 years; 
Melvin Johnson, 25 years; Clarence Bergvall, 25 years; Oscar Johnson, 50 years; and 
President Brown. Fred Aebischer, 50 years, was unable to attend. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



Stockton, California, Local Awards 25-Year Pins 




STOCKTON, CALIF. — Local 266 of Stockton recently gave their long-time faithful members who had served the union 25 
years or more their service pins. The 61, out of 114 eligible, who were able to attend, included: J. A. Autry, Joe Barry, L. 
Barsi, R. E. Bell, C. U. Benge, Peter Bigler, R. M. Campbell, Owen Carlson, Floyd Carmichael, Frank Castiglione, A. O. 
Chain, Martin Christensen, M. H. Dailey, F. N. Drake, Earl Eckert, A. H. Fedler, Jr., Chas. Garner, C. M. Gauger, A. J. 
Gauthier, George Gauthier, D. Ghilarducci, Henry Goehring, Otto Graves, Roy Hamilton, Herbert Heim, James Hilton, 
Clifford Isbell, M. P. Jiles, Wm. Klein, D. A. Knowles, Elmer Leonard, W. H. Lubkeman, R. J. Magnuson, Jack Malone, 
Oliver McAdams, Merle McDow, Frank McEneny, O. L. Merritt, Gordon Miner, B. F. Montgomery, John O. Morris, T. C. 
Osborn, Emmett Powers, Hugh Pugh, Kenneth Beams, Marty Regalia, Sylva Repetti, Willis Robbins, R. O. Robinson, Leo 
Saccone, Frank Salvetti, G. N. Smith, J. A. Sousa, R. O. Toothacre, Kenneth Tyler, John Urbani, Alex Wautier, W. V. Welch, 
Wm. E. Wheeler, Paul Witt, Don Gatschet. The Gauthiers are brothers — A. J. initiated in Dec. 1935, and George initiated 
in June 1934. Photo by Dodge. 




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FEBRUARY, 1965 



33 




By FRED GOETZ 

Readers max write to Brother Goetz at 8658 S.E. Ellis Street, Portland, Ore. 



Cougar, Big Game Hunter 

Now that the big game hunting season 
has tapered off in most states, many 
hunters are leveling their sights on 
predators. 

One of the cagiest and hardest to 
track is the cougar, otherwise known as 
the puma, panther or mountain lion. 

While the nimrod is hunting the big 
cat, chances are that vicious critter is 
also stalking through the wild woods for 
it is, traditionally, a mighty hunter of 
big game itself — elk, deer, wild sheep, 
goats and boar. (In the west, where 
plenty of deer are available, that ani- 
mal provides as much as 80 percent of 
the cougr's diet.) When none of the 
bigger game is to be had, it will settle 
for birds, rabbits, other small game. 

Also on the cougar's bill of fare is 
livestock. They have been known to 
attack a good-sized bull and come off 
without a scratch. There is an authentic 
record of a large cougar that either 
killed or maimed a total of 19 sheep 
in one night of slaughter. 

It is not uncommon for the cougar 
to stalk the hunter who is stalking him 
as many have found evidence of them 
doggin" their own tracks. Such "reverse 
tracking" has been credited to curiosity 
for the cougar has a healthy respect 
and fear of man. 

Contrary to general belief, the cougar 
rarely, if ever, leaps on its prey from 
a tree. (Sorry, Hollywood.) All evidence 



indicates that it either lies in wait along 
the trail or stalks its prey. In the case 
of a large animal, it will leap upon its 
shoulder, bite into the neck or throat. 
After the kill it will gorge itself, then 
cover the carcass with dead leaves or 
other forest debris for later use. It will, 
however, turn away from the meat after 
it has become putrid. (Illustration: Har- 
old C. Smith, staff artist, Oregon Game 
Commission.) 

Africa's Game in Peril 

All is not honey and cream these days 
with the African big game situation. 
In Africa, as in America, there is a fierce 
competition for grazing land — public or 
otherwise — and when a given sector of 
land cannot support both domestic stock 
and wildlife — wildlife has to go. 

Another threat to African wildlife is 
the money-hungry poacher. With high- 
powered rifles, poisoned arrows, traps 
and snares, they kill for skins and ivory; 
collect elephant feet for umbrella stands 
and waste baskets; make fly whisks from 
giraffe tails. Rhinos are hunted for their 
horns because powdered rhino horn is 
believed to be a powerful sex stimulant 
for the jaded. Meat of the eland and 
zebra bring high prices in mining camps. 

More than two dozen African mam- 
mals are facing extinction. Magnificent 
creatures such as the cheetah, the leopard, 
several kinds of zebras, the mountain 
gorilla and the aardvark are threatened. 



Among African deer and antelope in 
danger are the sable, Angora antelopes, 
the bontebok and the blassbok, the 
greater kudu and the giant eland, the 
white-tail gnu. the Barbary stag, the Wali 
ibex and the oryx. The tiny chevrotain, 
a deer the size of a rabbit, is in the same 
leaky boat. Something must be done — 
and quickly — if Africa is to preserve its 
wealth of wild treasures. 

It is to the African's and the world's 
benefit that the game is conserved and 
one can only hope that a solution is 
worked out before the cup is empty. 

Harriman's Trophy Buck 

While on the subject of deer, specifical- 
ly bucks we're reminded of a letter and 
photo from Mrs. Harriman of Woodland, 
Maine whose husband Alonzo, a mem- 
ber of Local 2400, downed a trophy-sized 
buck that sported a rack like grandma's 
rocking chair. She sent in graphic proof 
of it, this six-pointer that dressed out at 
204 pounds. Standing by with joy and 
approval is Mr. and Mrs. Harriman's 
son and nephew. 





Harriman's son, buck, and nephew. 

Unlucky 4-Leaf Clover 

We hear tell that one of the officers of 
the Pennsylvania Game Commission 
came home to find a wood chuck eating 
in his clover field. He rushed into the 
house; fetched his rifle and promptly 
finished off the critter. When he ex- 
amined the carcass he found it had a 
four leaf clover in its mouth! 

Right Sheep, Wrong Ram 

Every now and then some specie of 
big game, a male, shows romantic in- 
clinations toward domestic livestock. 
Such a rare and productive union was 
recently consummated on a sheep ranch 
in northwestern South Dakota. A big- 
horn ram wandered out of the high 
country south of Buffalo and was seen 
dallying among a sizable flock of do- 
mestic sheep. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



In the spring the results were mani- 
fest — 1 1 lambs, with straight short hair 
instead of wool, ranging in color from 
whites to browns to nearly black, and 
with a far-away look in their eyes. 

Last we heard half of the strange 
little hybrids had died but South Dakota 
biologists are watching the survivors with 
keen interest. 

Favorite Pastime 




George Wilson in his tree. He sits at the 
"tip top" of the left fork of the tree. See 
him? 

It is always a pleasure to hear from 
the oldtimers, one in particular being 



George Wilson of Columbia City, Ind., 
a member of Local 232, Fort Wayne, 
75 years young. Brother Wilson writes: 
"Dear Fred: 

"I get a kick out of reading about 
what the old 'bucks' are doing with their 
spare time, ha! 

"I'm not a hunter or a fisherman, Fred, 
but I'm a lover of nature and like to 
dig in the deep soil; raise things for 
kicks, then give the fruits of my pleasure 
and labors away. 

"One of my pastimes is to climb the 
old prune tree in my back yard as you 
will observe by the enclosed photo. That's 
m$ 'way up there on the pinnacle of the 
left trunk'." 




Members of the Carpenters' Union — 
in good standing — and the members of 
their families can earn a pair of the il- 
lustrated SPOONER lures by sending in 
a photo of a fishing or hunting scene — 
and a few words as to what the photo is 
all about. 
Send it to: 

Fred Goetz, Dept. OMSP 

0216 S. W. Iowa 

Portland, Oregon 



Please mention the Local number. Of 
course, all members of the family and 
retired members are eligible. 

Rabbit Stalker 




Brother Howlett Stalking Rabbits 

Another veteran outdoorsman is James 
Howlett of Bronx, New York, a member 
of Local 1456, retired. Here's a pic 
of Brother Howlett, easing through the 
brush in the Catskill Mountains of New 
York. The object of his attention is 
the nation's most popular small game 
animal — rabbits! 



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FEBRUARY, 1965 



35 




IN MEMO 




I .1 . NO. 15. 

HACKENSACH, N. J. 

Klein. Emil 
Wiley, \lfred 

I .1 . NO. 42, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

CALIF. 

Argiro, Elario 
Desepte, W. G. 

Stone. Jack 
Warchot, Louis P. 
While. George 

L.U. NO. 50. 
KNOXVILLE. TENN. 

Carey. C. D. 
Smelser, George 

L.U. NO. 54, 
BERWYN, ILL. 
(CHICAGO) 

Dorotkewicz. Henry 
Safanda. Joseph 

L.U. NO. 55. 
DENVER 5, COLO. 

Johnson. Eric 
Shively. Richard O. 

L.U. NO. 61, 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Brockway. Frank 
Brown. Dorris D. 
Messisk, H. E. 

L.U. NO. 65, 
PERTH AMBOY, 
N.J. 

Beck. George 
Jansek. Steve 
Lelewski, Ladislau 

L.U. NO. 72, 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Barr, Robert 
Stothard. Frank 

L.U. NO. 80, 
CHICAGO 39, ILL. 

Strinberger, John H. 

L.U. NO. 89, 
MOBILE, ALA. 

Steele, J. E. 

L.U. NO. 100, 
MUSKEGON, MICH. 

Barnhardt, Peter 
Bickle, Donald 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Howard, William M. 

L.U. NO. 129, 

W. HAZLETON, PA. 

Opfer, William F. 



L.U. NO. 135. 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Fisher. Philip 
Haidenbilt, Sidney 
Kagan, Herman 
Mininni. Sabino 

L.U. NO. 146, 
SCHENECTADY, 

N. Y. 

Johnson, Joel 
Mader, Edward 
Olsen, Herman 

L.U. NO. 155, 
PLAINFIELD, N. J. 

Van Fleet. Clarence 

L.U. NO. 191, 
YORK, PA. 

Miller. Lawrence 

L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEX. 

Dooley. H. R. 

L.U. NO. 200, 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Burns. Chas. E. 
Huggins, Clifford 

L.U. NO. 201, 
WICHITA, KANS. 

Moorhouse, John 
Reikowsky, E. A. 

L.U. NO. 211, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Black. William V. 
Deemer, Calvin C. 
Hollenberger, Sr., 

Samuel S. 
Irvin, Frank 
Kunz, Leonard C. 

L.U. NO. 218, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Elo, Waino 
Landry, Camille P. 
Lyman, John 
Moores, George 
Parker, Archibald S. 
Pretty, John A. 
Tucker, William 

L.U. NO. 226, 
PORTLAND, OREG. 

Brunkow, Walter 
Easley, Robert L. 
Enns, Henry P. 
Newton. William A. 
Rahn, Gust 
Reed, Alfred 

L.U. NO. 235, 
RIVERSIDE, CALIF. 

Brooks, Jay L. 
Clawson, Olin Frances 
Freeman, Raymond J. 



Haight. Ira C. 
Hicks, Gibson I. 
Parker, Roy Hubert 
Stockton, Alvin James 

L.U. NO. 242. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Schroder, David C. 

L.U. NO. 257. 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Alfronsi, Pasquale 
Clark, Maurice S. 
Noonan, Dennis 

L.U. NO. 281, 
BINGHAMTON, 

N. Y. 

Cain, Raymond 

Ludwig, Walter J. 

L.U. NO. 283, 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Bruggeman, W. F. 
Sprouse. David Y. 

L.U. NO. 301. 
NEWBURGH, N. Y. 

Krisch, John 

L.U. NO. 322, 
NIAGARA FALLS, 

N. Y. 

Little, Robert 

L.U. NO. 361, 
DULUTH, MINN. 

Anderson, Jacob, P. 
Berg, Heyerdal 
Johnson, Frank, A. 

L.U. NO. 368, 
ALLENTOWN, PA. 

Heilman, John 
Meyers, George 

L.U. NO. 430, 
WILKINSBURG, PA. 

Eynon, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 436, 
NEW ALBANY, 
IND. 

Wall, Pete 

L.U. No. 545, 

KANE, PA. 
Stophel, Harry E. 

L.U. NO. 584, 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Nelson, Sr., John B. 

L.U. NO. 594, 
DOVER, N. J. 

Berry, Clarence 

L.U. NO. 595, 
LYNN, MASS. 
Paquettte, Ferdinand 



L.U. NO. 599, 
GRIFFIN, IND. 

Book. Floyd E. 
Petty. J. O. 
Reiplinger, Frank 
Turner, Fred 

L.U. NO. 620, 
MADISON, N. J. 
McCormack, Henry F. 
Tuttle, Leslie 

L.U. NO. 640, 
NETCONG, N. J. 

Christir, Charles 

L.U. NO. 715, 
ELIZABETH, N. J. 

Lambert. J: Edward 
Mallon, Peter 

L.U. NO. 727, 
HIALEAH, FLA. 

Simons, W. J. 

L.U. NO. 742, 
DECATUR, ILL. 

Shelton, Joseph P. 

L.U. NO. 764, 
SHREVEPORT, LA. 

Graham, Arthur 
McAlexander, D. D. 

L.U. 787, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Paulsen, John 

L.U. NO. 791, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Anderson, Gustav 
Blyth, John 
Larsen, Sofus 

L.U. NO. 792, 
ROCKFORD, ILL. 

Anderson, Edwin 
Fairclough, Ernest 
Flint, Kenneth 
Karwelis, John 
Nilsson, Charles 
Omark, Oscar 

L.U. NO. 830, 
OIL CITY, PA. 

Echenoz, Raymond E. 

L.U. NO. 871, 
BATTLE CREEK, 
MICH. 

Harlin, Roy E. 

L.U. 950, 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 

O'Day, John 

L.U. NO. 982, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

England, William 
Romej, Bernard 
Van Linn, Norbert 
Holden, Walker B. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



L.U. NO. 998 
BERKLEY, MICH. 

Bailey, Harry J. 
Brock, Charles 
Calhoon, Jesse 
Dalbec, James 

L.U. NO. 998, 
BERKLEY, MICH. 

Holt. George. Sr. 
Johnson, Archie 
Jacobs, Chester, Sr. 
Krebiehl, Peter 
LaBair, Arthur 
Moyer, Curtis 
Rodgers, Sidney 
Van Leuven, Alfred 
Younger, Bennie 

L.U. NO. 1006, 
NEW BRUNSWICK, 

N. J. 

Appleton, Harry 
Rosen. Nathan 
Sorensen, Martin 

L.U. NO. 1065, 
SALEM, OREG. 

Boyce, Edgar 
Brown, William H. 
Gunn, DeLacey 
King, Charles E. 
Pettibone, Errol 
Quesnel, Oliver 
Reinwald, George 
Schroeder, S. N. 
Waldorf, Robert 

L.U. NO. 1124, 

NEWTON, N. J. 
Barber, Marshall Greer 

L.U. NO. 1134, 
MT. KISCO, N. Y. 

Lent, George E. 



L.U. NO. 1172, 
BILLINGS, MONT. 

Griep, Arnold 

L.U. NO. 1232, 
CORNER BROOK, 
NEWFOUNDLAND 

Carson. James 
Maculey, Angus 
Penny, Moses 

L.U. NO. 1292, 
HUNTINGTON, N. Y. 
Wandurskie, Joseph 

L.U. NO, 1337, 
TUSCALOOSA, ALA. 

Goodman. W. E. 

L.U. NO. 1394, 
FORT 
LAUDERDALE, FLA. 

Taylor. W. P. 

L.U. NO. 1397, 
ROSLYN, N.Y. 

Pearl, Philip 

L.U. NO. 1407, 

WILMINGTON, 

CALIF. 

Davis, Richard 
DeCamp, Jack E. 
Garcia, Ben M. 
Madalena, Frank R. 
Van Buskirk, Leo 
Wallick, William 

L.U. NO. 1419, 
JOHNSTOWN, PA. 

Klucik, Rudolph J. 
Horner, H. Dale 

L.U. NO. 1423, 
CORPUS CHRISTI, 
TEX. 

Wilkinson, Jesse G. 



L.U. NO. 1433, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Hilton, W. D. 
Jarvis, Jack 
Lehman, Warren C. 
Nuorala, Arthur 
Padgen, William 

L.U. NO. 1497, 
EAST LOS ANGELES, 
CALIF. 

Elby, Dan 

L.U. NO. 1507, 

EL MONTE, CALIF. 

Parrish, Lester 
Roberts, Frederick N. 
Shipley, Herbert 
Yates, George 

L.U. NO. 1550, 
QUINCY, MASS. 

Tuck, William 

L.U. NO. 1654, 
MIDLAND, MICH. 

Harsh, Ira J. 

L.U. NO. 1715, 
VANCOUVER, 
WASH. 

Anglin, William F. 
Bjorkum, Reider 
Denman, Carl A. 
King, Chester F. 
Leroy, L. B. 
Thorsen. Henry C. 

L.U. NO. 1725, 
DAYTONA BEACH, 
FLA. 

Dees, John W. 
Conklin. Edward 
Schwall, William B. 
Vancini, Primo 



L.U. NO. 1856, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Drab, John 
Graham, Alex 
Manners, John 
Nappi, Frank 
Riebrick, Paul 
Rose, Adam 
Thomas, Lemuel 
Van Horn, John, Sr. 
Troxell, Wesley 
Wagner, Randolph 
Zounczyk, John 

L.U. NO. 1922, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Crous, William, Sr. 
Swanquest, Charles 
Zika, John 

L.U. NO. 1925, 
COLUMBIA, MO. 

Cook, Jack Henderson 
Davis, Charles Henry 
Waters, Sr. Thomas P. 
Watson, Sr. Wilford H. 

L.U. NO. 2046, 
MARTINEZ, CALIF. 

Brasuell, Jess, Jr. 
Gales, Luther 
Stutler, Charles W. 
Walton, E. J. 

L.U. NO. 2203, 
ANAHEIM, CALIF. 

Granville, John P. 
Henderson, John P. 
Leichliter, Clarence E. 
Pittsenbarger, E. C. 
Rube, C. C. 
Thornton, Wayne G. 

L.U. NO. 2811, 
SALISBURY, MD. 

Adkins, James B. 




Woodcutters 'Look Good' in Heart Survey 

Results of medical surveys indicate that heart disease is less 
common among men engaged in heavy occupational work than 
among those employed in other occupations. 

An article in The Journal of Occupational Medicine has reported 
that a clinical and electrocardiographic study was made of 815 
men in an Eastern county of Finland. Men from 40 to 59 years 
old were studied. The main occupations in the area are forestry 
and small-scale farming. Of the 815 men studied, 380 were en- 
gaged either fully or part-time in woodcutting. 

The report pointed out that, although lumberjacks are engaged 
in the physically heaviest occupation known, they show signifi- 
cantly fewer electrocardiographic changes and fewer weaknesses 
or obstructions in their blood circulatory systems than all other 
men of the same age in the same area. 

The fact remains, however, heart diseases are the leading cause 
of death in the world today. There are an estimated 10,000,000 
Americans with cardiovascular diseases, and needless to say, most 
of these people are working people. 

February has been designated as Heart month for 1965. Your 
contribution can help stamp out America's No. 1 killer. SUPPORT 
THE LOCAL DRIVE OF THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIA- 
TION—GIVE TODAY. 



FEBRUARY, 1965 



37 




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Local 1(k>2's Annual Party for Its Children 




SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif.— Local 1632 of San Luis Obispo holds a Chilstmas party 
every year for the children of its members. As the pictures above and below show, 
Santa, a member of the local, interviews all the children and gives each a candy 
stocking and gifts. 




Carpenter's Son Helped by March of Dimes 



New York, N. Y. — For years research 
scientists have been trying to puzzle out 
the causes of the multitude of birth 
defects suffered by humans, and. while 
much more work is needed, some answers 
have been pinned down in just the past 
few years. These advances are of little 
value unless brought directly to the pa- 
tient who needs this specialized care. 

To make the new-found knowledge 
available to more patients more rapidly, 
the National Foundation has established 
more than 50 March of Dimes Birth 
Defects Centers across the nation. These 
centers provide early diagnosis and treat- 
ment for many different types of birth 
defects ranging from abnormalities in 



body structure to imbalances in body 
chemistry. 

Recently, in Pennsylvania, the son of 
a member of the Brotherhood was born 
with a spinal defect known as spina 
befida or open spine. This defect was 
repaired (but not cured) by surgery 
shortly after his birth, and he has been 
fitted with braces and crutches which 
enable him to walk. He is treated at a 
March of Dimes Birth Defects Center 
in Philadelphia twice a week where he 
learns how to handle his crutches, how 
to put his braces on by himself, and, 
very important, how to fall so he won't 
injure himself. 

GIVE TO THE MARCH OF DIMES. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



— LAKELAND NEWS— 

Clarence Ray of Local Union 993, Miami, Fla„ arrived at the Home 
December 7, 1964. 

M. B. Coone of Local Union 198. Dallas, Texas, arrived at the Home 
December 7. 1964. 

Axel Nelson of Local Union 1695, Providence, R. I., arrived at the Home 
December 17. 1964. 

Theodore Kirkensgard of Local Union 1394, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., arrived 
at the Home December 21, 1964. 

Wilfred J. Picard of Local Union 107, Worcester, Mass., arrived at the 
Home December 23, 1964. 

George Edson of Local Union 53. White Plains. N. Y., passed away 
December 11, 1964 and was buried in the Home cemetery. His sister and 
nephew attended services. 

Myron Smith of Local Union 434. Chicago, 111., passed away December 12, 
1964 and was buried in the Home cemetery. His daughter attended services. 

Charles Schelderfer of Local Union 409, New Canaan, Conn., passed away 
December 17, 1964 and was buried in New Canaan, Conn. 

William Morton of Local Union 993, Miami, Fla.. passed away December 
19, 1964. His body was cremated and the ashes buried in our cemetery. 

John Stirling of Local Union 746, Norwalk, Conn., passed away December 
12, 1964 and was buried in New York City. 

Union Members Who Visited the Home During December 

Joseph S. Krisback, L.U. 558, Elmhurst, 111. 
E. J. Hider, L.U. 1296, San Diego, Calif. 
William E. Jette, L.U. Ill, Lawrence, Mass. 
T. Mandelbaum, L.U. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 

J. V. Ginn, L.U. 3130, Hampton, S.C., now living in Varnville, S. C. 
Millard Laphart, L.U. 191, York, Pa. 

Niels Anderson. L.U. 1456, Union, N. Y., now living in Ft. Lauderdale. Fla. 
James Ward, L.U. 1483, New York, N. Y. 

William J. Struthers, L.U. 2712, Pompano Beach, Fla., now living in Lake- 
land, Fla. 

Patrick Moran, L.U. 13, Chicago, 111. 

Wayne V. Lutes, L.U. 639, Akron, Ohio, now living in Brewster. Ohio. 

J. E. Sheppard, L.U. 1509, Miami, Fla.. now living in Vero Beach, Fla. 

Henry Gustafson, L.U. 62, Chicago, 111., now living in Balsam Lake. Wise. 

N. H. Olson, L.U. 470, Tacoma, Wash. 

William M. Smith, L.U. 1929, Cleveland, Ohio, now living in Palmetto, Fla. 

Fred C. Hosang, L.U. 1287. Delaware, Ohio. 

Edward Minard, L.U. 1665, Washington. D. C. 

Henry E. Rabb, L.U. 993. Miami, Fla., now living in Dunedin, Fla. 

G. B. Gentry, L.U. 101, Baltimore, Md. 

G. R. Seybert, L.U. 545. Vandergrift, Pa. 

Lewis Bosick, L.U. 105, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Gordon Casper, L.U. 242, Chicago, 111. 

Swan Paulson, L.U. 1394, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

C. Eric Johanson, L.U. 97, St. Paul, Minn. 
Herbert A. Ott, Sr., L.U. 232, Columbia City, Ind. 
Albert H. Coif, L.U. 502, Penn Yan, N. Y. 

Fred Tripp, L.U. 899. Parkersburg. W. Va., now living in Mason, W. Va. 

D. S. Wilkerson, Sr., L.U. 776, Marshall, Tex. 
Arthur C. Brown, L.U. 1685, Cocoa, Fla. 
Stanley W. Davis. L.U. 101, Bel Air, Md. 
Harry Robinson, L.U. 174, Joliet, 111. 

Clyde Hanna, L.U. 435, East Liverpool, Ohio. 

Edward J. Gallogly, L.U. 1590, Washington. D. C. 

Peter Kemppi, L.U. 15, Hackensack, N. L, now living in Tarpon Springs, Fla. 

Richard Nyman, L.U. 1509, Miami, Fla. 

John Anfruns, L.U. 1725, Ormond Beach, Fla. 

A. N. Christensen, L.U. 1648, Dana Point, Calif., now living in S. Laguna. 
Calif. 

Oscar A. O'Kelley, L.U. 225, Atlanta, Ga., now living in Jacksonville, Fla. 

Bert E. Christian, L.U. 168, Kansas City, Kans., now living in Bonner 
Springs, Kans. 

Erasmus E. Eck, L.U. 368, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Berent A. Pedersen, L.U. 1456, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

William G. Tanner, L.U. 854, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

John Ectvedt, L.U. 1456, Rockaway, N. J. 

Joseph Fiore, L.U. 2155, Brooklyn, N. Y. 




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FEBRUARY, 1965 



39 




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M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 



The Buyer Needs Protection From The Shell Games 



^HERE'S A NEW KIND of addiction running 
■*■ loose in our society, says Congresswoman Leonor 
K. Sullivan of Missouri. It might be called the easy- 
credit addiction. 

The easy-credit addict is the fellow whose eyes be- 
come glazed with anticipation at the sight of a credit 
card. Or it might be the woman whose life revolves 
around a revolving charge account. 

He is the daring consumer who is purchasing a $700 
stereo console in a downtown store, while another 
store has a truck backed up to his home to repossess 
his refrigerator. 

The easy-credit addict's problem is that merchants 
keep filling his life with unlimited credit proposals and 
creating things which he just has to have. He doesn't 
know when to say "when." 

There are "massive assaults being made on the 
human intelligence" by advertisers, says Esther Peter- 
son, another woman leader concerned with easy credit. 
Mrs. Peterson is special advisor to President Johnson 
on consumer problems, and she finds her job of press- 
ing importance in our nation's growing economy. 

American women are going to "revolt against the 
humbug" of Madison Avenue advertising techniques, 
she says, but she warns that Federal and State govern- 
ments should take action now to protect consumers 
from the many shell games presented to them in the 
course of a shopping day. 

The AFL-CIO Executive Council took note of the 
growing problems of consumers at its recent meeting 
in Washington. It called upon Congress to enact leg- 
islation to protect the consumer on installment buying, 



packaging and drugs, and it urged the creation of a 
Federal consumer information service. 

"It has been clear for a long time that the American 
consumer is at a serious disadvantage in dealing with 
sharp lenders and unethical merchants," said the AFL- 
CIO leaders. "A number of measures to aid the con- 
sumer that have already been proposed deserve enact- 
ment.* 

One of these measures is a simple requirement that 
an installment buyer should know how much interest 
he is really paying. 

Another asks that packaged goods give a clear indi- 
cation of what's inside each package — in terms that 
the buyer can understand without a slide rule or a 
scientific dictionary. It's time this "amazing Formula 
X" is explained in everyday language! 

Though every American is a consumer in one form 
or another, there is no major lobbying group rep- 
resenting the rank-and-file consumer in the nation's 
capital. Consequently, organized labor and other or- 
ganizations concerned with consumer problems have 
rough going when they push consumer legislation in 
Congress. 

The "truth in lending" bill proposed by Senator 
Paul Douglas of Illinois was killed by one of the most 
powerful assemblages of business organizations that 
ever set out to beat a bill on Capitol Hill. 

Well, this is a new Congress. President Johnson has 
called for protective consumer legislation. As we 
stated in our report on the AFL-CIO Legislative 
Conference, Page 6 of this issue, "The time for action 
is now!" 



40 



THE CARPENTER 







GENERAL OFFICERS OF: 



GENERAL OFFICE: 



THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 101 Constitution Ave., N w , 

Washington 1, D. C. 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington 1. D. C. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Finlay C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave.. N.W.. 

Washington 1, D. C. 



second general vice president 
William Sidell 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washinaton 1, D. C. 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington 1. D. C. 



general treasurer 
Peter Terzick 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington 1, D. C. 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St.. New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 

Third District, Harry Schwarzer 
16678 State Road, North Royalton, Ohio 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16, Minn. 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 10, Mo. 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 

1126 American Bank Bldg., 

621 S. W. Morrison St., Portland 5, Ore. 

Eighth District, Patrick Hogan 
8564 Melrose Ave.. Los Angeles, Calif. 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent. Toronto 7, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave.. Vancouver 12. B. C. 



M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

All correspondence for the General Executive Board 
must be sent to the General Secretary. 



WE NEED YOUR 

LOCAL UNION 

NUMBER 

Because we are chang- 
ing over our mail list to 
our new computer, it is 
impossible for us to add, 
subtract, or change an 
address if we do not have 
your Local Union num- 
ber. Therefore, if you 
want your name added to 
the mail list of the jour- 
nal, or if you want it 
taken off, or if you want 
your address changed, 
please include your Local 
Union No. in your re- 
quest. Thank you for 
your cooperation. 

PETER TERZICK 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 



NAME 



Local # 



OLD ADDRESS 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



City 



NEW ADDRESS. 



Zone 



State 



.Local # 



City 



Zone 



State 



PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington 1, D. C. 

BE SURE TO WRITE IN YOUR LOCAL UNION NUMBER 




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Using the Right Hammer 

There's no such thing as an "all-purpose" 
hammer. That's why you should have a ham- 
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types of hammers to see why any handy- 
man needs at least two or three hammers 
just to handle ordinary fix-it jobs around the 
house and yard. 

CARPENTER'S HAMMER 

A good carpenter's hammer has 
a slight crown to the working or 

striking face for driving nails 
straight at full force. Claws have 
narrow, sharp "V" for pulling 
the thinnest brads. Most comrfion weight is 
16 ounces. The steel-handled Stanley 
"Steelmaster" hammer is preferred 
because of its ability to withstand greater 
prying strains and because the handle will 
never loosen. 

RIPPING HAMMER 

/ This type has straight claws for 
/ easily inserting or chopping 



rdown into work being torn apart. 
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BALL PEIN 



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machinery parts. Complete size range. 

TACK HAMMER 

A magnetic tack hammer will 



come in handy quite often. Its 
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(STANLEY No. H601). 



LOOK for THIS 

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on the face of 

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When you hit a "foul blow" on the rim, 
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Official Publication of the 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 



CMPINTI1 



FOUNDED 1881 



MARCH, 1965 



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SECURE YOURSELF, YOUR 
TOOLS, AND MATERIALS 
AGAINST HIGH WINDS 

1 I /a\ II 





THE 



(SfiuaiP 




VOLUME LXXXV 



No. 3 



MARCH, 1965 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Acting Editor 



vrr..„ 1 
LABOR PRESS! 



IN THISJSSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Appalachia, First Battleground Against Poverty 

New Jurisdictional Disputes Board Set Up 

World's Largest Food Processing Plant 

Scrap-Plywood Ideas Pay Off for Members 12 

The Craftsman Hilda Worthington Smith 15 

New York Bank Displays Millwrights' Skills 18 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 

Editorials 10 

Leveling on the Issues 14 

Canadian Section 16 

We Congratulate 19 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 20 

Plane Gossip 22 

Local Union News 25 

What's New 35 

In Memoriam 36 

Lakeland News 38 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 

Official Information Inside Back Cover 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N. E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20ft in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

Almost incomprehensible is the 
fact that today, in a nation of 190 
million souls, there are still more 
than 30 million plunged in the 
depths of despair which comes with 
poverty. Lacking the resources and 
education which are necessary for 
self-help, they must look to the out- 
side for aid. 

The comfortable majority of us, 
unimaginably wealthy by the 
world's standards, must provide op- 
portunity for the have-not Ameri- 
cans to come up from poverty. 

Although there are many sections 
of the country sorely in need of help 
— the Ozarks; parts of Texas, Neva- 
da and Arizona; the Mississippi 
Delta and Lake Superior regions — 
Appalachia is the hard core of de- 
privation. 

There, on a mountain chain 
which stretches from Pennsylvania, 
southwestward into Alabama, more 
than half of the nation's destitute 
live among less than one tenth of 
our people. 

The article on page 2 examines 
the plight of Appalachia in depth. 
Just what has happened to make 
men in their prime sit idly in the 
sun on a weathered front porch? 
Or make shacks disintegrate slowly 
while children try to wrest what 
pleasure they can out of a dusty lot 
and a hill? 




nppnui(Hm 




Bleak winter snow brings 
added problems to a small 
West Virginia community. 



Appalachia is a 10-state swath of 
human misery which sweeps out of 
Pennsylvania southward almost to the 
Gulf of Mexico, down the Appalachian 
Mountain backbone of the East Coast. 
Astride the ridges are portions of 
Maryland, Ohio, Kentucky, Virginia, 
North Carolina, Tennessee. Georgia 
and Alabama, in addition to a large 
portion of Pennsylvania and the entire 
state of West Virginia. 

That mountainous state is the heart- 
land of the poverty belt. U.S.A. Just 
about all of its territory is character- 
ized by the combination of geographi- 
cal and economic conditions which 
have brought poverty to the entire 
Appalachian chain. West Virginia is 
isolated. Its economy grew up and 
fattened temporarily on industries 



which drew wealth out of the land 
and returned little of the profit to the 
source. Timber and coal were the props 
for the economy in years gone by. 

There was a time when Appalachia's 
black gold supported a human beehive 
of activity, although in those days 
employment did not necessarily bring 
material well-being. If nothing else, 
Appalachians at least had the self- 
respect of a job. 

Then came fuel competition. Oil, 
gasoline, pipeline natural gas, massive 
electric power distribution systems and 
the death of the coal-fired steam loco- 
motive combined to almost kill the 
coal industry. For the past 40 years, 
the coal market has been dwindling, 
and the unemployment rate has been 
declining even faster. Technological 



advances in coal mining methods have 
far outpaced the development of social 
tools to adjust to the changes. 

Automation and mechanization have 
taken a fearful toll in Appalachia. 
Although the region provides about 
% of the nation's entire supply of 
bituminous coal, and every flake of 
anthracite, production dropped 32 per 
cent between 1951 and 1961. In the 
same ten-year period, employment 
plunged by 66 per cent. Although 
there has been a slight increase in 
production in recent years, employment 
continues to fall off. 

Hardwood timber, the second staple 
in Appalachia's earlier years, was neg- 
lected after the coal industry began 
to slide, and replacement of hardwoods 
by substitute materials and new. labor- 

THE CARPENTER 




FIRST BATTLEGROUND 

IN THE 'WAR ON POVERTY' 



saving methods of construction in the 
furniture and building industries cut 
into the market. 

When the tide of opportunity moved 
elsewhere in the country, masses of 
people in the Appalachian mining and 
timbering districts were left without 
employment. Many had too little to 
even consider moving out to new 



economic frontiers. Others, who might 
possibly have made the move, felt 
bound by ties of family and home. 
But even so, in just ten years from 
1950 to 1960, an army of 2 million 
people left the region. 

The deprived remainder of about 
17 million suffers from 11 per cent 
of all national unemployment, with 




• ••••• INTERSTATE SYSTEM 



I'MENT ROADS 



A KEY TO PROSPERITY for Appalachia is an adequate system of highways. 
Many roads are impassable in winter and washed out in summer. The bulk of 
the aid money to Appalachia under the Administration-sponsored bill would be 
used to build 2.350 miles of highways and 1,000 miles of local access roads. 



only 5 per cent of the labor force. 
Almost one family in three in Appala- 
chia must survive, somehow, on $3,000 
a year, or less. The ratio elsewhere, 
although still appalling in the world's 
richest nation, is one poverty-struck 
family in five. 

It's true, of course, that there are 
some prosperous metropolitan centers 
within the Appalachian region. Erie, 
Scranton Wilkes-Barre, Weirton, Pitts- 
burgh and Johnstown, Pa.; Winston- 
Salem, Asheville, Knoxville, Chattan- 
ooga, Huntsville and Birmingham are 
hardly collapsing. Serving as broker 
between the resource-rich interior and 
the country, these cities have a stand- 
ard of living above the Appalachian 
norm, and in some cases, even above 
the national level. 

And there are other areas of the 
nation afflicted with poverty. The 
Ozarks, Mississippi Delta and Lake 
Superior regions; parts of Nevada, 
Arizona and Texas. But Appalachia 
is the hard core — the home of over 
one-half of the Americans whose in- 
come is below bare subsistence. Over 
one-half of the penniless in a region 
with represents less than one-tenth of 
the total U. S. population. 

If we can bring these Appalachians 
back to productivity, restore them to 
their lost share of our cumulative 
wealth, the solution to restoring other 
national pockets of poverty should be 
available. And although the problems 
of Appalachia, may seem remote to 
those who do not live there, the tre- 
mors of economic impact are felt, 
however lightly, everywhere. 

When he outlined his program for 
the attack on poverty. President John- 
son said, "This investment will return 
its cost many fold to our entire econ- 
omy. If we can raise the annual earn- 
ings of 10 million among our poor 
people by only $1,000 — we will have 
added $14 billion a year to our national 
output . . . not mentioning what we 
will have done for these people them- 
selves. 

"In so doing, we can make impor- 



MARCH, 1965 



tant reductions in public assistance 
payments which now cost us $4 billion 
a year; and in the large costs of 
fighting crime and delinquency, dis- 
ease and hunger. Our history has 
proved that each time we broaden 
the base of abundance, giving more 
people the chance to produce and 
consume, we create new industry. 
higher production, increased earnings 
and better income for everyone." 

It has been pointed out that for 
every two lumberjacks working in 
the woods at the stump, there must 
be five men employed elsewhere to 
process the timber into finished 
products. 

The coal industry, no matter how 
it might be revitalized, cannot alone 
support a thriving economy in Appa- 
lachia . . . nor can the farmland 
completely support a totally agri- 
cultural economy. The farms are too 
small in most cases, and the terrain 
is too rugged to permit use of modern, 
efficient techniques. Almost half the 
farms in the region have gross in- 
comes under $2,000 a year. 

Because Appalachia grew up de- 
pendent on the rails for communi- 
cations, it is cut off from most of 
today's heavily truck-oriented com- 
merce. For the most part, small, self- 
contained communities grew up 
around each mining or timbering cen- 
ter, and established few links with 
others. Town size remains small. Pub- 
lic facilities, such as sewer, water, 
power, waste disposal, hospitals and 
police protection are non-existent or 
wholly inadequate in most of Appa- 
lachia. 

In West Virginia, for example, the 
isolation of two tiny communities is 
typical. To travel 45 miles from a 
major city to the first settlement re- 
quires 35 miles on one of three roads 
serving the entire country, five miles 
of gravel road, three miles of dirt 
road, and two miles on foot up a steep 
hill. Just on the other side of the hill 
from there is another small com- 
munity, but to reach it by auto- 
mobile it is necessary to drive back 
down dirt and gravel road to the 
highway, then back up progressively 
deteriorating roads once more. The 
mileage indicator would spin off 23 
miles for the trip. 

In wintertime, Appalachia's roads 
are mostly impassable. In summer, 
many are washed out. Isolation is so 
complete that many school age chil- 
dren — beyond the reach of the school 
bus — are not required to attend at 
all. Poverty is so compelling that one 
youth participating in a pilot pro- 
gram preferred a swim across the 



Kanawha River to paying a 5 cent toll 
for a pedestrian bridge. 

As may easily be imagined, there 
is a critical lack of trained, skilled 
manpower in Appalachia. 

Just 5 of every hundred Appala- 
chians have a college degree, com- 
pared with a national ratio of 8 to 
100. 

For the most part, Appalachia is a 
region almost without industry, and 
incapable of supporting itself off its 
own land. The way to get Appalachia 
back on its feet, most planners agree, 
is to provide it with the catalyst 
which will trigger development of a 
sound economic base for comfortable 
life. 

Appalachia's problems were studied 
in depth by a Presidential Commis- 
sion on the Appalachian Region. 
During the 1960 election campaign, 
President Kennedy visited the region, 
and promised to do something about 
conditions there. The Commission 
was formed, and in 1964, its report 
was published. President Johnson im- 
mediately sought money from Con- 
gress to begin rehabilitation, along 
the lines suggested by the Com- 
mission. 

The most important element in any 
Appalachian rehabilitation, the plan- 
ners point out, is better use of the 
abundant natural resources of the re- 
gion — coal, water, timber, and other 
mineral wealth. 

"The conversion and processing of 
its (Appalachia's) raw materials should 
be done locally to the fullest extent 
possible," the Commission report 
states, recalling the loss of wealth to 
outside areas that accompanied the 
first timber and mining booms. Also, 
"New industries, dependent not on 
the resources of the region, but on 
the strategic location and potential 
market which Appalachia repre- 
sents, must be located in the region. 

"The magnificent recreational re- 
sources must be developed with co- 
ordinated intensity if their employ- 
ment potential is to be realized. Ag- 
ricultural diversification should be ac- 
celerated and mining and timber em- 
ployment and income expanded." 

Water resources — which could be 
of great benefit to the region — are 
neglected now. Unchecked by dams or 
other control measures, spring floods 
tear away the mountain sides and fill 
the valleys. Industrial and sewage 
contamination threaten much of the 
game and fish which, up to now, 
abound in Appalachia. 

Although proposed legislation for 
Appalachian aid closely paralleling 



the recommendations of the Presi- 
dent's Commission was passed in the 
U.S. Senate last year, the House failed 
to act on it before adjournment. 

President Johnson has been deter- 
mined that the legislation should get 
priority treatment during this session 
of Congress, and the Appalachian 
bill is the second major measure up 
for consideration. 

By mid-February, the Senate had 
approved a $1.16 billion measure, 
and hearings had begun in the House 
on the companion bill. Chances for 
passage look good. Johnson's legisla- 
tive program has been bolstered by 
the support he received at the polls, 
and the increase in the number of 
Democrats in the Congress. Poverty- 
aid measures are also getting some 
prominent Republican support. Mi- 
nority party leader in the Senate — 
Everett M. Dirksen — voted in favor 
of the Appalachian aid bill. 

The Senate measure would appor- 
tion the bulk of the money — $840 
million — to an improved road system. 
A total of 2,350 miles of main high- 
ways and 11,000 miles of secondary 
roads would be built to penetrate the 
social and economic isolation of Ap- 
palachia. The rest of the aid money 
would be used to establish health fa- 
cilities, to reclaim land ravaged by 
strip mining and flood, and begin 
work on revitalizing the timber in- 
dustry. Also, underdeveloped land 
would be converted to a promising 
beef husbandry industry. Water re- 
sources study would begin, and money 
would be provided for vocational 
training. 

The transportation network receives 
priority because it is the key to every 
other part of Appalachia aid. Rather 
than develop the heavily traveled 
routes, the Commission report rec- 
ommended, new roads should be run 
into areas with the most develop- 
ment potential. 

To bring higher standards of health 
and nutrition to Appalachia, the 
President's Commission asked for 
several demonstration community cen- 
ters for treatment of disease, as well 
as research. 

Great promise is seen for develop- 
ment of an expanded beef cattle in- 
dustry in Appalachia. Much of the 
acreage which is unsuitable for the 
plow would be put to work to meet 
the ever-increasing national demands 
for beef. This should be the area of 
major attention in agriculture, the 
Commission reported. 

And although Appalachia's timber 

industry now exceeds the demand, 

Continued on page 23 



THE CARPENTER 



President Lyndon Johnson beams with 
satisfaction as C. J. Haggerty, 
president of the AFL-CIO Building 
and Construction Trades Department, 
signs the document establishing a 
new National Joint Board for the 
Settlement of Jurisdictional Disputes. 
Though the White House was not 
officially a participant in the labor- 
management agreement, President 
Johnson offered his personal 
blessing to the pact. 



New Plan 

To Settle 

Jurisdictional 

Disputes 

Is Adopted 




OFFICIALS of the AFL-CIO 
building and construction un- 
ions and the contractors they deal 
with, have worked more than a year 
to set up a new system for settling 
jurisdictional disputes designed to 
prevent work stoppages in the in- 
dustry and to replace a former dis- 
putes plan which seemed to satisfy 
nobody. 

International President Maurice 
A. Hutcheson attended a White 
House ceremony last month, at 
which the signing of the new plan 
was witnessed by President Lyndon 
Johnson and other Administration 
officials. Though the government is 
in no way involved in the plan, 
President Johnson has been diligent 
in seeking labor-management peace. 

The agreement provides for major 
reorganization of the machinery of 



the National Joint Board for the 
Settlement of Jurisdictional Dis- 
putes, a voluntary industrial rela- 
tions body established by construc- 
tion labor and management 1 5 years 
ago. 

For labor, the new Joint Board 
plan was signed by President C. J. 
Haggerty and Secretary-Treasurer 
Frank Bonadio of the Building and 
Construction Trades Department of 
the AFL-CIO, representing the 3,- 
500,000 members of its 18 affiliated 
international unions. For manage- 
ment, the plan was signed by repre- 
sentatives of the Associated General 
Contractors of America and the par- 
ticipating specialty contractors em- 
ployers associations. 

Major changes included in the 
new agreement call for: 

1. Establishment of a new Ap- 



peals Board, headed by an impartial 
umpire, to render final decisions. In 
the past any appeal from a decision 
of the National Joint Board could 
be taken only to the same tribunal. 

2. Protection of the interests of 
the consumer in the settlement of 
jurisdictional disputes, with due re- 
gard given to such factors as effi- 
ciency and economy of operation. 

3. Definition of the criteria to be 
used by the Joint Board in making 
decisions. These include decisions 
and agreements of record as set 
forth in the "Green Book" — the 
jurisdictional "bible" of valid agree- 
ments between affected international 
unions attested by the chairman of 
the Joint Board, established trade 
practice and prevailing practice in 
the locality. 

4. Consultation with appropriate 



MARCH, 1965 




SIGNING THE NEW PACT following ceremonies at the White House were 
the representatives of labor and management shown above. Among those 
shown here, starting at the far right, are Peter Fosco, general secretary-treasurer 
of the Laborers; the United Brotherhood's General President Maurice Huteh- 
eson; Gordon Freeman, president of the International Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers; and Lawrence M. Raftery, president of the Painters. 



New Plan For Jurisdictional Disputes 

Continued from page 5 



management groups in the negotia- 
tion of jurisdictional agreements be- 
tween international unions. 

Arrangements are being made for 
rotating membership on the Joint 
Board, so that all unions and par- 
ticipating employers will have the 
opportunity from year to year to 
serve in the decision-making proc- 
ess. No union representative or em- 
ployer will be permitted to sit in 
judgment on a case in which his un- 
ion or company is directly involved. 

The rules of the National Joint 
Board, it was emphasized, provide 
that there shall be no stoppage of 
work while disputes referred to it 
are under consideration. The same 
rule will apply with regard to the 
Appeals Board. 

In a joint statement issued after 
the signing of the new agreement, 
representatives of the participating 
groups said: 

"This agreement is the fulfillment 
of more than a year's negotiations 
between representatives of labor and 
management in the construction in- 
dustry with a view to perfecting the 
machinery established for the or- 
derly and equitable settlement of 
jurisdictional disputes. Such dis- 
putes involve complex problems 



arising from the introduction of new 
materials and processes in the rap- 
idly advancing construction indus- 
try, which accounts for one-seventh 
of the gross national product each 
year and thus deeply affects all 
American industry. 

"We firmly believe we have come 
up with a plan which will work to 
the best interests of the employes, 
the employers and the nation as a 
whole. 

"It is our purpose to make use of 
the new machinery to reduce sub- 
stantially jurisdictional delays in pri- 
vate, public and national defense 
construction covered by this agree- 
ment. We are determined to exer- 
cise our responsibility to bring about 
that desirable objective. At the 
same time, we believe it will serve 
the public interest for labor and 
management in this industry to solve 
internal jurisdictional problems with 
a maximum of practical judgment 
and fairness and with a minimum of 
government intervention." 

President Johnson hailed the 
agreement as "a fine example of 
free and responsible collective bar- 
gaining*' and noted pointedly that 
the federal government had played 
no part in its attainment. 



"Your agreement is not the result 
of any governmental edict of inter- 
vention," he observed. "It is the 
successful product of long and hard 
negotiations and it provides a better 
way of settling jurisdictional disputes 
in the construction industry privately 
and without work stoppages. 

"I believe that this agreement 
should limit the use of governmental 
dispute settlement procedures as 
Congress intended. I am sure it will 
help expedite our defense construc- 
tion program and pave the way for 
continued expansion of industrial, 
commercial and residential construc- 
tion." 

The agreement was signed by W. 
Ray Rogers, president, and William 
E. Dunn, executive director, of the 
Associated General Contractors of 
America; Leon B. Kromer and Ed- 
ward S. Torrence, representing the 
participating specialty contractors 
employers associations, which in- 
clude the National Electrical Con- 
tractors Association, Insulation Dis- 
tributor-Contractors National Asso- 
ciation, National Association of 
Plumbing, Heating and Cooling 
Contractors, Mechanical Contrac- 
tors Association of America, Gyp- 
sum Drywall Contractors Interna- 
tional, Painting and Decorating Con- 
tractors of America, and Sheet Metal 
& Air Conditioning Contractors Na- 
tional Association. 

In addition to the agreement, new 
rules of procedure for the National 
Joint Board were adopted and 
signed by members of the National 
Joint Negotiating Committee. Mr. 
Haggerty is chairman of the com- 
mittee, and its other members are 
Gordon M. Freeman, president of 
the International Brotherhood of 
Electrical Workers; Peter Fosco, 
general secretary-treasurer of the 
Laborers Union; Maurice A. Hutch- 
eson, president of the Carpenters' 
International; Lawrence M. Raftery, 
president of the Painters' Interna- 
tional; Peter T. Schoemann, presi- 
dent of the Plumbers' International; 
Carl M. Halvorson, Portland, Oreg., 
and William E. Naumann, Tucson, 
Ariz., representing the Associated 
General Contractors of America; 
Leon B. Kromer and Edward S. 
Torrence, representing the partici- 
pating specialty contractors employ- 
ers associations. 



THE CARPENTER 




Washington ROUNDUP 



A MEMORIAL BOOK expressing the deep sentiments of trade unionists in the labor 
press at the time of the assassination of President Kennedy will have a special 
place in the John F. Kennedy Memorial Library. A scrapbook collection of 
clippings from the labor press was presented to Sargent Shriver, brother-in-law 
of the slain President, by the International Labor Press Association at a recent 
luncheon meeting in Washington. 

TAKE-HOME PAY of factory production workers and its "real" purchasing power went 
up during January to a new high, despite another new peak for the cost-of-living. 
Average take-home pay hit an all-time top of $95.13 for a worker with three 
dependents, and $87.22 for a worker with no dependents and higher withholding 
taxes. Buying power was cut somewhat by a one-tenth of one per cent increase in 
the cost of living, but still was up 4-^-% over the year. Higher prices for fresh 
vegetables, gasoline and used cars caused the boost. 

AN ADMINISTRATION OF AGING affiliated with the Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare is proposed in a bill recently introduced in Congress by Senator Pat 
McNamara (D. , Mich.) and Rep. John E. Fogarty (D. , R. I.). Entitled "The Older 
Americans Act of 1965," the bill would authorize a total of $28.5 million in 
Federal grants over a three-year period to states and public or private nonprofit 
agencies for research, training, community planning and demonstration projects 
relating to aging. Over the three-year period, a total of $21 million would be 
authorized for states. In addition, public or private nonprofit agencies would 
receive $7.5 million over the three-year period for research, training and 
demonstration projects in the field of aging. A new position of Commissioner on 
Aging would be created by the bill. This would be subject to confirmation by the 
Senate. It also provides for a 16-member Advisory Committee on Older Americans, 
with the Commissioner on Aging as chairman. 

FARM OWNERS were told by the U. S. Department of Labor recently that they must 
offer higher wages and better working conditions to U. S. farm workers before the 
Labor Department will permit them to import alien workers for seasonal jobs. The 
Department set minimum standards which must be met before growers can bring in 
field labor from Mexico and other countries. 

COLD SHOULDER— The secretary-general of the Yugoslavian Federation of Labor, 
Vukomonovich Tempo, toured the U. S. a few weeks ago with State Department 
credentials. The AFL-CIO alerted its affiliates to the fact that Communist Yugo- 
slavia has no democratic trade union movement, as we know it, and that Tempo was 
considered by the AFL-CIO as persona non-grata. As a result, Tempo was received 
socially in only one city — Detroit — and the welcome there was none too 
cordial. 

NAME DROPPING-In the October, 1964, issue we told of the Atomic Energy Com- 
mission's studies of wood-plastic combinations called "Novawood." Although re- 
search in radiation-processed wood-plastic continues, the term "Novawood" has been 
dropped by AEC because it sounds too much like a trade name. 




Architect's rendering of the $25 million A&I* food processing plant now under con- 
struction in Horseheads, N. Y. The 1,500,000 square foot plant will cover 35 acres. 



World's 
Largest Food 
Processing 
Plant 



Elmira, N. Y. Local 532 
Members Helping Build 
Huge Facility for A & P 




HISTORY of a sort is being made 
in a small town in New York 
State with the unlikely name of Horse- 
heads (pop. 7,207). Here a crew of 
Elmira, N. Y. Local 532 members are 
helping construct what will be the 
largest food processing plant in the 
world. 

Being built for The Great Atlantic 
& Pacific Tea Company, Inc., the na- 
tion's biggest food chain, at a cost of 
$25 million, the plant will be located 
on a 104-acre site. 

Ground-breaking ceremonies for the 
plant were held in October, 1963, and 
shortly afterwards crews of Local 532 
members were commuting the six miles 
up Route 13/17 from Elmira to work 
on the huge A & P plant. In March, 
1964, the contract to manufacture and 
erect the precast concrete beams, floor 
and roof slabs, and side wall panels 
was let to the W. P. Dickerson & Son 
Company of Youngwood, Penna. 
Dickerson then signed both manufac- 
turing and erection contracts with Lo- 
cal 532. C. A. Wambold, business 
representative of Local 532, gives much 
of the credit for the successful signing 
of these contracts to the efforts of 
Representative Pat Campbell. Wam- 
bold also praised Representative Wil- 
liam Lawyer for his diligence and 
alertness in protecting our interests in 
the A & P project. 

The initial work performed by our 
members at Horseheads consisted in 
the erection of a huge casting plant 



on a site about a half mile from the 
general construction area. This work 
involved the building of foundations 
for and setting 8,000 feet of metal 
concrete forms. In full operation, the 
casting plant employed approximately 
100 men, all affiliated with Local 532. 

When the plant is completed some- 
time late this year, it will provide 35 
acres of manufacturing area under a 
single roof — the largest food plant of 
its kind in the world. In addition to 
its food processing facilities, it will 
have complete equipment for the fabri- 
cation of cans required for its food 
packing operations. 

The second phase of construction 
on the plant, located about 20 miles 
from the Pennsylvania border in the 
south central part of New York State, 
began with the erection of beams and 
slabs in June, 1964. This phase re- 
quired two seven-man crews from Lo- 
cal 532, each consisting of a foreman, 
two riggers (tag-line men), one signal- 
man, two carpenters landing and plac- 
ing the load, and one welder. As work 
progressed it later became necessary 
to hire two more welders. Testimony 
to the safety-consciousness of the Lo- 
cal 532 members employed on the 
project is the fact that this entire part 
of the job was done with only one 
work injury. 

As this issue of the Carpenter goes 
to press the entire facility is now 
roofed over and our members are 
working the winter months under 
cover. 



THE CARPENTER 





nisi 



Top left — Two Local 532 mem- 
bers weld and assemble re- 
inforcing frames for pre-cast 
concrete beams in casting 
yard located near the A&P 
plant site. 

Top right — Cables are shown 
being pre-stressed in casting 
yard. Cables will be used to 
reinforce Double "T" concrete 
beams. Three Local 532 mem- 
bers check cable stressing 
machine. 

Bottom right — Pre-stressed 
beams and Double "T's" are 
placed in position by track- 
mounted crane. 

Bottom left — Huge Double "T" 
concrete beam is positioned, 
by six-man Local 532 crew. 
Beams will serve as walls of 
new plant. 

Right center — Re-inforcing 
mesh in Double "T" casting 
bed is carefully checked prior 
to pouring. All photos on 
this page were taken by 
C. A. Wambold, bus. rep. 
of Local 532. 

Left center — Concrete is 
poured over casting form. 
Over 8,000 feet of casting 
forms were used to build plant 
superstructure. 








EDITORIALS 



* GREATNESS WITHOUT TARNISH 

"The purest treasure mortal times afford is spotless 
reputation." 

Shakespeare (Richard II) 

When the gaunt specter of Death reached down to 
take Sir Winston Churchill by the hand, it had to 
have been with the great tenderness and respect, which 
his illustrious career and life of dedicated service 
surely demanded. 

Few immortals of each generation are privileged 
to achieve the universal admiration which "Winnie" 
so gracefully accepted; almost, it would seem, with 
a good-natured humility. 

It should never be forgotten that this great man 
was a life-long politician. He had to be constantly 
re-elected in order to maintain his inspirational ac- 
tivity within the British government. Had he previ- 
ously failed at the polls, he never would have uttered 
those deathless phrases when England seemed fated 
for invasion by the Nazi hordes: 

"We shall not flag or fail. We shall fight in France, we 
sliall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with 
growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we 
shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we 
shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing 
grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we 
shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender." 

Despite the practical necessity to be re-elected, 
Churchill never compromised on his principles. His 
honesty and sense of personal integrity were of the 
highest order, the classical hallmark of his ultimate 
greatness. The world is not likely to see the likes of 
Winston Churchill again for many, many years. 

Somewhere, beyond The Bar, a ruddy-cheeked, 
rotund, cigar-studded old man with the heart of a lion 
and a will of steel is cheerfully giving a pudgy-fingered 
"V" sign to all those of the heavenly host who might 
need their spirits lifted just a bit. 

* PENNY-PINCHED SCHOOLS 

It is difficult to understand how so many other- 
wise sensible American taxpayers can be so com- 
pletely insensible and unreasonable when it comes to 
appropriating tax money for the construction of 
schools for their children. 

Each year thousands of local communities estab- 



lish budgets which form the bases for pegging the 
rates at which they tax themselves to provide com- 
munity services. Generally, from a half to two-thirds 
of this tax money goes for educational purposes. Of 
the educational funds, most is spent for salaries of 
teachers and administrative expenses. Very little is 
spent for construction. 

If we someway managed to obtain all our school- 
buildings for nothing it would make very little differ- 
ence in our local tax bills. The average new school- 
building program takes only from 10 to 20 cents 
from the school tax dollar. 

Assume that an average homeowner pays $200 in 
local taxes. Assume further that education takes 
half the local budget and it can be seen he is paying 
$100 for the school program. Now if new school 
construction takes 15 percent of the school tax dol- 
lar, the homeowner is paying $15 a year for school- 
building purposes. 

Many a parent who screams loud and long about 
that amount of school taxes will spend more than $15 
for a bicycle for his child! Looking at it another 
way: the cost of a modest TV set in the house which 
probably will interfere with school home work would 
pay his share of a schoolbuilding program for ten 
long years! 

There is a lot of talk about "educational frills" 
in school construction but figures reveal that, while 
the cost of all building has tripled in the past 20 
years, the cost of schoolbuilding has only doubled. 
And the better a school is built, the less it costs to 
maintain. Poor insulation, for example, can result 
in heating costs 75 percent higher than if good ma- 
terials were used . . . and for the life of the structure. 

A final thought: About $3 billion is earmarked for 
school construction this year. During the same time 
there will be $10.5 spent for alcohol. 

* IN TIMES OF DISASTER 



The International Red Cross is a worldwide federa- 
tion of scores of national Red Cross, Red Shield and 
Red Crescent (in the Arab nations) organizations 
which are ready to deliver assistance to those in need 
almost anywhere in the world. The American Red 
Cross is a recognized leader in this vital program. 
Let's keep it that way. Join the annual Red Cross 
Roll Call this month. Your help is needed. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



'Right-to-Work' Advocates Suffer Setbacks 



A few weeks ago the Indiana State 
Legislature repealed its "right-to-work" 
law just as fast as the new Democrati- 
cally-controlled body could do the job, 
thus reducing the number of "right-to- 
work" states from 20 to 19. 

Following close on the heels of this 
victory for organized labor, the New 
Mexico Senate rejected a "right-to- 
work" proposal by a vote of 18 to 14, 
and the New Mexico House turned 
thumbs down, as well. 

Hopefully, state action such as this 
will beat a path to the Halls of Con- 
gress where the proper steps will be 
taken to abolish Section 14(b) in the 
Taft-Hartley Act which makes state 
"right-to-work" laws possible. 

The 1964 Democratic platform 
stated: 

"The industrial democracy of free, 
private collective bargaining and the 
security of American trade unions must 
be strengthened by repealing Section 
14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act. The 
present inequitable restrictions of the 
right to organize and to strike and pick- 
et peaceably must also be eliminated." 

In President Johnson's 1965 'State 
of the Union' message, before the 89th 



Congress, he reiterated his support to 
repeal this anti-union law and in doing 
so "hoped to reduce conflicts that for 
several years have divided Americans 
in various States." 

In the July, 1964 issue of The Car- 
penter, President Hutcheson made 
note of the fact that the voter appor- 
tionment decision, handed down by the 
..Supreme Court last June, will have 
far-reaching implications for the work- 
ing people of the Nation. The Court, 
in effect, said that all members of state 
legislatures must be elected by roughly 
equal numbers of voters. 

This decision will have a direct ef- 
fect on curtailing the passage of right- 
to-work laws and other measures de- 
signed to hamstring unions. It has been 
the practice for rural citizens to have 
five to ten times as much representa- 
tion as city dwellers. As a result, this 
has kept rural elements in command 
of the legislatures. 

Due to voter apportionment, no 
longer will 20,000 voters in a rural 
area be entitled to one legislator while 
100,000 city dwellers also get only one. 
One study showed that, at present 70 
per cent of the American people live 



In Memory of AFL Founder 



^fs ^ i pwy 




USS SAMUEL GOMPERS — An artist's sketch of the destroyer tender which 
President Johnson has announced will be named the USS Samuel Gompers 
after one of the founders and first president of the American Federation of 
Labor. The first ship of its type built since 1945, the Gompers, designated 
AD-37, will be 644 feet long, have an 85-foot beam, and displace 20,500 
tons. It will carry a complement of 135 officers and 1,668 enlisted personnel. 
The tender is designed to accompany the fleet and to make repairs on destroy- 
ers, including nuclear power plants and missiles. (U. S. NAVY PHOTO.) 



in cities. Now they will get 70 per- 
cent of the representation in state 
legislatures. 

The bulk of union membership is 
located in cities; therefore, the will of 
the individual union member, as a re- 
sult of this decision, will greatly influ- 
ence the state laws. 

In short, the Supreme Court decision 
has removed the one big road-block to 
better state legislation. 

Two days before the Indiana Senate 
voted to repeal the eight-year-old law 
prohibiting union shop agreements, 
Governor Roger D. Branigin gave the 
repeal drive top priority in his legisla- 
tive address. 

He termed the "right-to-work" law 
a "sham," and added: 

"It has accomplished no purpose 
which is worth the rancor and contro- 
versy it has stirred among our citizens. 
I urge its immediate repeal." 

New Mexico's State Senator C. Fin- 
cher Neal led the floor fight against a 
"right-to-work" resolution, which was 
recently repealed. He told the Senate: 

"We are fighting a profit-motive out- 
fit from out of the state called the Na- 
tional Right to Work Committee, 
which was organized here to make a 
profit out of New Mexico. 

"This is a moral issue. My church 
is against this law. Your church is 
against this law and our churches are 
against it because they are trying to 
protect the welfare of our people." 

Senator Alfonso Montoya backed up 
Neal's opposition to the "Right-to- 
work" resolution with the assertion that 
"the issue here is whether we are going 
to have industrial peace in New Mexi- 
co or industrial chaos." 

He said: "The proponents of this 
resolution apparently do not under- 
stand how unions are organized and 
that the individual worker already has 
the freedom to join or not to join a 
union. Unions come into being and 
stay that way only when a majority of 
workers in a plant vote for a union to 
represent them with management. And 
I believe that the majority still rules 
in our country." 

Feelings and actions, such as those 
shown in Indiana and New Mexico, 
raise the hopes that state "Right-to- 
Work" laws, and eventually Section 
14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act, are on 
the road out. 

If your state still has a so-called 
"right-to-work" law, you and your lo- 
cal union should be working hard to 
get this law repealed. Become an act- 
ive participant in operation 'washout.' 



MARCH, 1965 



11 



SCRAP-PLYWOOD IDEAS 
PAY OFF FOR MEMBERS 




Many local unions in the United States and 
Canada represented in the scores of entries 
received. Your own ideas can be money 
winners, too! 



The American Plywood Association is 
paying $15 to carpenters for their ideas 
that show how to use scrap plywood on 
the job. The ideas must be explained in 
a paragraph or two and must include a 
readable sketch. On the opposite page 
are six money winners from the United 
Brotherhood, just reported to us. 

The idea-buying program started after 
engineers working on the National As- 
sociation of Home Builders time and 
motion study program in 1963 found 
workmen often spent as much time hunt- 
ing for tools as they did using them. 
The Plywood Association decided to seek 
good ideas that use scrap plywood. 

Ideas submitted to CARPENTER Maga- 
zine will be judged for interest and 
workability. The best ones will be worth 
$15 and will be published from time to 
time in these pages. 

Send ideas to American Plywood Asso- 
ciation, in care of CARPENTER Magazine, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, 
D. C. 20001. Include your return ad- 
dress, typed or clearly printed, your 
union number and a brief explanation 
and sketch of the idea. All ideas sub- 
mitted become the property of American 
Plywood Association. 

There is no limit to the number of ideas 
that can be submitted by one man. 



r 



SITE PLANS HOLDER. 



DRAV-WS-S SCLTEb 
j4" EDLTS AND WINS- NUTS 





THREE TIER TOOL 60X 



GO 



33, 



ELEYATIOM PETAIL A-A 

Drawings on a building site are often hard to locate and even harder to handle 
and keep clean. Here's a simple idea that eliminates the problem. First, cut 
plywood cleats for each drawing. Put the drawings in order and drill and 
bolt them together between cleats. Cleats should be made from Vz- or , 
%-inch plywood, 2 inches wide and about 6 inches longer than the A 
width of the drawings. Use 1/4-inch bolts and wing nuts to fasten 
cleats. Two side holders can be made from plywood and nailed 
to studs in the site office or fastened to a stand made 
from 2 x 2's. Once in the rack, the drawings are 
orderly and easy to handle. Idea submitted 
by L. W. Dutton, Toronto, Canada, 
Local #27. 



pieces of fcutBe*. 
base with Hi 

HOLtS TO LIFT 
THE TWO TOP 
OFF, 



K- SLOT 



TAPS- 



- SMALL 
Top TRAV 



This handy, three-tier tool box is especially useful for finish work. Each tray 
can be removed so all tools are easy to reach. The tool box is made with 
■A-inch plywood and is light in weight. Each tray is 2V2 inches deep. The 
bottom tray is nine inches wide and long enough for a 28-inch level. Each 
tray is %-inch shorter than the one below it. Corner supports are 
1 x l's. These should be nail-glued and be 1/2-inch shorter than the 
height of the tray to serve as a seat for the tray above. The 
handle is %-inch plywood and is fastened to the bottom 
tray. Upper trays are slotted to receive the handle. 
Finish with shellac or varnish. Idea submitted 
by Charles C. Bener, Patton, Pa., 
Local #1419. 



/+' <*. '/a" KWOOt) STAIR GUA&E 

LAY BACK AGAINST RISER AND AbJUST ENt> PIECES ' 
A&AINST SKIKT 6QARE>. T=LA.cE. oH TREAt> T° &e 
CUT AND MAP-K. 

SLOT size 

SAME AS-BCW- 




t-n 



WING- NUT- 1 
5TOV6 &OLT- 1 

This clever gauge will make it easy to cut treads for stairs to the exact 

width. It can be made from 'A- or %-inch plywood. To use the com- t 

pleted unit, simply lay it against the stair riser, adjust the end pieces 

for width against the skirt board and tighten the wing bolts. Place . 

the gauge on the tread to be cut and mark for width. The , 

gauge is especially handy for a curved stairway or one 

where the width of the stairway varies. Idea 

submitted by Charles E. Kuheim, Kansas 

City, Mo., Local #61. 



PLYWOOD CLAMP FOR &LUIN& DELf\MINAT£t> MOfe: 



f5t 



EO&C OF DOOIS. • 

j_ PROTECTION 

2- FCR. WlVOBR. 

IT 



- Wfrt<rE. 



• \V-W WED&E 



This clever little plywood clamp can be used to glue almost anything that's 

flat. Just notch a piece of Vz- or %-inch plywood a little wider than the 

pieces you're gluing. Place the notched part of the plywood clamp over 

the objects to be glued and use a small wedge to tighten the clamp. 



PLYWOOD RIP CrUlbE FOR SKJLLSWrY 



& 




• SKILLSAW ELADE 
■ SWLL5AW TABLE 



MILL ED&E 



A simple rip guide for use with a portable saw 
can be made with two pieces of plywood, glued 
and screwed (or nailed) together. Just about any 
thickness of plywood can be used, but the top 
piece must have one straight edge for the saw 
table to run against. Cut the bottom piece 
a little wider than needed and saw the ex- 
cess after assembly. Clamp or tack the rip 
guide to the piece being cut. Idea sub- 
mitted by C. R. Ackerman, Springfield, 
Mo., Local #710, by Mel Thomshaw, 
Redwood City, Calif., Local #1408 
and by J. M. Power, Boston, 

Mace I nral -H-Hf) 




Vt' SCRAP PLVWO00 
AMV KIND OF HINC-ts 
SASH CHAIN 




A couple of pieces of scrap plywood can be whipped into a handy saw- 
horse for any job in a matter of minutes. Simply cut two pieces as 
shown, attach hinges and a sash chain or wire on the lower part 
of each leg and you're in business. It's easily handled and 
stored out of the way and makes a good workbench or 
scaffold support. Idea submitted by Larry Wheeler, 
Freeport, Long Island, Local #950. 



LEVELING ON THE ISSUES 



The staggering concept re- 
garding any proposal intend- 
ing to provide health care 
for the elderly is the simple 
fact that, once begun, there 
is no turning back. When 
younger working people have 
contributed to such a plan 
for a number of years, sim- 
ple morality demands that 
the plan must be continued 
so they may obtain those 
benefits for which they have 
been building up a credit 
balance. 

Consequently, it is vital 
that whatever health plan, if 
any, is adopted, be the cor- 
rect one. It must be a plan 
which will give the most care 
to the most people for the 
least money, with equity and 
justice for all. 

Simply providing medical 
care for the elderly could be 
ridiculously simple. It could 
be done by providing medical 
services in veterans' and oth- 
er hospitals for whoever made 
application for them and allowing 
the service doctors and doctors under 
contract to the federal government to 
treat them. The government could 
build and operate nursing homes for 
the elderly sick, paying for their care 
from the general fund. 

But these measures would make 
federal wards of the elderly. They 
would be more-regimented in their 
last days than youngsters in the 
Army in their early days. So there 
must be a compromise; one which 
will provide for health care for the 
elderly and still allow relatively large 
areas of freedom of action by those 
receiving the medical assistance and 
those rendering such services. 

At the present time there is a so- 
called health care program function- 
ing in 40 states and in Guam, Puerto 
Rico, Virgin Islands and the District 
of Columbia. The Kerr-Mills pro- 
gram, a joint state-federal program, 
was adopted by a previous Congress, 




whatever is adopted must be correct 



but it never really "got going." 
Many of its proponents admit that, 
at the present time, it has inherent 
faults in it. But, they say, most 
programs do have "bugs" in them 
at first and, given a chance, the 
Kerr-Mills program could function 
perfectly after a proper "shake- 
down." What Kerr-Mills opponents 
object to is the fact that, in order to 
obtain benefits, the elderly person 
must undergo a financial scrutiny 
and virtually "take a pauper's oath" 
before being qualified for benefits. 
There are horrendous stories, pos- 
sibly true, possibly false, circulated 
such as the maze of the widow who 
needed medical care for a chronic 
condition but had to give away her 
little property before she could qual- 
ify for medical assistance. Had she 
sold it, the proceeds would not have 
been sufficient to keep her in medi- 
cal aid for more than a few years 
and her prognosis was for an ex- 
tended period of hospitalization. 



Others say that Kerr-Mills 
splits the responsibility for 
keeping costs down between 
the states and the federal gov- 
ernment to the extent that 
there is no real centralization 
of authority. The result, 
critics say, can often be wild- 
ly escalating costs. 

Eldercarc, a proposal only 
recently advanced by the 
American Medical .Associa- 
tion, is a compromise over 
the AMA's previous unyield- 
ing attitude toward medical 
care for the aged. It amounts 
to an amendment to the Kerr- 
Mills Bill at a national level to 
provide a much wider range of 
health benefits than Kerr- 
Mills would allow for Ameri- 
cans over 65 who need such 
help. It would utilize Blue 
Cross and Blue Shield plans 
and the plans of commercial 
insurance companies. In or- 
der to qualify, its proponents 
say, a person would have to 
make only a simple annual 
statement of income, quite similar to 
the statement required before one 
is allowed' to open a charge ac- 
count with a department store. 
There would be no "welfare de- 
partment" type of financial investi- 
gation. The wealthy elderly would 
not receive assistance. The moder- 
ately well-off would receive a lim- 
ited, sliding-scale amount of finan- 
cial assistance. The elderly person 
with little or no income would be 
completely taken care of insofar as 
health care is required. 

Eldercare proponents point out 
that, with this system, the taxpayers 
would pay only for medical aid to 
the elderly indigent, not to the 
wealthy aged who could just as 
easily pay their own way. They 
point out that, under the proposed 
Medicare plan, combined taxes for 
social security and medicare would 
climb to a maximum of $562 per 
Continued on page 23 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



ill 

The 




Craftsman 



He was a carpenter. With quiet skill 
He fashioned wood by measured, careful line; 
Planning each board to serve his craftsman's will, 
Releasing beauty from a chunk of pine. 

His shelves were fitted straight and tight and true; 
The strips he joined could never come apart. 
His cupboards taught perfection through and through, 
And in his gnarled old hands, tools learned new art. 

In simple kindliness he went his way, 

His blue eyes twinkling at some homely jest; 

Making new friends in each hard-working day, 

Then coming home to her whom he loved best, 

Until one day he opened wide the door 

To Death, a friend he had not met before. 



Hilda Worthington Smith 




HILDA WORTHINGTON SMITH was named dean of Bryn Mawr College in 1919, 
where she organized and directed the first summer school for women workers in the 
nation. In 1927, Miss Smith founded the American Labor Education Service and 
became its first director. She later conducted the nationwide WPA Workers' Educa- 
tion Service and established camps and schools for unemployed workers. Since 1952, 
she has been adviser on programs for the elderly to the states of New York and 
Connecticut and lately has worked with the Public Housing Administration and 
Vocational Rehabilitation Administration. Recently a group of her friends and 
admirers got together and privately published a collection of her poetry. "The 
Craftsman" is reprinted from this volume. 



MARCH, 1965 



15 



CmadiMt -QecliOit 



2V2 Billion Dollars 
In Housebuilding 

Prospects are for a continuation of 
the construction boom in Canada, par- 
ticularly in the field of housing. 

Housebuilding is a two and a half 
billion dollar business today. The fig- 
ure is expected to reach the three bil- 
lion dollar mark by 1970. 

Last year housing starts set a rec- 
ord with 165,658. breaking the previ- 
ous record set in 1958. 

The Economic Council of Canada 
has warned that Canada must provide 
a million and a half new jobs by 1970, 
due to population increase and new 
workers coming into the working force. 
Many of these jobs must come from 
construction and the demand in other 
industries created by new construction. 
Such industries as house furnishings, 
appliances. TV and radio, and land- 
scaping, are indirect beneficiaries of 
increased activity in the housing field. 

A cloud on the horizon is the lack 
of serviced land. Much more will 
have to be done by municipalities if 
enough serviced land is to be available 
to meet the 200,000 home target set 
for 1970. 

National Medicare 
Plan Being Discussed 

The pension and medicare pots are 
boiling merrily in Canada. The possi- 
bility of the enactment of a Canada 
Pension Plan by the federal govern- 
ment came closer when Ontario's Pre- 
mier Robarts pledged support to the 
principle of a federal portable pension 
scheme. At the same time he criticized 
specific items in the federal govern- 
ment's present CPP proposals, but said 
that his alternative proposals will not 



16 



be forced to the point of delaying the 
plan. 

But he did make some valid criti- 
cism, particularly that the benefits were 
too low in the early years. In any case 
since the province of Quebec has de- 
cided to develop its own pension plan, 
it was essential to the national plan 
that Canada's wealthiest and most 
populous province go along with it. 
Ontario is now committed. 

The trade union movement is hop- 
ing that the pension picture will be 
improved by the lowering from 70 to 




65 of the age at which the basic uni- 
versal old age pension of $75 is 
payable. 

On the subject of medicare, the shoe 
is on the other foot. Premier Robarts 
is bringing in some kind of Ontario 
medicare plan. This plan is likely to 
be along the lines of the Alberta plan 
and the recently-announced British 
Columbia plan. It is not a government- 
operated plan that covers everybody, 
regardless of income. It purports to 
cover the lowest income groups and 
indigents through government pay- 
ments to private insurance organiza- 
tions, then leaves the rest of the pop- 



ulation to be covered in the usual way 
by premium payments to private insur- 
ers. This means that low income, 
middle income and high income groups 
pay the same premiums. 

The invasion of provincial govern- 
ments into the medicare field makes it 
appear that a national plan is not 
now in sight. 

Nevertheless the trade union move- 
ment in Canada, in a drive sponsored 
by the Canadian Labor Congress, is 
campaigning vigorously for a national 
plan as recommended by the Royal 
Commission on Health Services last 
year. The campaign, with the slogan 
"A Health Charter for Canadians," is 
aimed at getting action on medicare 
now so that the national plan could 
come into full operation by July 1st, 
1967, in Canada's Centennial Year. 

Trade Bars Lifted 
On Autos and Parts 

The trade barriers between the 
United States and Canada were lifted 
another notch with the signing of an 
agreement between the two nations 
providing for a common market in 
automobiles and parts. 

The privilege of importing cars and 
parts into Canada duty-free will be 
restricted to automobile manufacturers. 
All others including individuals would 
still have to pay the 17VS percent duty 
plus other taxes. 

The trade unions most concerned 
with the agreement were generally in 
accord with its terms. In the long run, 
it should mean increased auto produc- 
tion in Canada, higher wages in the 
industry and lower prices. 

But some people are already worry- 
ing about the short-term effects. There 
is no guarantee in the plan that auto 

THE CARPENTER 



prices in Canada, now substantially 
higher than in the United States will 
come down for the benefit of the con- 
sumer. There is no assurance that 
auto wages will go up although this 
is of course subject to collective bar- 
gaining. Small manufacturers of auto 
parts fear that the net effect of the 
scheme will be that the auto companies 
will push them to the wall. 

Everyone agrees that the big auto 
companies have nothing to lose. The 
loss of federal government income on 
import duties due to the trade deal 
will amount to $50 million. The money 
will be a profit gain for the auto com- 
panies until their prices come down. 
In the meantime, they will be import- 
ing cheaper U. S. cars and parts and 
getting Canadian prices. 

But in the long run, the agreement 
should be beneficial. Barring a slump 
in the U. S., car production in Canada 
should go up, prices should come down 
and wages should get closer to the 
U. S. level. Only time will tell where 
and if the hoped for benefits will 
accrue. 

Department Status 
For Statistics Bureau 

Mitchell Sharp, Canadian Minister of 
Trade and Commerce, announced recent- 
ly that the Dominion Bureau of Statistics 
had been designated for legal and admin- 
istrative purposes as a department of the 
Federal Government. The change went 
into effect as a result of an Order-in- 
Council of January 6, which also desig- 
nated the Dominion Statistician as the 
Deputy Head for DBS. 

The present Dominion Statistician is 
Walter E. Duffett, who will continue to 
report to the Minister of Trade and Com- 
merce in accordance with the provisions 
of the Statistics Act. Mr. Duffett was ap- 
pointed on January 1, 1957, after serving 
the Government in various capacities, in- 
cluding positions in the Bank of Canada, 
the Department of Labour and the War- 
time Prices and Trade Board. He is a 
member of the International Statistics 
Institute, the Inter-American Statistical 
Institute and the American Statistical As- 
sociation. 

The designation of DBS as a depart- 
ment is in line with the views of the Glas- 
sco Commission. 

Canada has a central statistical system 
of which DBS is the main element. The 
information produced by the Bureau is 
widely used by the federal, provincial 
and municipal governments, by labor 
business and industry, and by institutions 
and associations of all kinds. 

Mr. Sharp noted that the position of 
Dominion Statistician had been created 
half a century earlier, in 1915. The 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics came into 
being three years later under the Statistics 
Act of 1918. 




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Name_ 



-Age_ 



Address- 
City 



-Zone State_ 



Occupation. 



MARCH, 1965 



17 



New York 

Bank Displays 

Millwrights' Skills 




Closeup of one of 12 teller stations 
finished in cherry. Bank also fea- 
tures two modern drive-in windows. 



As the great 18th century English 
satirist Jonathan Swift put it, "a car- 
penter's known by his chips." This 
more than holds true for the skilled 
craftsmen of Buffalo Local 1401 
who carved and chipped and chis- 
eled some lengths of cherry into 
most distinctive woodwork for the 
recently dedicated Liberty National 
Bank and Trust Company in Or- 
chard Park, N. Y., a suburb of 
Buffalo. 

Complementing the Colonial 
styled exterior of the building is the 
bank's interior which features raised 
panel wainscoting, a nine piece cor- 
nice incorporating a dental mould- 
ing, a curved bank rail, and intricate 
mantel and interior vestibule doors. 
Exterior trim consists of an elab- 
orately carved front entrance, col- 
umns, cornice rail, cupola and cor- 
nice, all fabricated in the D. C. 
Bruner Co., Inc. mill of Buffalo. 



j^V 




if! 

■ > L ^.,- - III! 


• - Eii 
■ 


1 i 



Exterior of new hank with glistening white pillars accents Early American design. 
Front entrance, pillars, cornice work were turned hy Buffalo Local 1401 millmcn. 




Massive cherry table in center of bank lobby supplies writing space for six customers. 
Bank will celebrate its 50th anniversary next year, having been founded in 1916. 




A measure of traditional Eastern hospitality was built into bank 
with this warm and friendly customer lounge. Note the cherry 
paneling above the fireplace and also running along the ceiling. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 





M«M* 



?ooo 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 



SONG WRITER — Michael Castagnoli of 
Local 188, Yonkers, New York, has 
launched a song-writing career. His first 
song entitled 
"Don't Cry Little 
Girl," published by 
the Winslow Music 
Company of New 
York City, a mem- 
ber of ASCAP, has 
been recorded and 
is now being heard 
over many radio 
stations throughout 
the United States. 
It bears a Ronnie 
Castagnoli label. 

100TH BIRTHDAY was recently cele- 
brated by Brother Martin Middleton of 
Local 52, Charleston, South Carolina. 

For nearly four hours, Brother Middle- 
ton received well-wishers at a party given 
for him. The evening was highlighted by 
a birthday greeting from President Lyn- 
don B. Johnson, of which Capt. Middle- 
ton (as he is called by his friends) said: 
"I think it's wonderful that he would 
consider me. I don't know what I can do 
to thank him." 





"Captain" Martin Middleton 

Middleton said his family fled Charles- 
ton during the latter stage of the Civil 
War and went to Chester, where he was 
born. 

Asked the secret to his longevity, he 
said: "Self-denial and association with 
people of your own proclivities." 




BOWLING TROPHY of the Metropolitan District Carpenters Bowling League of 
Philadelphia, Pa., has been won by Local 1050 of Philadelphia. The O. William 
Blaier revolving trophy was presented Local 1050 for defeating Local 1906, a 
millwrights local. The championship team included, from left, Nick Gaeta, Pat 
Molinaro, Hoe Iezzi, Sam Picariello (team captain), Louis Ettore and George 
Cherneky. Those team members not present for photo were Joe Oppolito and 
Walt D'Ambrogjo. 





No.516 16-oz. 
nail hammer 



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in 7, 13 and 20-oz. nail hammers 

and 18-oz. ripper. 

* Manufacturer's suggested retail price. 

Available throughout 

the United States and Canada. 



Ejj I RUE I EM PER 



MARCH, 1965 



19 





By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Brother Coetz at 0216 S.W. Iowa Street, Portland, Ore. 



Doing a bit of research on spin fishing, 
newest form of angling in America, I 
note in several books published in 
England: 

In England, where spin fishing as we 
know it got its start, this light tackle 
method is referred to as "threadline 
angling." 

"Casting." as we understand it in 
America, with comparatively short rod 
and level wind reel, is referred to in 
England as "spinning." 

The French, also pioneers in light-line 
angling, refer to spinning as "lancer 
legar," which means "light casting." 

Why the term "spin fishing" has been 
adopted in this country is a mystery to 
me. The line does not spin; it coils off 
the reel spool which is stationary during 
the cast. The spool, during the line- 
retrieving operation, does not spin; it 
moves in and out in oscillating fashion. 

A reel, I mean a real, mixed up situa- 
tion, huh? 

Boating Tips 

Don't throw away that old dust pan. 
It'll make a mighty good bailer for your 
boat. 

If your boat must be anchored or tied 
where it is exposed to rough water, put 
a common screen-door spring between a 
half loop in the mooring chain. It acts 
as a shock absorber, and the boat will 
ride the storm better. 

Coon-Dog Man 

Business Representative Juan Paul 
Johnes of Carpenter's Local 101, Balti- 
more, Maryland, is an avid "coon dog" 
man. Here's a photo of Juan with his 
son Jerome and daughter Judy, showing 
two of the twelve registered treeing 
Walker Coon Hounds they own.. Says 
Brother Johnes: 

"Give me a call fellows; bring your 
dogs and we will see what we can do 
in those swamps of Maryland." 

We're advised than Juan has pups for 
sale from time to time. 



Brother Johnes and Walkers 

Gold Button Winner 

Charles E. Smale of Wilmington, Cali- 
fornia, a member of the Pile Drivers, 
Dock Carpenters and Deep Sea Divers 
Union, Local 2375, recently retired after 
28 years of service and recounts a re- 
cent experience as the most thrilling of 
his life in the outdoors. 

Charles and his wife, Iona, were troll- 
ing in the saltchuck off the mouth of the 
Smith River in northern California, about 




three miles from the Oregon border, in 
company with Guide Marvin L. "Sonny" 
Smith. 

Suddenly Charles' rod tip went plung- 
ing down like a jet on a dive. He figured 
he was fast to the lunker of his life — 
and he was, 61'/i pound Chinook that 
measured 45 inches from nose to tail and 
33 inches around the middle. Here's a 
pic of Charles with his finny prize and 
that, brothers, is the largest salmon to 
appear in these columns. He used a spin- 
ner to lure the monster which has been 
mounted and will be displayed at the 
San Francisco Sportsman's Show this 
year. 

His catch earned his a golden button 
from the famous Smith River "Chinook 
Salmon Club" (it was the largest salmon 
ever taken from this area) and a jewelled 
trophy pin from The Ship Ashore Resort 
at Smith River. 

Snow-Time Tip 

How many times during a hunting or 
fishing trip have you been stuck in the 
snow, ice or mud? Next time take along 
a couple of asphalt shingles and throw 
them in the trunk. Put them rough side 
down in front of the wheels and along 
the slippery ruts. You'll be surprised how 
well they work. 

Protecting Doe 

A favorite hiding place for the doe to 
place her newly-born fawn is alongside 
a stump or log in an open glade. The 
infant wildling gives off practically no 




Charles Smale and prize-winning Chinook 



odor which is protective device pro- 
vided by Mother Nature against wild 
predators. 

If you come upon a fawn in the woods, 
do not worry about it being lost or 
abandoned. It's mother may have left 
for a short time between feedings but 
usually she's not too far away. 

The belief that a doe will abandon 
her fawn if it has been touched by human 
hands is a fallacy. The mother instinct 
is stronger than the doe's fear of man. 
I have witnessed a mother return to her 
fawn in less than a half hour after the 
fawn was tagged by a game commission 
field agent. 

Fawns, although very cute and playful 
are, nevertheless, wild animals and as such 
make poor playmates. Petulant deer pets 
have been known to inflict serious injury 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



on children. Human mothers make poor 
substitutes. Leave the fawns in the 
woods. 

Odds and Ends 

Loose sends from that outdoor lovin' 
brotherhood: 

• Vern B. Yaple of Sequim, Wash- 
ington, a member of Local 1303, Port 
Angeles for 27 years has been raising a 
ruckus about the indiscriminate shooting 
of doe and leaving them to die then 
fester in the woods. We agree, Vern, it's 
a dastardly act and like the remark made 
by Brother Feeley of New York some- 
time ago, "Guys who do things like that 
don't have a heart. All they got is a 
'thumping gizzard.' " 

• Homer Pugh of Trop, Michigan, a 
member of Local 998, favors the Davison 
Lake area out of Lakewood, Michigan. 
It was during last year's waterfowl open- 
ing that he bagged a nice pair of mal- 
lards. Homer's been a member of Local 
998 for 18 years and likes to pass away 
that spare time in the winter with a 
little scattergunnin'. 

• Charles Froehlich, Sr., a member of 
Local 1483, Patchogue, Long Island, and 
the Missus, past 70, enjoy their favorite 
pastime whenever they get a chance: 
"Fishing." On a recent junket, Mrs. 
Froehlich nipped three lunker trout, larg- 
est of which nearly tipped the scales 
at three pounds. 

• Roy Golden of Pilot Rock, Oregon, 
a member of Local 2970, and his son, 
Rickey, age 11, travel 70 odd miles from 
home to fish the Columbia river near 
Boardman. A recent catch made the trip 
particlarly worthwhile. They came back 
with three sturgeon: one over 56 inches, 
the largest, weighing 27 pounds, dressed. 

• Orsen Janes of Sacramento, Cali- 
fornia, a member of Local 1618 in Sac- 
ramento and Don Janes,' a member of 
Local 1147, Roseville, California, and 
his wife, recommend the Sutter Bypass 
near Sacramento as a top shooting area 
for ducks. 

More Odds and Ends 

News from that rod-and-reel loving 
membership: 

• Ed Leader, Sr., of Medford, Wis- 
consin, a member of Local 1025, and his 
wife are ardent pike and walleye fans, 
and recommend the northern sector of 
Wisconsin, near and around the Willow 
flowage, as top fishing waters. 

• James J. Doran of Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, a member of Local 1181, has 
a piscatorial score to settle with his son 
Mark in the Black Hills of South Dakota. 
It was there, last vacation time, that 
Mark skunked dad on the rainbow trout 
fishing. 

• Mike Mousel, whose dad is a 
member of Local 363, Elgin, Illinois, 
owes his love of the angling pastime to 
his parents and a big carp. Mike recalls 
that his first fish was a lunker carp that 
his folks, unbeknownst to him, had at- 
tached to his line. He got the true picture 
six years after the catch. 





with this 



Tests show that square Sheffield 
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tendency to split wood than equiv- 
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There's good reason. These square 
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Reduced splitting is just one of 
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M 



unique square design. For samples 
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mail the coupon. Armco Steel Cor- 
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Kansas City, Missouri 64125 

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"- V 



MARCH, 1965 



21 




They Get Stranded! 

Long hair may make men look in- 
telligent. But when found on their 
coats it makes them look foolish. 

— Wilfred Beaver 
Chicago, III. 






Bl v 



No Fish Story! 

A couple of loggers had been out 
fishing on their day off. It was dark 
as they rowed toward home. They 
passed close by a couple in another 
boat. 

"Any luck?" asked one of the 
loggers. 

"No" gloomily replied a man from 
the dusk. 

"What kind of bait were you us- 
ing?" asked the logger. There was a 
silence before the reply came: "I 
wasn't fishing!" 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 




Very Windy Texan 

Touring Texas, a visitor heard a 
radio report of possible tornadoes in 
a nearby state. 

"Is there any chance of getting a 
tornado here?" he asked. 

"Heck, no!" replied a Texas Type. 
"The winds we git hyar jist natcherlly 
tear tornadoes to pieces!" 

PATRONIZE UNION RETAIL STORES 

Daffy-Nitions 

Revised axiom: A fool and his mon- 
ey are soon popular. 

True confessions author: One who 
tries to write every wrong. 

Flag-waving speech: Star-spangled 
banter. 

Practical nurse: One who marries a 
rich old patient. 

Liquor store: Stupormarket. 

Sun bathing: A fry in the ointment. 



Mr. Pert Sez: 

It don't make no nevermind how in- 
nocent y'are, it still ain't smart to be 
seen goin' away from a burnin' barn 
with a kerosene can in your hand! 

BE SURE IT'S UNION 

Telephone Story 

A Frenchman, taken ill on a visit to 
this country, went to a hospital, fell in 
love with one of the telephone opera- 
tors, and married her after his release. 
Taking his bride home with him, he 
was at a loss to explain to his friends 
what her work in America had been. 
Translated, it came out this way: 
"When I met her, my wife was a call 
girl at the hospital." 

R LI A UNION BOOSTER? 

And Puffed Up? 

Some people are like blisters. They 

don't show up until the job is finished. 

— Clara Trester, Center Point, Ind. 

USE UNION-MADE TOOLS 

Happy Marriage 

A chiropodist in our town married 
his favorite manicurist. Now they are 
waiting on each other hand and foot. 

YOU ARE THE "U" IN UNION 

Satisfied Sonny 

After refusing to speak for the first 
four years of his life, the baby uttered 
his first words: "Mom," he said, "the 
toast is burnt." 

His amazed mother shrieked with 
joy, "Junior, you spoke! How come 
you've never talked before?" 

"Well," replied, "up to now every- 
thing's always been O.K." 



This Month's Limerick 

A gent with a monstrous moustache 

Chewed some hair out while gulping 

his hash. 

His phrases profane 

That he shrieked out in pain 

We shall represent here with a 



A Deadly Situation 

There's a guy in our local who's so 
henpecked that he had to ask his wife 
for permission to commit suicide! 

— Carl Wallman, 

Monmouth Junction, N. J. 

IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH 

No Mistake.' 

Coroner: Why do you , want to 
change the certificate, doctor?" 

Doctor: "I signed my name in the 
space marked 'Cause of death'!" 
— H. H., 
LU. 2155 



TAKE PART IN UN Id 



AFFAIRS 




Roundabout Answer? 

The Eskimo mother was reading to 
her small son: "Little Jack Horner sat 
in a corner ..." "Mama," broke 
in the tyke, "what's a corner?" 



R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE? 

He's All Alone Now! 

The psychiatrist was examining a 
patient. After listening awhile, he 
drew a mark on a chart like this: I. 
"What is that?" he asked. "A naked 
woman standing up" replied the pa- 
tient. Then he drew a mark like this: 
-. "What's that?" he asked. "An- 
other naked woman lying down" re- 
plied the patient. Finally the head- 
shrinker drew a line like this: L, which 
the patient described as "A naked 
woman sitting down." Finally the doc- 
tor told the patient that his problem 
simply was an oversexed mind. 

The patient indignantly replied: 

"Me? Heck, Doc, you're the one who's 

been drawing all the dirty pictures!" 

— Ben Morrell, Vancouver, Wash. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



Leveling on the Issues 

Continued from page 14 

year ... 10 percent of the income 
of any young employed person in 
the $5,600-per-year bracket. The 
$5,600-a-year worker would pay the 
same amount as a $56,000-a-year 
executive. Of course, the contribu- 
tion of the employer to the funds 
is also included in the $562 figure. 
Whether anyone would ever recover 
any of that contribution, should it 
be suddenly terminated, is anybody's 
guess. The employer probably would 
keep it. 

Opponents of Medicare thus call 
it "violently regressive" and point 
out that it would place a big load 
on the young and the low-wage peo- 
ple and that the health program 
would start out $35 billion in the 
red . . . the amount it will cost to 
provide health services for the 18 
million older beneficiaries who 
would begin to receive benefits im- 
mediately although they have not 
made any contribution. 

The proponents of Medicare insist 
that any such program must be made 
universally applicable; that no one 
can be excluded from participation 
in such a program since it would 
be financed by a universal tax. They 
declare that opposition to the Medi- 
care proposal has come only from 
a narrow segment of the entire popu- 
lation . . . doctors, and not all of 
them at that. 

Medicare proponents say, in reply 
to the criticism that it does not pro- 
vide full care, that it is not the 



February Contributions, 
Kennedy-Roosevelt Fund 

L.U. 10, Chicago, 111 $ 24.15 

L.U. 13, Chicago, HI 43.75 

L.U. 105, Cleveland, Ohio . . 25.00 

L.U. 137, Norwich, Conn. . . 10.06 

L.U. 155, Plainfield, N. J. . . 10.00 

L.U. 180, Vallejo, Calif. . . . 23.00 

L.U. 801, Woonsocket, R. I. 5.00 

L.U. 1180, Cleveland, Ohio 75.00 

L.U. 1319, Albuquerque, . 

N.M 20.75 

L.U. 1888, New York, N. Y. 47.50 

Total for February $ 284.21 

Previous contributions 126,026.31 

Grand Total $126,310.52 



intention of its backers to provide 
full care, but to provide assistance 
for the elderly who, while not wel- 
fare cases, are unable to finance 
fully the hospital and nursing home 
care they need. As presently 
planned, the program would be fi- 
nanced through a separate Hospital 
Insurance Trust Fund of the Treas- 
ury Department. Contributions 
would be made to the fund in 
amounts of .3 of one percent of 
earnings beginning in 1966, increas- 
ing to .45 percent of one percent 
in 1969 and thereafter, with a maxi- 
mum wage base of $5,600. The 
maximum annual contribution would 
be $25.20 from the wage earner 
and a like amount from his em- 
ployer. Benefits would include 60 
days at a time of both inpatient 
hospital care and post-hospital ex- 
tended care, home health services 
up to 240 visits a year and out- 
patient hospital diagnostic services 
with small portions to be paid by 
the patient. 

The air has been clouded by 
charges and countercharges and sta- 
tistics have been made to jump 
through hoops by spokesmen on 
both sides. One proponent of Medi- 
care declared that more than half 
the people over 65 have annual in- 
comes of less than $1,000. Then an 
opponent of Medicare retorts that 
the income figure was derived by 
the statistical trick of averaging in 
the zero incomes of wives and un- 
employable dependents over 65. 

Right now, for better or worse, 
it appears that Medicare, S. 1, with 
the blessing of President Johnson, 
is going to become law. Eldercare 
might have received more attention, 
might even have received the nod 
from Congress, if it had come along 
sooner. As a Johnny-come-lately, 
virtually a concession from the 
American Medical Association after 
the politically-minded doctors "saw 
the handwriting on the wall," Elder- 
care has a serious handicap. 

We should have the answer within 
a few weeks or months. Then his- 
tory will declare whether we have 
turned another corner toward travel- 
ing the road to "The Great Society" 
or whether our society has only 
taken an infant step toward a decent 
medical plan for those whose work- 
ing years are behind them. 



Appalachia 



Continued from page 4 

contributing to the regional depres- 
sion, the experts think there is an 
excellent possibility for an expanding 
market. Much of this hope is tied to 
the population explosion — continu- 
ally generating need for more wood — 
and technological breakthroughs which 
are expected to show the way for 
new uses for hardwoods. 

Water use studies would concen- 
trate on speeding up the program 
already underway by the Army Corps 
of Engineers, the U.S. Geological 
Survey and the Department of Agri- 
culture. The basic job is to set a 
master plan for flood and pollution 
control. 

Appalachia is rich in natural re- 
sources which can provide the basis 
for recovery. But the most important 
resource of all is its people. To help 
them to full stature, years of isola- 
tion and educational inadequacies 
must be remedied. 

To do this, a broad program of 
training and education is needed. 
Some assistance for basic educational 
needs will be provided by the school 
aid measures which are now under 
consideration in Congress, if they pass. 
This seems likely. Additional help will 
be necessary in training and voca- 
tional education, and the President's 
legislative program for Appalachia 
provides this. Among other things, 
new school facilities must be built to 
bring education closer to many people 
of Appalachia, and to provide better 
facilities for those who already are 
able to attend school on a regular 
basis. 

Before many Appalachia vocational 
trainees can be taught new skills, 
they must be taught to read and 
write. The region has a high incidence 
of illiteracy. 

Appalachian aid seems finally on 
the way — aimed at the region's mil- 
lions of people. If there were still 
uninhabited wilderness down the east 
coast's remote mountain ridge, there 
would be no need to be concerned. 
The fact that people are there — 17 
million of them — living in poverty, 
demands instant attention, not only 
for their own sake, but for the good 
of the nation. "Their pooled personal 
hopes, talents and resourcefulness," 
noted the Appalachian Commission 
report, "is a reservoir of creative en- 
ergy the nation can no longer afford 
to ignore." 



MARCH, 1965 



23 



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Return of the Square Nail 

The Armco Steel Corporation has apparently found 
out why. in Colonial days, the settlers invented the square 
nail. It holds better and causes less wood splitting than 
a round nail. It's just that simple, the manufacturer states. 

According to the Research Institute Laboratory of the 
National Association of Home Builders, Armco's newly 
developed square nail has approximately 50 per cent 
greater holding power and less tendency to split wood 
than comparable round wire nails. 

The NAHB laboratory compared the withdrawal re- 
sistance, lateral load capacity and splitting resistance of 
Armco's Scotch brand square nails and equivalent-sized 
common wire nails. 

In the first test — withdrawal resistance, the results in- 
dicated the Armco Square nails do not decrease in with- 
drawal resistance with a decrease in moisture content 
of the wood, while the round wire nail exhibits a marked 
decrease in withdrawal resistance. Also, the Scotch nail 
can be advantageous if alterations are to be made. 

Twenty 2x4 tension joints with solid wood splice plates 
were made for the lateral resistance tests. The joints 
were tested in tension in a Universal Testing Machine 
using a suitable loading arrangement with universal joints 
at both ends. The rate of loading was 500 lbs, per min- 
ute to failure. Load-slip data were observed and recorded 
for each joint up to points well beyond the elastic limits 
of the individual specimens. 

The results showed that, on the average, the Scotch 
nail's lateral holding power to be almost 50 per cent 
greater than the round wire nail's immediately after 
driving. After 30 days, the Scotch nail's advantage in- 
creased beyond 50 per cent. The laboratory report noted 
that the extreme splitting of the cover plates by the round 
wire nails severely reduced the joint's load-carrying 
capacities. 

The comparative splitting characteristics were observed 
on specimens made with 8d and 16d common and on 
specimens using 8d and 4d finish nails. The report deter- 
mined that Scotch nails in the "8d and 16d common offer 
"considerably greater splitting resistance" than equivalent 
sized round wire nails. The difference is not as large in the 
finish nail sizes, but the Scotch nails apparently offer 
greater resistance to splitting in this area also, the NAHB 
said. 

The report noted that square nails, because of a smaller 
cross section area, permit a more elastic joint than the 
round wire nails and this alone might diminish its lateral 
load capacity. But, the report pointed out, two other 
factors more than compensated for the smaller cross 
section area: (1) the square nail's serrations give it a 
greater delayed withdrawal resistance, and the nail ex- 
hibiting the greater withdrawal resistance should give 
the higher ultimate load in lateral resistance since this 
property is primarily a function of withdrawal resist- 
ance; (2) the square Scotch nails' resistance to splitting 
proves more square nails are actually holding, assuming 
an equal number of round wire samples are used. Al- 
though the square nails were found to be slightly more 
likely to bend than round wire nails, they are much 
easier to drive, the Research Report also noted. 

The square nail is made and marketed by Armco's 
Kansas City (Mo.) Works. It is available in most sizes 
and types. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 




Babylon, Long Island, Local 
Happily Burns Its Mortgage 



BABYLON, N. Y.— On Novem- 
ber 13, 1964, at a dinner-dance held 
to commemorate the event, Local 
Union 1837, Babylon, N. Y., hap- 
pily and officially unburdened itself 
from the mortgage on its office build- 
ing. 

The LaGrange Inn, scene of this 
milestone in the local union's his- 
tory, was filled to capacity with local 



union members, their wives, and 
many Long Island dignitaries. The 
ceremonies were highlighted by an 
inspiring message from General Sec- 
retary Richard E. Livingston. 

An excellent dinner was followed 
by dancing until the "wee hours." 
Everyone departed reluctantly but 
satisfied that this event marked the 
completion of a job well done. 



AT LEFT: General Secretary Livingston lights the flame that "extinguishes" Local 
1837's mortgage. From left, in the picture: President Peter Cavanaugh, General 
Representative John S. Rogers (a member of L.U. 1837), and General Secretary 
Livingston. 






Seated on the dais, left to right, above and below, L.U. 1837 Recording Secretary Richard McCloskey, Father McGlynn, 
Business Representative Chauncey Bartow, Suffolk County District Council, Secretary-Treasurer George Babcock, General Repre- 
sentative George Welsch, L.U. 1837, President Peter Cavanaugh, Master of Ceremonies General Representative James S. Rogers. 
BELOW, General Secretary Richard E. Livingston, Suffolk County Labor Commissioner Lou V. Tempera, Honorable Albert F. 
Koifler, Nassau District Council Business Representative John Rosenstrom, District Attorney Pat Canning, L.U. 1837 Financial 
Secretary Charles Ohlmiller. 




MARCH, 1965 



25 



1,350 Years of Service Rewarded at Pittsfield 

" :1 ' ' ; > •' IBS & 





PITTSFIELD, MASS. — At the annual Testimonial Dinner of Local 444 of Pittsfield, 25, 35, 45, 50, and 60-year pins were 
given to several members. Combined years of service in the union totaled more than 1,350, with several 60-ycar pins being given. 
Shown above, (along with their years of service) are: 

Standing, left to right, Edwin Pratt (53), John Hanson (30), Arminio Zuzzo (26), Augustus Dc Carlo (25), Paul Roberts (25), 
Kenneth Hanson (30), Augustus Schnopp (27), Richard Hynes (25), Richard Sweeney (28), Harold Tryon (25), William Root 
(30), Trever Hurst (28), and Joseph Contenta (26). 

Seated, Augustus Contenta (27), Charles Mougin (28), Andrew Senger (28), Eli Felton (44), Jacob Fitting (50), John Gard- 
ner (58), Gurino Bozzoli (54), Maurice Howes (40), Merton Daniels (29), and Carsten I. nude (42). 

Absent from the picture are William Reynolds (60), Anthony Grotti (52), Milton Farrington (51), Albert LaCroix (48), 
Rudolph Zaske (48), George Legarce (47), Harold Markham (45), John Ballardini (42), Clarence Regnier (38), Malcolm Fair- 
man (29), Vincent Olson (29), George Galusha (29), Rosario Beauchemin (28), William Wellar (25), Tliure Larson (25). 



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64 Honored in '64 
By Local Union 1408 

REDWOOD CITY, Calif. Local 1408 
of Redwood City held its Old Timers' 
Dinner last October, at which time 64 
members received their 25-year pins. 
General Representatives James Curry and 
Charles Nichols presented the pins. The 
records of Local 1408 show that 110 
members have been in the Brotherhood 
over 25 years, and five have over 50 years 
seniority. 



' :-' \ . '"\ vr; ^ 




ATTENDING the dinner of Local 
1408 were, left to right, Jack Weare, Sr., 
business representative; Carl Hofinger, 
59-year member; Ed Allen, 57-year mem- 
ber; and Brother Chester R. Bartalini, 
executive secretary of San Francisco Bay 
Counties District Council of Carpenters. 




THIS SPACE CONTRIBUTED BY THE PUBLISHER 




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are rats. 

They could help save your life 
through research — in the labora- 
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Last year the American 
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Send your check to "Can- 
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Always Shop for the Union Label — Your Sign of Quality 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



76,000 See Wood-Promotion Booth 
At Exposition in Portland, Oregon 




Shown at the wood-promotion booth displayed at the Pacific International Livestock 
Exposition are, from left: Brother O. O. Siler of Local 583, Portland; Lyle J. Hiller, 
General Executive Board member; Julius Viancour, assistant secretary of the Western 
Council of Lumber and Sawmill Workers; and E. B. Weber, executive secretary- 
treasurer of the Portland District Council. 



PORTLAND, ORE.— At the recent Pacif- 
ic International Livestock Exposition 
held in Portland, Oregon, a wood-promo- 
tion booth was jointly sponsored by the 
United Brotherhood, the Western Coun- 
cil of Lumber and Sawmill Workers and 
the Portland District Council of Carpen- 
ters. The display received numerous 
favorable comments from the record- 
breaking paid attendance crowd of 
76,000. 

Brother Lyle J. Hiller, 7th District 
General Executive Board member repre- 
sented the Brotherhood in this successful 



project. However, it was through the 
joint efforts of labor and management 
that this success was achieved. Besides 
the sponsors and members of the Brother- 
hood, there were many participants who 
donated materials, equipment and time. 
They were the following: Nicolai Door 
Manufacturing Company, Georgia Pacif- 
ic Corporation. Kalt Manufacturing 
Company, Timber Structures, Charles 
Grant Cabinets, Western Wood Products 
Association, Willy Grawe and Austin 
Haughey, Label Display Director Oregon 
AFL-CIO. 



Expansion Plans in East St. Louis to Bring Jobs 




EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL. — A $140-million expansion program for Granite City Steel 
Company in East St. Louis, extending over three years, was announced recently, and 
the Southern Illinois Building and Construction Trades Unions have worked out plans 
for work on the project. Above, John R. Hundley, the firm's vice president of indus- 
trial relations, outlines plans to Gene Clayton, president of the Building and Con- 
struction Trades Council. (Illinois Labor Tribune Photo). 



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MARCH, 1965 



27 





Star-spangled money saver 



» 






Used properly, this red, 
white and blue writing 
"tool" can take care of your 
money-saving problems in a 
single stroke. 

You just grasp it firmly 
and put your John Hancock 
on an application for the 
Payroll Savings Plan where you work. 
(Note small picture.) 

This authorizes your employer to make 
your savings automatic. He sets aside a 
small amount from your check each pay- 
day toward the purchase of United States 
Savings Bonds. 




The amount can be any size. The im- 
portant thing is it's saved regularly. 

Don't worry if you have to use an or- 
dinary pen instead of a star-spangled one. 
You'll get a nice star-spangled feeling to 
make up for it. 



Quick facts about Series E Savings Bonds 

V You get back $4 for every $3 at maturity 

V You can get your money when you need it 

V You pay no state or local income tax on the interest 
and can defer federal tax until you cash the Bond. 

V Your Bonds are replaced free if lost, destroyed or 
stolen 

Buy E Bonds for growth — H Bonds for current income 

Buy U.S. Savings Bonds 

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S^5^* service in cooperation with the Treasury Department and The Advertising Council. 



Los Angeles Local 
Honors Veterans 
Of 2 Generations 

LOS ANGELES. CALIF.— Five 50-year 
members and 117 25-year members were 
applauded and awarded pins at a meeting 
of Local Union 1052, December 16. 
Among the honorees was a father Rubin 
N. Kvitky, and his son, Alex, and an uncle 
Carl Berggren, and his nephew, Fred 
Schubert. 

Eighth District Board Member Patrick 
Hogan presented the pins. 




FATHER AND SON were honored in a 
brief ceremony, as General Board Mem- 
ber Patrick Hogan, center, presented pins 
lo Rubin Kvitky and his son, Alex. 




THE HONOREES, above and below, (not listed in left to right order, however, in- 
cluded: 

50-year members — Louis Appel, Theodore Berman, Benjamin Nidetz, Nathan 
Smookler, and Morris Wax; 

25-year members — Axel Anderson, Knute Anderson, Odell Anfinson, Edwin Arvid- 
son, Delbert H. Asher, Clyde G. Barmore, Willard Wm. Bell, Carl H. Berggren, R. 
Archie Black, John R. Claschke, C. J. Bos, John D. Botsford, R. L. Brookbank, 
Thomas S. Brown, Charles M. Bunch, Werner Carlson, Glenn I. Casler, Frederick W. 
Chappell, John Clauson, Louis Cohen, C. E. Coif, Joe W. Collins, George W. Craw- 
ford, Bertalon Csiky, Jean C. Danjou, John De La Vaux, Charles K. Dice, Edward 
W. Ehlers, Fred Falk, I. L. Faulhaber, Paul Fava, Raymond Filosa, Harry G. Finkel, 
Thomas H. Fletcher, Charles J. Fostler, Harry Freeman, Alic Friedman, Jean I. Gal- 
lant, Harry J. Goode, Joseph A. Gray, John T. Green, Daniel Halpert, James E. Ham- 
ilton, Sixton Hammarstrom, Allen E. Haren, Neal E. Harlow, O. J. Harryman, Samuel 
C. Hathorn, C. A. Hayward, Olof Hedlund, John A. Keikkila, Helmer Helberg, Walter 
E. Henry, Ed. H. Hoffman, Leonard L. Hoffman, Henry L. Holt, William E. Hosea, 
Clarence R. Howard, Edmund F. Joeb. Edward Johnson, Edward Johnson, Melville R. 
Jones, Mike Keegan, Maurice E. Keys, Niels Kirk, Joseph F. Knapp, Carl Kupersmith, 
Alex Kvitky, Rubin N. Kvitky, W. H. Labhart, John Lautenschlager, Pete Lealy, 
Adolph Lindell, Russell L. Lindenbaum, John Lormans, Joseph Lynch, Clarence C. 
Mares, Charles K. Marks, Robert H. Miller, Solomon Mintz, Elmer C. Morris, C. W. 
Moyan, Joseph D. Murphy, Russell E. Nelson, Ernest Nicholson, William R. Parr, 
Clyde E. Peairs, Charles L. Pelham, Fred K. Post, Frank Powell, Leroy Reynerston, 
John C. Ringer, Joseph K. Schaefer, Fred Schubert, George T, Schwartz, Charles S. 
Shick, Gerald F. Simon, Rubin Simon, Alfred St. Pierre, Jack Steinmiller, William T. 
Stuart, Otto Sulsinger, A. Edward Tanner, J. Henry Taylor, Irving M. Teitelbaum, 
George I. Terry, Omer Van Houten, Frank Vinatieri, Clarence E. Voirol, William E. 
Wall, Jack Wasserstein, James G. Welch, Paul Welgoss, A. G. Wheaton, J. B. Wideen, 
Joseph J. White, Jr., and George Zabel. 



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MARCH, 1965 



29 



Past President of Loeal 929 Receives Honor at Banquet 




CONTRIBUTORS to Brotherhood progress are these members of Local 929 of Los Angeles* who received lapel emblems 
denoting 25 or more years continuous membership, at recent Local Union ceremonies. They are: P. W. Anderson, Kenneth 
Acock, Saeed Akmal, Joseph Anderson, William Bibby, Jime Carter, W. R. Chapman, E. J. Cranmer, Hurvel Davis, A. Detwiler, 
Albert Dunstan, Paul Fromholz, Harry Fuller, Erick Gutman, Charles Haley, W. A. Harding, Carl Johnson, Ralph Krebill, Oscar 
Kringlcn, Frank Kunert, Nick Lang, Joe Ligon, Gordon Linklater, Joseph Martin, W. C. Mathwick, Harry Murray, David Nel- 
son, Fred Nyberg, Pat Pattisson, Ralph Porche, M. A. Prukop, Elton Randolph, P. J. Rcgh, Paul Robinson, Charles Sanford, 
James Thompson, Elvin VanCamp, Bastrom VanVliet, Ralph Welden and George Whitman. 

Those honored but not present were: Chris Akridge, Ernest Anderson, W. A. Bloom, A. J. Broad, Floyd Crockett, Alfonso 
Espinoza, John Geiger, P. H. Gibson, Otto Hill, Helmer Larson, Irving Lattray, Robert Lattray, Scott Lindsay, Fred Mecklen- 
burg, A. M. Paradis, Charles Secky, David Wescott, Dave Yoder and J. I. Engle. Included in the picture are the officers of Lo- 
cal Union No. 929 and honored guests Jim Skelton, business representative of Local Union No. 2435. 



LOS ANGELES, CALIF.— At the re- 
cent luncheon to present 25- and 50-year 
emblems to 59 veteran brothers of Local 



929 in Los Angeles, a surprised recipient 
of the past president emblem was T. E. 
Sanford, who is now the business repre- 




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NAME. 

ADDRESS 

CITY. ..ZONE STATE.. 



sentative of that local. Both he and Pat 
Pattisson, the present president are charter 
members, and they represent the only 
presidents Local 929 has had since its be- 
ginning in 1949. Brother Sanford was 
elected the first president and served only 
six months before becoming financial 
secretary and business representative. 
Brother Pattisson was the succeeding 
president and still remains in that posi- 
tion, a tribute to his ability and popular- 
ity in Local 929. Brother Pattisson is also 
a business representative of the District 
Council of Carpenters. 



Carl Johnson, 79- 
year-old veteran of 
Local 929 received 
a 50-year lapel pin 
during the cere- 
monies. 




T. E. Sanford, past president of Local 
929, left above, was presented a past- 
president emblem, by Pat Pattisson, cur- 
rent, longtime president of the local un- 
ion. Both are charter members. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



Canal Zone Veteran Recalls Days of 
Panama 'Big Ditch ' Construction 



BALBOA, CANAL ZONE— A recent 
article in The Panama Canal Spillway, 

the official publication of the Panama 
Canal, brought to light the interesting 
and inspirational life of Brother Karl 
Phillip Curtis of Local 913, Balboa, 
Canal Zone, The 50-year pin that was 
presented to Karl represents much more 
than 50-years of service in the Carpen- 
ter's Union; it represents the pioneering ' 
spirit of the early organizers in our un- 
ion and the hardships they had to en- 
dure. The International is very proud 
of Brother Curtis and his wife. 

A jackknife cot, a wooden box to sit 
on, and handful of nails to drive into the 
walls — upon which to hang clothes — 
were all the furnishings provided newly 
arrived carpenters when Karl Phillip Cur- 
tis came to the Isthmus. And their home 
away from home was a bleak barracks 
building at the old Canal townsite of 
Culebra. Many left, but Karl Curtis re- 
mained to do his part in building up the 
Canal communities as they are today. 

He helped organize the local carpen- 
ter's union and is the first and only 50- 
year member on the Isthmus of Local 
913. 

Brother Curtis was recently presented 
a 50-year pin by B. S. Spangler, president 
of the local carpenter's union, who later 
returned dressed as Santa Claus and on 
behalf of the union also presented Curtis 
a desk pen set fashioned from old, origi- 
nal French railroad ties and rail. 

Mrs. Curtis, a construction days nurse, 
received from the union a pair of Cape 




Brother Karl Curtis receives gift from 
Santa (B. S. Spangler) 

Cod hurricane lamps with lignum vitae 
bases, a replica of those that date back 
to 1756. Miss Katherine Taliercio, R.N., 
presented her a beautiful orchid corsage 
from the nurses' union. 

At the celebration, Curtis reminisced 
on the construction days era and related 
many anecdotes. Talks also were given 
by the vice president of the carpenters' 
union, Robert Mecaskey, and by Robert 
L. Thompson, Administrative Assistant 
at Gorgas Hospital. 

Curtis, who has spent most of his 
life on the Isthmus, is a native of Tops- 
field, Mass. In his files he has his ap- 
pointment to employment as a carpenter 
in the Engineering Department of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission issued by 
the Office of the Administrator of Isth- 

Continued on page 32 




Yesteryear at Culebra: The Panama Canal Administration Building was under con- 
struction, destined to house the offices of Col. George W. Goethals and Engineer John 
F. Stevens, when the above photograph was taken during a Construction Day noon- 
hour. In the second row, fourth from right, is Karl P. Curtis, first president of Local 
913, United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, and first and only 50- 
year member on the Isthmus. 



"I Earn Two Incomes Now' 



Says John Bennie, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
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Est. 1948 
MAIL COUPON NOW! 



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STAIRWAY 

CONSTRUCTION 
MADE EASY 




With the aid of the 

STAIRWAY CONSTRUCTION 
HANDBOOK 

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MARCH, 1965 



31 




3 ' r 

3 easy ways to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Specdbor "88" for all eloctrlc drills. 
Bores foster in any wood at any angle. Sizes Vi" 
to V, $.75 each. 5'" to 1". $.85 each. IVa" 
to 1 J i". Si. 30 each. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, 7 /b" to 
3". Only $4.20. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, 5b" to 1%". Only $3.80. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
Gives double- cutter boring action. Only 16 turns 
to bore 1" holes through 1" wood. Sizes Y4" to 
\V%" , As low as $1.15 each. 

EVERY IRWIN BIT made of high analysis 
steel, heat tempered, machine-sharpened 
and highly polished, too. Buy from your 
independent hardware, building supply or 
lumber dealer. 

Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 
only $1.25 for 50 ft. size 
New and improved Irwin self-chalking design. 
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■ every bit as good os ffie name 




Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EN- 
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and Jack rafters completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is Y 2 
inch rise to 12 inch run . Pitches in- 
crease Vz inch rise each time until 
the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
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width is Vi inch and they increase 
%" each time until they cover a 50 
foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Hip, Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
pitches. 

A hip roof is 48'-9 1 / 4" wide. Pitch 
is 7JS" rise to 12" run. You can pick 
out the length of Commons, Hips and 
Jacks and the Cuts in ONE MINUTE. 
Let us prove it, or return your money. 



Getting the lengths of rafters by the spah and 
the method of setting up the tables is fully pro- 
tected by the 1917 &. 1944 Copyrights. 



Price $2.50 Postpaid. If C.O.D. fee extra. 

Canada send S2.75 Foreign Postal M. O. or 

Bank Money Order payable in U. S. dollars. 

Canada can not take C.O.D. orders. 

California add 4% tax. 10£ each. 

A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 405 Palo Alto, Calif. 94302 



Canal Zone Veteran 
Continued from page 31 

mian Canal Affairs in behalf of the Chief 
Engineer of the Commission, dated Sep- 
tember 5. 1905. at Washington, D. C. 

lie left New York on the old SS Ad- 
vance of the Panama Railroad Line on 
October 7. 1905, and arrived in Colon 
October 14. with 22 other carpenters. All 
were sent to Culebra, where they were 
assigned a barracks building, a one-story 
screened structure without ceiling or win- 
dows. A 24-inch opening under the roof 
provided the only ventialation and light. 
In an ell were three wash basins, three 
showers, and three toilets. The only furni- 
ture was a jackknife cot for each man, 
issued at the carpenter shop, together 
with a wooden box from the Commissary 
for a chair for each, and a handful of 
nails for hanging clothing. 

Meal Tickets 

A three-story hotel in Culebra was 
newly completed and the men ate in the 
dining room there, using meal tickets. The 
cost of each meal was 30 cents. 

He started work at 56 cents per hour, 
but quarters were rent-free. After 3 
months he received a raise to 65 cents. 
A 2-cent an hour raise followed each year 
until the men were placed on a monthly 
pay basis. 

The newly-arrived carpenters' first 
jobs were on renovation of the old French 
hospital, which was above the hotel, with 
space for about 75 patients. Next Curtis 
and his partner were sent to the Adminis- 
tration Building hill, to build a toolhouse. 

After the Canal construction was com- 
pleted April 1, 1914, the Canal employ- 
ees began to be moved into Balboa and 



Cristobal. The Governor's Administra- 
tion Building and concrete quarters for 
employees were begun. 

On December 14, 1914, at a meeting 
held in the old Ancon clubhouse, which 
later burned, Curtis was installed as the 
first president of Local 913. Joe Johnston, 
a Building Division carpenter and a 
member of a carpenters' local in Phila- 
delphia, had written headquarters in In- 
dianapolis, Ind.. for the permit and in- 
stalled the officers. Twenty-three mem- 
bers joined at that time. Curtis was presi- 
dent for 2 years and then was recording 
secretary for many years. 

Medal Holder 

Curtis holds the Roosevelt Medal for 
iVi years' construction service. His medal 
has three bars, year bars representing 2 
years: 1907-1909; 1909-1911; and 1911- 
1913. 

During his years of service with the 
Panama Canal, he worked o-a the Chief 
Engineer's house for John F. Stevens, 
which was finished in the spring of 1906, 
and on quarters and clubhouses at Em- 
pire and Cristobal. In November 1907 
he transferred to Ancon Hospital as main- 
tenance foreman and was employed there 
until November 30. 1940, when he re- 
tired due to ill-health. 

He left the Isthmus that year and with 
his wife went to Chile. Up in the Andes 
he recovered his health, toured Argentina 
by car and then after visiting Peru, Ecua- 
dor, and Colombia they returned to the 
Isthmus in June 1941. 

Curtis was the first man to discover 
the Code and Veraguas culture and 
through his hobby has formed firm 
friendships with officials of Harvard, 
Yale, the Smithsonian Institution, the 
University of Pennsylvania, and Brook- 
lyn Museum. 



Local 1292 Awards 50- Year Pins 




HUNTINGTON, N. Y. — Members of Local 1292 recently received 50-year pins. 
Included were, front row, left to right are Morris Levine, Gustave Franz and Her- 
bert Velsor; back row, left to right, James Mullen, Thomas Young, Julius Dreusike 
and Charles Drake. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



Local 1266 Holds Awards Banquet 




THOSE RECEIVING 25-year pins were: First row, seated, W. H. Burkhart, B. D. 
Sylvester, A. W. Fox, W. T. Jones and C. E. Dye. Second row, standing, D. J. Hobbs, 
J. H. Woodcock, A. G. Dinsmore, A. Rosentritt and A. G. Bruce. Third row, standing, 
R. A. Coop, Jr., C. E. La Rue, D. A. Carlson, general executive board member J. O. 
Mack, H. Seay and Cecil Dillingham. Those not present were J. M. Clements, L. W. 
Gunn and J. D. Sinclair. 








PAST PRESIDENTS of Local 1266 are: seated, left to right, D. D. Norwood, Hub 
Ottinger, Ben Hendrickson and Homer Wise. Standing, Elmer Schwartz, Perry Leigon, 
general executive board member, J. O. Mack, G. A. McNeil and Chester Smith. Those 
not present were John Wagner and Tom Evans. 



Helpers? 



A nationwide poll was conducted 
in Germany to find out whether 
husbands helped their wives with 
the housework. 

Exactly 75% of the husbands 
said yes, they did. But only 51% 
of the wives said they got any help 
from their spouses. 



AUSTIN, TEX.— Local 1266 of Aus- 
tin recently held its awards banquet at 
which 18 25-year members and nine past 
presidents of the local were honored. 

Brother G. A. McNeil, business repre- 
sentative, was master of ceremonies. The 
mayor and mayor pro- tern of Austin 
spoke. The honored guest of the evening 
was Board member J. O. Mack of the 
Sixth District. President Fox of Local 
1266 assisted in the presentation of the 
awards. Past presidents of the union were 
introduced to the audience. Nine past 
presidents were there. 



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Ventura Council Organizes Manufacturers 
Of Mobile Homes and Surfboards 




REPRESENTATIVES of Ventura International Plastics. Inc. and the union are: 
front row, from the left, Barry Greenberg, salesman; William O. Fisher, president of 
the firm; Mona Black, office secretary; Duke Kahanamoku, 76-ycar-old "Father of 
surfing" from Hawaii; Galye Carney, bookkeeper; and Don Gruber, maintenance. 
Back row, left to right are: Jack Atnip, shipping; Jack Ruthburn, production fore- 
man: and members of the negotiating committee — Jim Creighton, Don Magee and 
Bob Proctor. 



VENTURA, CALIF.— The Ventura 
County District Council of Carpenters 
recently negotiated a contract with Dual- 
Wide Mobile Homes, a trailer-manufac- 
turing firm. This is the first trailer plant 
organized in Ventura County. 

Signing of the pace brought an im- 
mediate wage hike to the nearly 100 pro- 
duction workers at the Oxnard plant, as 
well as paid holidays, vacations, and a 
company-financed insurance plan. 

The District Council also announced 
that an agreement had been signed with 
Ventura International Plastics, Inc., a 
surfboard manufacturing plant. To our 
knowledge, this is the first surfboarding 
plant to be organized in the history of 
the International. 

Harry Harkelroad of the California 
State Council of Carpenters worked 
closely with the district council in organ- 
izing the employees as well as in nego- 
tiations at both plants. 




SITTING in the big living room of a 
Dual-Wide mobile home are, left to right, 
Warren Lincoln, president of the Oxnard 
trailer manufacturing firm; J. M. Hairs- 
ton, general manager; and Sam Heil, 
business representative for the Ventura 
County District Council of Carpenters. 



Strike at Shamrock Oil in Eighth Month 



DUMAS. TEXAS— The Oil, Chemical 
and Atomic Workers International Union 
Local 4-487 at Dumas, Texas has been 
on strike since August 9, 1964, against 
the Shamrock Oil Company. The union 
wants improvements in contract language 
plus wages and pensions negotiated with 
most other companies in the industry. 

The company has refused to negotiate, 



although the plant has been organized 
for many years. Shamrock Oil has re- 
opened the plant with scab labor and ap- 
parently is operating at almost full 
capacity. 

The Brotherhood joins the O.C.A.W.I. 
in an effort to make this company realize 
that they cannot operate successfully on a 
non-union basis. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 




Woodgrained perforated panel 
(Shown beside plain panel) 

Royalcote Walnut Peg-Board is being 
introduced by Masonite Corporation as 
the company's first woodgrained perfo- 
rated hardboard panel. 

Developed for easy coordination with 
presents colors of Royalcote Walnut wall 
paneling, the new Vs" Peg-Board is 
offered in three Walnut grains: a light 
tone Glacier Walnut, a medium color 
Tawny Walnut, and Sable Walnut, which 
has the darker appearance of fine wal- 
nut furniture. 

The Walnut Peg-Board, which com- 
bines woodgrain beauty with utility and 
the easy upkeep of a factory finish, is 
expected to find wide application in both 
residential and commercial use. The 
4'x8' panels can be installed over prac- 
tically any surface. 

An exciting contrast is provided by 
Masonite's new fixtures of white Delrin 
plastic, which fit quickly and easily into 
the perforations. Matching wood mold- 
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available to aid installation. 

For further information, please contact 
the Masonite Corporation, 29 North 
Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60606. 

DOUBLE-DUTY WOOD RULE 

The new Murray Double Duty Wood 
Rule (Copyrighted) combines, in one 
measuring device, the standard foot and 
inch marking of the conventional fold- 
ing 6 foot rule with the four basic Archi- 
tect's Scales, namely: Vs — Va — 3 /s — Vz 
inch to the foot. These scale markings 
are located at the lower edges of both 
end sections of the rule, front and back 
sides. 

This combination rule ends the neces- 

MARCH, 1965 



sity of carrying two rules on the job — 
folding rule plus extra scale rule. The 
pocket scale rule has always presented 
problems to the user of a separate, easily 
lost scale, plus the difficulty in finding a 
satisfactory pocket in one's clothing for 
safely carrying it. The folding 6 foot 
rule is such a standard part of any man's 
equipment on the job that it is auto- 
matically carried and stored without 
difficulty. 

The Murray Double Duty Scale and 
Rule enables the user to both measure 
distances in the conventional use of a 
rule, plus accurate reading of a scaled 
print on the job or on the drawing table. 

The Murray Double Duty 6 foot fold- 
ing wood rule, by including Vs" — Va" — 
3 /s" — Vi" Architect's Scales makes pos- 
sible the reading of scaled drawings in 
all standard scales. For instance, the 3 /s" 
scale can be used for 3 /a inch scale by 
measuring the drawing made to 3 /a" scale 
and dividing by two. The Vs inch scale 
can be used for the 1/16 inch scale by 
measuring the drawing and multiplying 
by two. This procedure, explained in 
an enclosure sent with the rule, can be 
applied to the 1" — VA" and 3" Archi- 
tect's Scales. 

Murray Double Duty Wood Folding 6 
foot Rules are manufactured by the Mur- 
ray Equipment Co., Inc., Box 267, York, 
Pa. 



A HELYX floor screw application 
guide is available by writing on com- 
pany letterhead to Hillwood Manufactur- 
ing Co., 21700 St. Clair Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio 44117. 




Double-duty wood rule also includes 
architect's scales in its calibrations. 



BETTER-HOLDING DRIVE SCREW 

A floor held down with HELYX drive 
screws is a better floor than one put 
down with cut nails or wire brads — and 
it costs less, too, claims The Hillwood 
Manufacturing Co., of Cleveland, Ohio. 

A 2 in. HELYX gives you 245 drive 
screws per pound. The additional hold- 
ing power of this tempered drive screw 
has been proven by the United States 
Testing Co., Hillwood points out. The 
tests proved the tremendous advantage 
HELYX has in pulling resistance. 

These floor screws lay a sound, dur- 
able, squeak-free hardwood floor. They 
are made from special-analysis square 
steel wire, twisted to produce a helical 
thread. Hardened and tempered, they 
pierce hard wood easily, will even pene- 
trate sheet steel. HELYX floor screws 
drive like a nail-turn and grip like a 
screw. 




Cross section showing use of Tempered 
Drive Nail in flooring application. 



INFRA-RED HEATER 

A new, small gas infra-red heater on 
wheels which is ideal for spot comfort 
heating of workers at outdoor construc- 
tion sites has been introduced by The 
C. A. Olsen Mfg. Co., Elyria, Ohio. 

Teamed with a small tank of propane 
gas and its factory-furnished golf-cart 
like wheels, the new heater is extremely 
portable. The unit stands only 45 inches 
high and weighs less than 24 pounds; it 
is also easily collapsible. 

Designated the Infra-Lux RH-16-U, 
the new heater is equipped with the same 
cast-iron burner and tri-mesh inconel 
screen assembly proved on the company's 
line of industrial comfort heating units. 
It has a polished aluminum reflector 
shade surrounding the burner assembly. 

For additional information on the 
RH-16-U portable infra-red heater, write 
Infra-Lux, The C. A. Olsen Mfg. Co., 
Elyria, Ohio. 




Heater is 45 inches high, weighs 45 lbs. 

35 




IN MEMOR1AM 



^55: 



1 .1. no. :. 
cincinnati, ohio 

Wilkins, Floyd J. 

1 l . NO. 4, 
DAVENPORT, IOWA 

Ibach, Edward 

\. Frank 
Sorensen. George. Sr. 

L.U. NO. 13, 
CHICAGO. ILL. 

Brown, James R. 
I llmauer. C. C. 
Lambert. Coolidge 
Melody. John 
Napolilano. J. J. 
Owens. Peter E. 
Peterson, Elof 
Phad. Verne L. 
Rchling. Leonard 
Veltri. Michael 

L.U. NO. 15, 
HACKENSACK, N. J. 

Daly. John 
Hartwigsen. Henry 

L.U. NO. 16, 
SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Dobbs, Harry J. 
Flesch. Walter E. 
Green. John 
Guinan, John H. 
Grant. Myron 
Hayes, Ernest 
Pierce, Harry L. 
Scott, Ross 
Senger, Frank 

L.U. NO. 20, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Galletta, Dominick 
Jensen, John 
Ricotta, Quenton 

L.U. NO. 27, 
TORONTO, ONT. 

Beausijour, Moise 
Carter, William 
Cathcart, John 
Codner, Eli 
Cope, Lloyd H. 
Hines, Aubrey 
Kaarto, Babo 
Lonsway, Roy 
McManus, Joseph 
McMurray, Thomas 
Mattison, Ivor 
Oakes, Lloyd 
Prost, John S. 
Pucknell, Danny 
Pyke, Gary G. 
Rabkow, Mike 
Ritchie, David 
Robinson. Llewellyn F. 
Sandberg, Gerhard 
Short. Herbert 
Steele, Bertram 
Young, Cameron 

L.U. NO. 36, 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Caton, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 42, 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Fabian, Rudolph 



1 ernandez, Louis 
Schwarz, John. Sr. 
Sullivan, W. J. 

L.U. NO. 50, 
KNOXMLLE, TENN. 

Blanton, Henry Lewis 
Denton. Larston O. 
Jennings, Cleo 
Sheckels, Frank 

L.U. NO. 51, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Benson, Wilfred 
L.U. NO. 54, 

BERWYN, ILL. 

Mladar. George 
Zwijacz. Andrew 

L.U. NO. 61, 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

O'Brien. Dan I. 
Rohrback, Henry J. 

L.U. NO. 62, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Holmberg. Ernest 
Sterbis, Anton 

L.U. NO. 72, 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Cullingworth, Francis 
Piotter, Herman 

L.U. NO. 87, 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Bergstrom, Carl 
Brown, Tom 
Mattson, Iver 
Sobkowiak, Joseph 
Waldner, John 

L.U. NO. 100, 
MUSKEGON, MICH. 

Oberline, Richard 

L.U. NO. 115, 

BRIDGEPORT, 

CONN. 

Eckstrom, John N. 
Guskie, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 121, 
VINELAND, N. J. 

Jost. Robert 
Miskelly, Charles 
Zimmerman, 

Maurice G. 

L.U. NO. 129, 
HAZLETON, PA. 

McGeady, William 

L.U. NO. 139, 
JERSEY CITY, N. J. 

Abram, William 
Melega, John 

L.U. NO. 142, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Bowden, Smith 
Burnett, Walter 
Graham, Harry 
Meirs, Earl 
Nichols, Colleen 
Nardei, John 

L.U. NO. 144, 
MACON, GA. 

Collins, Raymond Hall 
Gibson, J. B. 



L.U. NO. 157. 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Goisman, Sam 
Katz, Joseph 
Rigoff, Morris 
Shelly, Sam 

L.U. NO. 161, 
KENOSHA, WIS. 

Fechner, Ernest 

L.U. NO. 198. 
DALLAS, TEX. 

Nanlt. Herman J. 
Rutherford, R. A. 

L.U. NO. 200 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Atwood. Harry 
L.U. NO. 211 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Herbolich, George M. 

L.U. NO. 217, 
WESTERLY, R. I. 

Barker, W. Sinclair 

L.U. NO. 224, 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 

Snyder, John 

L.U. NO. 246, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Erk, Joseph 
Roman, Michael 
Rosenberg, Charles 
Ventricelli, Michael 
Wurzer, Ruben 

L.U. NO. 264 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Averbeck, Henry 
Helfenstein, John 
Herauf. Michael 
Jensen, Lars 
Reupert, Arthur 
Schlitt, Joseph 
Schmidt, Walter 
Vodopa. George 

L.U. NO. 266, 
STOCKTON, CALIF. 

Bathurst, Joseph 
Bjornson, Carl 
Lovett, S. M. 

L.U. NO. 278, 
WATERTOWN, N. Y. 

Cullen, Patrick J. 

L.U. NO. 283, 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Pendrey. Frank A. 

L.U. NO. 337, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Anderson, A. M. 
Dupuis, James A. 
Felker, William 
Nyhus, Milton 
Timonen, Oscar 
Underhill, Lloyd 

L.U. NO. 359, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Cook, Frederick J. 

L.U. NO. 401, 
PITTSTON, PA. 

Bruno, Frank 



La Nunziato, Michael 
Miller, Edward H. 

L.U. NO. 403, 
ALEXANDRIA, LA. 

Marsh, Willie 

L.U. NO. 406, 
BETHLEHEM, PA. 

Mitman. John 

L.U. NO. 462, 
GREENSBURG, PA. 

Lenhart, William H. 

L.U. NO. 472, 
ASHLAND, KY. 

Clere. Paul R., Jr. 
Middleton. Albert L. 

L.U. NO. 493, 
MOUNT VERNON, 

N. Y. 

Coscia, Belsario 
Gustalson, Gustaf 
Widen, Gustaf 

L.U. NO. 512, 

ANN ARBOR, MICH. 

Falta, John A. 
Slusser, Ray E. 

L.U. NO. 608 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Bollini, Louis 
Engborg, Arvid 

L.U. NO. 639, 
AKRON, OHIO 

Bean, Davis 
Gill, Lemon 
Goodyear, Clarence 
Hall, Glen 
Mealey, Ralph 

L.U. NO. 642, 
RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Belcher, L. F. 
Clark, James R. 
Ramey, Roy M. 
Rampoldi, Ray F. 
Riedel, August P. 
Scott, Elliott B. 
Stewart, Clifford A. 
Utley, R. D. 

L.U. NO. 647, 
FAIRFIELD, CONN. 

Gyor, Michael 
Williams, M. B. 

L.U. NO. 651, 
JACKSON, MICH. 

Clemont, Anthony 
Ford. Ara B. 
Smith, Clark J. 

L.U. NO. 657, 
SHEBOYGAN, WIS. 

Mueller, William G. 

L.U. NO. 710, 
LONG BEACH, 
CALIF. 

Austin, Lewis W. 
Auth, Robert C. 
Evanoff, Peter 
Fisher, J. L. 
Grimwood, C. W. 
Nordeen, E. A. 
Phillips, Joseph A. 



Sherrill, William A. 
Smith, Louis H. 

L.U. NO. 735, 
MANSFIELD, OHIO 

Brown, Claude 
Burger, George 
Etzwiler, Ralph 
Friend, John 
Koon, John W. 
Weddington, William 

L.U. NO. 764, 
SHREVEPORT, LA. 

Carroll, Roy 
Frye, Leroy 
Munn. O. H. 

L.U. NO. 783, 
SIOUX FALLS, S. D. 

Nelson. Gus A. 

L.U. No. 787, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Jamisko, Carl 
Waisanen, Jaffet 

L.U. NO. 829, 
SANTA CRUZ, 
CALIF. 

Albert, Frank 
Chalfin, Joseph 
Gatlin, Charles G. 
Hewitt, Harry 
Rose, Jack 
Wilson, Alfred F. 

L.U. NO. 854, 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 

Hill, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 871, 
BATTLE CREEK, 
MICH. 

Bauman, John 

L.U. NO. 929, 
LOS ANGELES, 
CALIF. 

Fish, Arthur 
Frilot, Preston 
Haynes, Perley 
Henderson, Cleveland 
Lewis, Keith E. 
Merrill, Lester C. 
Minion, Ralph A. 
Riedemann, Fred C. 

L.U. NO. 930, 

ST. CLOUD, MINN. 

Dibblee, Theodore 
Gardner, Charles J. 
Grams, Edmund 
Hennen, Mike 

L.U. NO. 943, 
TULSA, OKLA. 

Brown, George J. 
Crain, Andrew 
Glenn, W. A. 
Horton, Joseph A. 
Hunt, Arthur M. 
Myers, C. A. 
Phillips, A. A. 

(Concluded on Page 37) 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



L.U. NO. 950, 
LYNBROOK, N. Y. 

Anderson, Charles B. 

L.U. NO. 982, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

DuPart. Victor E. 

L.U. NO. 1013, 
BRIDGEPORT, 
CONN. 

Nelson, Nels F. 

L.U. NO. 1055, 
LINCOLN, NEBR. 

Bock, Max A. 
Knapp, Frank E. 
Wells, James L. 

L.U. NO. 1089, 
PHOENIX, ARIZ. 

Bateman, C. V. 
Fox, Robert J. 

L.U. NO. 1130, 
TITUSVILLE, PA. 

Peterson, O. E. 

L.U. NO. 1319, 
ALBUQUERQUE, 

N. M. 

Maynor, E. W. 
Mouriquand, S. A. 

L.U. NO. 1323, 
MONTEREY, CALIF. 

Lobel, Harry 

L.U. NO. 1388, 
OREGON CITY, 
ORE. 



Berry, C. C. 
Miller, Otto E. 
Thornton, Elvis H. 

L.U. NO. 1394, 
FORT 
LAUDERDALE, FLA. 

Lawrence, Edward W. 
McKnight, B. D. 

L.U. NO. 1397, 
NORTH 
HEMPSTEAD, N. Y. 

Cassano, Anthony 

L.U. NO. 1408, 
REDWOOD CITY, 
CALIF. 

Alger, Floyd 
Austin, James H. 
Bannister, James 
Bartlett, A. H. 
Hill, Milton 
Price. Frank 
Wheeler, Albert 

L.U. NO. 1423, 
CORPUS CHRISTI, 
TEXAS 

Morris, Albert C. 

L.U. NO. 1437, 
COMPTON, CALIF. 

Kaylor, John R. 

L.U. NO. 1478, 
REDONDO BEACH, 

Den Beste, Marion 
Nash, Franklin Doyle 



L.U. NO. 1497, 
EAST LOS ANGELES, 
CALIF. 

Harley, Robert 
Larkin, James L. 

L.U. NO. 1513, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Brown, Morris 
Guyer, Abraham 

L.U. NO. 1520, 
BRIDGEPORT, 

CONN. 
Munch, Fred 

L.U. NO. 1570, 
MARYSVILLE, 
CALIF. 

Blount, Doris E. 
Codorniz, Anthony M. 
Lee, Don E. 
Matherly, Charles T. 
Sturm, James S. 

L.U. NO. 1590, 
WASHFNGTON, D. C. 

Anthony, Melvin, Sr. 

Luther B. 
Crampton, Sr., 
Geffert, Robert J. 
Leksberg, Gustav 
Melnick, Max 
Snowden, Clifton R. 

L.U. NO. 1598, 
VICTORIA, B. C. 

Cartwright, Wilfred A. 

L.U. NO. 1632, 
SAN LUIS OBISPO, 
CALIF. 



Bangle, William 
Campbell, Charles 
Gibbs, Fred 
Ormonde, Manuel 

L.U. NO. 1665, 
ALEXANDRIA, VA. 

Ames, Maurice L. 
CofFman, Arnold B. 
Helphinstine, A. 

L.U. NO. 1725, 
DAYTONA BEACH, 
FLA. 

Fitch, Thomas 
Wilson, James 

L.U. NO. 1822, 
FORT WORTH, 
TEXAS 

Fugett, Paul 
Pitts, George A. 
Secrist, George E. 

L.U. NO. 1846, 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Bajon, John J. 
Cummings, Archie 
D'Aunoy, George, Sr. 
Laurent. Sidney P. 
Lea, William O. 

L.U. NO. 1913, 

VAN NUYS, CALIF. 
Burrows, Paul T. 
Macauley, Morris A. 
Nicolay, Owen D. 



L.U. NO. 1931, 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Juneau, Paul C. 

L.U. NO. 2020, 

SAN DIEGO, CALIF. 

Hurst, Archie M. 

L.U. NO. 2164, 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Bottoms, William E. 
Haskoll, John T. 
Lewis, George D. 

L.U. NO. 2236, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Abrahams, John 
Aho, Isaac 
Erickson, Edward 
Force, Albert 
Kisel, John 
Siren, R. A. 
Tillman, Green 

L.U. NO. 2288, 
LOS ANGELES, 
CALIF. 

Kopeczy, Joseph 
Payne, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 2435, 
INGLEWOOD, 
CALIF. 

Erickson, Godfrey B. 

L.U. NO. 3208, 
LOVELAND, COLO. 

Grant, W. H. 




for FREE 
Booklet 
"Mone y Makin g Facts" m 



File Saws Easily 

AUTOMATICALLY 



You don't need special training or previous experience to get perfect, sharp 
blades with the Foley Automatic Saw Filer. Operation is simple — you just 
follow easy step by step instructions. "The first saw I sharpened with my 
Foley Filer came out 100%," writes Clarence E. Parsons. The Model 200 is 
the first and only machine that precision files hand, band and both "com- 
bination" and cross-cut circular saws. It's so mechanically accurate it's 
used by saw manufacturers! Takes minimum space in corner of shop. 

Set up in Basement or Garage 

-. Foley can show you how to establish your own saw filing service in 

""" --,,.._ your basement or garage. A small cash payment puts a new Foley 

Saw Filer in your hands. The profits you make easily handle the 
low monthly payments. Operating expense is low — only 7c for files 
and electricity to turn out a complete saw filing job. Mail coupon 
now for money-making facts and business-building ideas. No 
salesman will call. 



! FOLEY MFG. CO., 

I Please rush free book, 
j time payment plan. 


318-5 Foley Bldg., Minneapolis 18, Minn. 
"Money Making Facts" and details on easy 




1 City 


7nne . State 



MARCH, 1965 



37 



You Can Be 
a Highly Paid 

CONSTRUCTION 

COST 

ESTIMATOR 



If you have the ambition to become the top 
man on the payroll — or if you are planning 
to start a successful contracting business of 
your own — we can teach you everything you 
need to know to become an expert construc- 
tion cost estimator. A journeyman carpenter 
with the equivalent of a high school education 
is well qualified to study our easy-to-\inderstand 
home study course. Construction Cost Esti- 
mating. 

WHAT WE TEACH 

We teach you to read plans and specifications, 
take otf materials, and figure the costs of ma- 
terials and labor. You prepare complete esti- 
mates from actual working drawings just like 
those you will find on every construction proj- 
ect. You learn how to arrive at the bid price 
that is correct for work in your locality based 
on your material prices and wage rates. Our 
course is self-teaching. After you study each 
lesson you correct your own work by compar- 
ing it to sample estimates which we supply. 
You don't need to send, lessons back and forth ; 
therefore you can proceed at your own pace. 
When you complete this course you will know 
how to estimate the cost of all types of con- 
struction : residences, schools, churches, and in- 
dustrial, commercial, and institutional build- 
ings. Our instructions are practical and com- 
plete. We show you exactly how to proceed 
step by step, from the time you unroll the 
plans until you actually submit your proposal. 

ACCURATE LABOR COST DATA 

The labor cost data which we supply is not 
vague and theoretical — it is correct for work 
in your locality — we leave nothing to guess- 
work. Instead of giving you a thousand rea- 
sons why it is difficult to estimate construction 
costs accurately, we teach you how to arrive 
at a competitive bid price — low enough to get 
the job — high enough to realize a profit. 

STUDY WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

You don't need to pay us one cent until you 
first satisfy yourself that our course is what 
you need and want. We will send you plans, 
specifications, estimate sheets, material and 
labor cost data, and complete instructions for 
ten days study ; then if you are not convinced 
that our course will advance you in the build- 
ing business, just return what we have sent 
you and there is no obligation whatever. Ii 
you decide to study our course, pay us $13.25 
monthly for three months, a total of only 
$39.75. 

Send your name and address today — we will 
do the rest. 



CONSTRUCTION COST INSTITUTE 

Dept. C-365 — University Station 
Denver, Colorado 80210 



■AN II N I AVIS 



passed away January 8, 
[., passed away January 



D. Clarence Blake of Local Union 11, Cleveland. Ohio, passed away Jan- 
uary 4. 1965 and was buried at Rocky River, Ohio. 

George Stritter of Local Union 429. Montclair, N. J. 
1965 and was buried at Bloomfield, N.J. 

George McBride of Local Union 448. Waukegan, II 
19, 1965 and was buried at Waukegan. III. 

Leslie Duggins of Local Union 64. Louisville, Ky., passed away January 27, 
1965 and was buried in the Home cemetery. 

Union Members Who Visited the Home During January 

John F. McCall. L.U. 548. Minneapolis. Minn. 

Richard Annis. L.U. 2423. Chicago. 111. 

Wilbur Allen, L.U. 1590. Silver Spring. Md. 

Win. G. May. L.U. 419, Chicago. 111. 

John R. Enkind, L.U. 73. Chicago, 111. 

Clarence Jensen. L.U. 1373, Flint, Mich. 

John P. Felix,. L.U. 15. Hackensack. N. J., now living Hillsdale, N. J. 

Robert C. Holt, L.U. 531, St. Petersburg, Fla. 

James W. Hoffses, L.U. 531, St. Petersburg. Fla. 

Homer J. Pellerin. L.U. 107, Worcester, Mass. 

Ernest M. Short. L.U. 765. Mascantah. 111. 

Thomas E. McGuire, L.U. 200, Columbus, Ohio. 

Carl Benson. L.U. 58, Chicago. 111., now living in Clearwater, Fla. 

W. E. Crawford, L.U. 44, Urbana, 111. 

William Brown. L.U. 715, Elizabeth. N. J. 

Harold I. Chamberlain. L.U. 94, Mansfield, Mass. 

Carl Tellman. L.U. 637, Hamilton. Ohio. 

G. Victor Johnson. L.U. 87, St. Paul. Minn. 

Chauncey Barton, L.U. 1837, Suffolk County, Long Island. 

Selby S. Carnell, L.U. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y., now living Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Fred Holmes, L.U. 1739, St. Louis, Mo. 

Edward A. Mesch, L.U. 104, Dayton, Ohio. 

Gustav Carlson. L.U. 121, Vineland, N. J. 

Frank A. Taylor, L.U. 1772, Hicksville. N. Y. 

Edwin E. Larson, L.U. 820, Nekoosa, Wis. 

Joe Carlson, L.U. 62. Chicago. 111., now living Lexington. 

Leonard Carignan. L.U. 1702, St. Hyacinthe. Quebec. Canada. 

Turner Anderson, L.U. 81, Chicago, 111. 

Walter S. Thesen, L.U. 58, Chicago, 111. 

Harold E. Knowe, L.U. 176. Newport, R. I., now living Lake Wales, Fla. 

Elmo Larson, L.U. 2073, Milwaukee, Wis. 

A. Hildeen, L.U. 7. Minneapolis. Minn. 

Joe D. Brown. L.U. 413, South Bend, Ind. 

Warren Williams, L.U. 727, Hialeah, Fla.. now living Zephyrhills, Fla. 

Hermund Silvertsen, L.U. 1456, New York, N. Y. • 

Graham W. Jones, L.U. 331, Norfolk, Va. 

Donald Rullman, L.U. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Melbourne Kriete, L.U. 1307, Evanston, 111., now living Chicago, 111. 

Victor W. Samson, L.U. 448, Waukegan, 111. 

H. Kromphardt, L.U. 183, Peoria, 111. 

John Aigeltinger, L.U. 12, Syracuse, N. Y., now living Canasto, N. Y. 

M. J. Davis, L.U. 143, Pola Sola Station, Canton, Ohio. 

Peter Wolf, L.U. 1296, San Diego, Calif. 

Stanley Chalk. L.U. 101, Baltimore, Md. 

Robert M. Hodge, L.U. 94, Warwick, R. I. 

Edward Powers, L.U. 2265, Detroit, Mich. 

Edward R. Baker, L.U. 67, Quincy, Mass. 

Jack Hill, Illinois State Council, Peoria, 111. 

A. R. Trappier, Wisconsin State Council, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Howard T. Krull, L.U. 1899, Hobart, 111. 

J. T. Moon, L.U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 

Maurice W. Howes, L.U. 444, Pittsfield. Mass. 

Delbert A. Spooner, L.U. 278, Watertown, N. Y., now living Odgensburg, N. Y. 

Earl G. King. L.U. 117, Albany, N. Y., now living Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

H. E. Morris, L.U. 2024, Miami, Fla. 

Norbert Walkup, L.U. 127, Adrian, Mich. 

James A. Kunes, L.U. 1333, State College, Pa. 

Herman Schoonbeck, L.U. 334, Saginaw. Mich., now living St. Charles, Mich. 

Alfred Poscal, L.U. 1654, Midland, Mich. 

Joe T. Bayer, L.U. 506, Vancouver, B. C, Canada. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



— LAKELAND NEWS cont'd — 

A. Sorensen, L.U. 506, Vancouver, B. C, Canada. 

John R. Stevenson, former First General Vice President, United Brotherhood, 

L.U. 80, Chicago, 111., now living Indianapolis, Ind. 
Lloyd D. Van Patten, L.U. 19, Detroit, Mich., now living Wayne, Mich. 
Joe W. Westwood. L.U. 314, Detroit, Mich. 
Wm. J. Cameron, L.U. 452, Vancouver, B. C, Canada. 
John Takoch. L.U. 452. Vanucouver, B. C, Canada. 
Wm. Wehringer, L.U. 171, Youngstown, Ohio. 
Harry Hicks, L.U. 1772, Hicksville, N. Y. 
Everett A. Cathcart, L.U. 60, Plainfield, Ind. 
Robert B. Cathcart. L.U. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Gilbert Reinbrecht, L.U. 90, Elberfield, Ind. 
Sam Bartolet, L.U. 691, Williamsport, -Pa. 
Rudy Miller, L.U. 1590, Washington, D. C. 
Ray H. Luttrell, L.U. 701, Fresno, Calif. 
George R. Sajka, L.U. 15, East Patterson, N. J. 
Henry Spotholz, L.U. 15. Hackensack, N. J. 
John K. Johnsen, L.U. 787, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Abel M. Johnsen, L.U. 139, Jersey City, N. Y. 
Mandus Johnsen. L.U. 319, Jersey City, N. J. 
Ewald C. Schirmer, L.U. 181, Glenview, 111. 
C. Stonier, L.U. 20, Staten Island, N. Y. 
W. Holm, L.U. 246, Palisade, N. J. 
Rudolph Johnson, L.U. 534, Burlington, Iowa. 
Oscar Nelson, L.U. 141, Monterey, Ind. 
Joe Carlson, L.U. 62, Chicago, 111., now living Lexington, Ky. 
Albert Van Nus L.U. 297, Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Morton M. Stroudberg, L.U. 62, Chicago, 111. 
Emil Kalcok, L.U. 54, Salem, Wis. 



Like Father, Like Sons in This Family 




PLATTSBURGH, NEW YORK— Local 1042 of Plattsburgh has a member, Her- 
bert J. Duquette, who has convinced his five sons that the life of a union carpenter 
is the only life. It is unusual enough to find as many as six carpenters in one family, 
but six in the same local union is almost unheard of. In the picture above: The Du- 
quette Family, all members of Local 1042, from left — Donald H., 31; Gerald E., 30; 
Robert M., 29; Kenneth J., 24; Ralph H., 20-yr.-old apprentice; and Herbert J., 76. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 



Armco Steel 21 

Audel, Theodore 33 

Barclay Manufacturing 27 

Belsaw (Multi-purpose) 39 

Belsaw (Sharp-All) 34 

Chicago Technical College .. 17 

Construction Cost Institute . . 38 

Eliason Stair Gauge 34 

Estwing Manufacturing 24 

Foley Manufacturing 37 

Fugitt, Douglas 31 



Goldblatt Tool 30 

Hydrolevel 33 

Irwin Augur Bit 32 

Lee, H. D 29 

Locksmithing Institute 31 

Miller Sewer Rod 26 

Riechers, A 32 

Stanley Works Back Cover 

True Temper 19 

Watro Products 29 



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MARCH, 1965 



39 




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M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 



Unions Are the Best Hope for the Poor 



FOR most of us with good dress suits in the closet, 
an automatic transmission in the automobile, and 
roast beef on the table on Sunday, honest-to-goodness 
poverty seems far away. 

Those of us in the labor movement who have 
been waging our own war on poverty for decades 
have reaped many of the economic benefits of our 
industrial society, and poverty, to us, means "the 
other fellow." 

Let's take a minute, as we conclude this issue of 
The Carpenter, to look at the status of this "other 
fellow" and ask ourselves why he is the way he is 
and what he can do about it . . . and what we can 
do to help him get out of his tragic situation. 

Today an estimated 20 to 25 million American 
adults are living in poverty. One-fifth of all Ameri- 
can families, it has been estimated, have incomes too 
small for their basic needs! 

The poor are found in city slums, small towns, 
in sharecroppers' shacks, in migrant-worker camps, 
and on Indian reservations. 

Look again at this minority group and ask your- 
self: How many belong to labor unions? How many 
are represented at bargaining tables by men and 
women who fight for better wages for them? The an- 
swer is: only a few. . . very, very few. How many 
stand alone before oppressive employers, loan sharks, 
and dispassionate public officials and fight their battles 
unaided? 

A major goal of President Johnson's War on 
Poverty is jobs for the unemployed, particularly the 
unskilled school dropouts, the marginal farmers in 
Appalachia, and the vagrants on the streets of New 
York, Chicago, and other cities. 

Organized labor has a solemn obligation to see 
that these people who will benefit from a Federal 



program of economic aid gain union representation 
in the jobs they eventually obtain. 

Unions are the hope for millions of low-paid 
workers in fields and factories. We must step up 
our organizing efforts in the United States and Canada 
so that every eligible American may share the wealth 
of our growing, prosperous society. 

Many employers across this land have demanded 
that workers stay out of unions because "unorganized 
breadwinners will work longer hours for less pay under 
worse conditions of labor than those who are organ- 
ized." Such a statement was made recently by Catholic 
Archibishop Robert E. Lucey of San Antonio, Texas, 
speaking at the National Conference on Poverty in the 
Southwest. The clergyman urged labor to step up its 
organizing efforts even in the face of an anti-union at- 
mosphere, such as prevails in many of the so-called 
"right-to-work" states. 

Organized labor must continue to press for repeal of 
state "right-to-work" laws, which deny adequate union 
representation to workers. 

Meanwhile, every union member must join in the 
massive effort now being made in Washington to gain 
repeal of Section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Law, 
which makes these state "right-to-work" laws possible. 
A letter to your Congressman calling for repeal of this 
section of the law would go a long way toward helping 
the cause. 

The AFL-CIO has called 14(b) "an unwarranted 
intrusion on the right of organized workers and their 
employers to negotiate acceptable agreements." 

Repeal of 14(b) would bring new life into the labor 
movement and help us to get on with the job of bring- 
ing union hope and security to those now in poverty 
and despair. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



OFFICIAL 
INFORMATION 




GENERAL OFFICERS OF: 



GENERAL OFFICE: 



THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 101 Constitution Ave., N.w 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave.. N.W.. 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Finlay C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave.. N.W.. 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



second general vice president 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W.. 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave.. N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Terzick 
101 Constitution Ave.. N.W.. 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



First District. Charles Johnson, Jr. 

1 1 1 E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 

Third District, Harry Schwarzer 
16678 State Road, North Royalton, Ohio 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd.. S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fifth District. Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16. Minn. 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 10, Mo. 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 

1126 American Bank Bldg., 

621 S. W. Morrison St., Portland 5, Ore. 

Eighth District, Patrick Hogan 
8564 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 7, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12. B. C. 



M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



WE NEED YOUR 

LOCAL UNION 

NUMBER 

Because we are chang- 
ing over our mail list to 
our new computer, it is 
impossible for us to add, 
subtract, or change an 
address if we do not have 
your Local Union num- 
ber. Therefore, if you 
want your name added to 
the mail list of the jour- 
nal, or if you want it 
taken off, or if you want 
your address changed, 
please include your Local 
Union No. in your re- 
quest. Thank you for 
your cooperation. 

PETER TERZICK 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 



NAME 



Local # 



OLD ADDRESS 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



City 



NEW ADDRESS 



Zone 



State 



-Local # 



City 



State 



Zip Code Number 



PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
]01 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

BE SURE TO WRITE IN YOUR LOCAL UNION NUMBER 




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SIMPLE CARE 



PREVENTS SERIOUS CALAMITY 



THE 



(^SLprjGnTF 




VOLUME LXXXV 



No. 4 



APRIL, 1965 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Acting Editor 



SlABOR PBESsfc, 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Repeal of Section 14(b) Will Remove Blight 

Action on Construction-Site Picketing 

The Challenge of Vista 

Old-Time Tools Cumbersome? 

Income Tax Humor 

Home Study Course to Start in May 

A Carpenter of Nazareth Special Easter Feature 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 

Editorials 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 

Canadian Section 

We Congratulate 

What's New? 

In Memoriam 

Plane Gossip 

Local Union News 

Lakeland News 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 

Official Information Inside Back Cover 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N. E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20<t in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

April, the first full month of 
spring, comes from the Latin word 
aperire, "to open." In terms of the 
seasons, this month represents that 
time of the year when the trees and 
flowers begin "to open." One of 
the most beautiful signs of spring 
is the blossoming of fruit trees. 

The pear, being one of the most 
important temperate zone fruits, 
blooms early in the spring. It is ex- 
ceeded in world-wide importance 
only by the apple, surpassing in 
total production such fruits as 
peaches, plums and cherries. In the 
United States, production averages 
about 30,000,000 bushels, or from 
1/5 to 1/6 of the apple production. 

The principal centers of pear pro- 
duction in the U.S. are in Cali- 
fornia, Oregon and Washington. 
These three states produce about 
2/3 of the United States crop. In 
the east, New York and Michigan 
lead in pear production. 

The cultivation of the pear dates 
back to the pre-Christian era. It 
was brought to the New World by 
the English and other north Euro- 
peans as soon as the colonies were 
established. Today, about 1,000 
varieties are grown in the United 
States, adding beauty to the spring- 
time landscape. 





must pay his fair share. 

By law, a union recognized as bar- 
gaining agent in a place of employ- 
ment must represent all employees 
and must work to promote the wel- 
fare of all employees in that place — 
including the non-union workers, the 
"free riders." But the "free riders" 
don't pay their fair share. All the 
workers should join and support the 
union which represents them in col- 
lective bargaining. Just as they all 
get benefits won at the bargaining 
table, so they must all share the re- 
sponsibilities of union membership. 

Collective bargaining will not 
work properly unless unions arc ac- 
cepted by management — unless 
there is union security. Without a 
union security guarantee in a labor- 
management contract, anti-union 
employers can coax, bribe, or intimi- 
date workers, one by one, to quit 
the union. Then they fill vacancies 
with non-union workers. 

This kind of anti-labor, anti-un- 
ion activity goes on almost invari- 



Repeal of Section 14(b) Will 
Remove a National Work Blight 



EVENTUALLY you, as a union 
member, may get into a discus- 
sion at the labor temple or the un- 
ion hall on this matter of "repealing 
Section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley 
Law." 

What's it all about? 

The Taft-Hartley Law, passed by 
Congress in 1947, permits various 
restricted forms of union security. 
But Section 14(b) of that law per- 
mits state "right-to-work" laws to 
outlaw these same forms of union 
security. This is inconsistent and 
contrary to a basic principle of our 
American legal system, the suprem- 
acy of federal law. Furthermore, 
Section 14(b) does not allow states 
to permit such forms of union secu- 
rity as the union shop. 

The union shop is a basic feature 
of free collective bargaining. It 
means security for working men and 
women and for the unions which 
they have voluntarily created. It 
stops "free riders." The union shop 



arose as a matter of necessity. It 
has survived because it represents 
the basic principles of democracy 
and justice — the people who get 
benefits from a union contract should 
support and join that union. 

In a union-organized place of em- 
ployment, wages and working condi- 
tions are set by collective bargaining 
between the management and the 
union. All workers should partici- 
pate in the collective bargaining 
process — and they cannot fully do 
so unless they are members of the 
union. Therefore, each employee 
should be required to join the union. 

This is "compulsion" only in the 
sense that a citizen of a community 
is bound to observe the rules estab- 
lished by a majority of his fellow 
residents in the community. He is 
and should be free to advocate a 
change in those rules — but whether 
the issue is school taxes or street 
lighting the citizen is bound by the 
decision of the majority, and he 



ably where "right-to-work" laws 
exist. It is aimed at destroying un- 
ions and destroying free collective 
bargaining. 

The pattern in "right-to-work" 
states shows: 

• The right to work long hours 
at low pay. 

• The right of employers to hire 
women to do the same work as men 
for less pay. 

• The right to refuse to hire or 
promote workers because of color 
of their skins or their religion. 

• The right to employ children 
at dangerous work without effective 
regulation. 

• The right to pay sub-standard 
unemployment insurance. 

• The right to pay inadequate 
compensation to workers who are 
injured on the job. 

It's no coincidence that labor 
standards are lower in "right-to- 
work" states. Unions have been the 
chief lobbyists for minimum wage 



THE CARPENTER 



laws, adequate workmen's compen- 
sation and other social legislation. 

The AFL-CIO Executive Coun- 
cil has adopted the following state- 
ment on repeal of Section 14(b) of 
the Taft-Hartley Act as provided in 
House Resolution 77 , a bill spon- 
sored by Rep. Frank Thompson of 
New Jersey in the current session 
of Congress: 

"Last November we named the 
repeal of Section 14(b) of the Taft- 
Hartley Act, which allows the states 
to outlaw union security provisions 
in labor-management contracts, as 
our No. 1 legislative objective for 
1965. 

"We reaffirm that statement to- 
day. 

"The case against 14(b), which 
opens the door to the compulsory 
open shop, rests firmly upon three 
principles — liberty, justice and the 
law. It rests upon liberty because 
the compulsory open shop — fraud- 
ulently called "right-to-work"- — de- 
nies rights to both employers, and 
workers. It denies to a majority of 
employees in a given establishment 
the right to seek the kind of contract 
they want. This is defended as 
"minority rights." The issue is not 
the rights of a minority but the will 
of a minority. 

"Under a union shop all the rights 
of every worker — the right to dis- 
sent, the right to oppose, the right 
to organize an opposition group — ■ 





The 19 states shown above in black now have the oppressive "right-to-work" laws 
permitted by Section 14(b). Passage of H.R. 77 by the 89th Congress would make 
such state laws illegal . . . with one stroke of the President's pen. 



"PROUD FATHER" 



are protected by trade union reg- 
ulations and by federal law. But a 
compulsory open shop law gives the 
will of the minority a prior place to 
the will of the majority. 

"Employers who want a union 
shop clause in their contract — and 
this number is large despite the false 
claims of "right-to-work" forces — 
are likewise denied the right to freely 
negotiate a contract of their own 
choice. 

"We call upon the Congress to 
act promptly and favorably on the 
repeal of 14(b), and we urge every 
affiliated national union, every state 
and local central body and every 
union member to join in a campaign 
to that end." 

With all of the arguments against 
right-to-work laws and with all the 
support which labor has for getting 
rid of them through repeal of Sec- 
tion 14(b), we still have a big job to 
do. Labor is being attacked by big 
business with the National Associa- 
tion of Manufacturers and the U. S. 
Chamber of Commerce leading the 
onslaught. 

Pressure is being brought against 
the White House, against Congress 
and in all sorts of ways against or- 
ganizations to get them to sway pub- 
lic opinion to retain Section 14(b). 
This is a battle on the right-to-work 
law front. The attacks are support- 
ed from the ultra-right. The propa- 
ganda machines of the right-to-work 
advocates are in high gear. Labor 



must combat the effect of these ef- 
forts. 

Labor must mobilize its forces 
and bring to bear on all fronts its 
advocacy of repeal. 

If we do not get Section 14(b) 
repealed in this session, we may 
never again find the opportunity so 
favorable or the climate for repeal 
so promising. 



What YOU Can Do 
To Help Repeal 14(b) 

As a citizen, you have the right, 
and the responsibility, to air your 
opinions on public issues. The best 
way to express yourself on 14(b) 
is by writing directly to your Sena- 
tor and Congressman in Washing- 
ton and telling them that you sup- 
port House Resolution No. 77 and 
that, as a union member and a 
working man, you resent efforts to 
undermine job security through so- 
called "right to work" laws. Ad- 
dress your letters to the particular 
legislator, care of the House or 
Senate Office Building. Washington 
25, D. C. 

Here are some other suggestions: 
Write letters to your local news- 
paper editors telling them how you 
feel about the union shop and 
union security. Call upon your lo- 
cal editors to support efforts to re- 
peal 14(b). Urge the ladies auxili- 
ary to write letters. Talk up the 
issue among your civic and frater- 
nal organizations. 



APRIL, 1965 



Action on Construction -Site 

BUILDING TRADES-INDUSTRIAL UNION AGREEMENT WOULD RESTORE RIGHT TO 



A BILL, (H.R. 6363). has been 
introduced in the House of 
Representatives by Congressman 
Frank Thompson. Jr.. of New Jersey 
which, if passed, would restore, to 
the building trades in organized la- 
bor, the right to picket an unfair 
construction site. 

The bill was introduced by Rep. 
Thompson after the Building Trades 
Department and the Industrial 
Union Department of the AFL-CIO 
reached an agreement which as- 
sured the latter that the Building 
Trades unions would not use the 
right to picket such sites as a weapon 
against IUD-affiliated unions. 

Some IUD affiliates have feared 
that BCTD unions might picket 
them if certain IUD affiliates per- 
formed in-plant construction work 
which, ordinarily, might be consid- 
ered as BCTD work. An example 
might be new or alteration construc- 
tion work on the property of some 
industry by its regular work force, 
which is organized and affiliated 
with the IUD. 

A keystone clause in the agree- 
ment, hailed as one of the most im- 
portant intra-labor pacts since rati- 
fication of the no-raiding agreement 
which led to the AFL and CIO 
merger, declares that the settlement 
does not cover any strike "which 
arises from a dispute over work as- 
signments as between AFL-CIO af- 
filiated organizations." 



The agreement was reached only 
after months of discussions. The 
statement of principles which 
emerged from the talks affirms: 

1. The trade union obligation of 
all affiliates to refuse to perform 
struck work. 

2. The trade union obligation of 
all union members to refuse, to the 
legal extent permissible, to cross the 
picket lines of another union. 

3. The resolve of the affiliates to 
refrain from any action that adverse- 
ly affects the position of a union on 
strike. 

The statement also provides a 
working arrangement to handle any 
questions or complaints which may 
arise. Those that do arise will first 
be submitted to the presidents of 
the International Unions involved 
for resolution. In the event that 
agreement is not reached, they will 
then be submitted to a committee 
composed of the president of the 
AFL-CIO and the presidents of the 
Building Trades Department and In- 
dustrial Union Department for con- 
sideration, fact-finding and a rec- 
ommendation to the parties for a 
solution designed to achieve maxi- 
mum trade union solidarity. 

This agreement "within the House 
of Labor" cleared the way for Rep. 
Thompson's latest legislative move 
to amend the Taft-Hartley Law's 
provisions which, at the present 
time, bar picketing at the site of a 



construction project when only part 
of the operation is non-union. 

Actually, there has been some 
picketing "of an informational na- 
ture" at construction projects from 
time to time and from place to place 
during the past 14 years. However, 
every individual instance of picket- 
ing has been subject to legal in- 
terpretation by judges. Libera! 
judges have allowed certain inform- 
ational picketings while, in other in- 
stances, injunctions issued by judges 
who were not so liberal have for- 
bidden picketing of any nature. In 
such instances, aggrieved unions 
have been forced to carry on pick- 
eting of construction contractors and 
sub-contractors in the vicinity of 
their own business premises, far- 
removed from the site of construc- 
tion. Such picketing is not effective 
inasmuch as the work force affected 
does not come in contact with the 
pickets. 

Passage of the Thompson Bill 
would restore to organized labor its 
traditional right to consider every 
construction job as an integral unit 
where, in the interests of labor soli- 
darity, "an injustice to one is an in- 
justice to all." 

"Situs picketing" was barred by the 
Denver Building Site Decision of the 
NLRB in 1951. The historic case 
had its beginning in 1947 when 
Doose and Lintner, a general con- 
tractor, was awarded a contract for 




LEFT: Congressman Frank Thompson, 
Jr., of New Jersey, sponsor of the Situs 
Picketing Bill now before Congress, 
seated at center rear, as he spoke to the 
recent BCTD Executive Council meeting 
in Florida. Brotherhood President Maur- 
ice Hutcheson is at right in the picture. 



RIGHT: President C. J. Haggerty of the 
Building and Construction Trades and 
President Walter Reuther of the AFL- 
CIO Industrial Union Department sign 
the historic agreement, opening the way 
to Congressional approval of H.R. 6363. 



THE CARPENTER 



Picketing 



REAT CONSTRUCTION JOB AS A UNIT 



a new building in Denver. It gave 
the subcontract for electrical work 
to Gould and Preisner, a firm with 
a 20-year record of non-union activ- 
ity. The firm's workers proved to 
be the only non-union men on the 
building site and the Building Trades 
Council of Denver picketed the job. 
All workers except the non-union 
electricians walked off the job. 
After awhile, the general contractor 
told the non-union electrical con- 
tractor to get his non-union men 
off the job so they could get the 
other, union, men to work. Gould 
and Preisner filed NLRB charges 
alleging an unfair secondary strike 
according to the provisions of the 
Taft-Hartley Law. The pertinent 
provision is contained in Section 8 
(b)(4) (A), which states: "It 
shall be an unfair labor practice 
for a labor organization ... to en- 
gage in ... a strike . . . where 
an object thereof is: (A) forcing 
or requiring ... an employer or 
other person ... to cease doing 
business with any other person . . .". 
There have been many efforts 
made to remedy the injustice 
brought about by this strained in- 
terpretation of the language of the 
Taft-Hartley Act. President Eisen- 
hower, in his message to Congress 
in 1954, pointed out that the act 
should be remedied, saying: "The 
true secondary boycott is indefens- 
ible and must not be permitted. 



89th CONGRESS TW f^ f* «"» f\ «"» 

iiSe H. R. 6363 



IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

March 16, 1065 

Mr. Thompson of New Jersey introduced (he following bill ; which was referred 

to the Committee pn Education and Labor 



A BILL 

To amend section 8(b) (4) of the National Labor Relations Act, 
as amended, with respect to strike at the sites of construction 
projects. 

1 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Bepresenta- 

2 fives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, 

3 That section 8 (h) (4) of the National Labor Relations Act, 

4 as amended, is amended by inserting before, the semicolon 

5 at the end thereof: "Provided further, That .nothing con- 

6 tained in clause (b) of this paragraph (4) shall be construed 

7 to prohibit any strike or refusal to perform services or any 
S inducement of any individual employed by any person to ■ 
9 strike or refuse to perform services at the site of the construc- 

10 tion, alteration, painting, or repair of a. building, structure, 



A reproduction of the opening page of the brief, four-page bill intro- 
duced last month by New Jersey Congressman Frank Thompson, Jr. 




The Act must not, however, pro- 
hibit legitimate concerted activities 
against other than innocent parties. 
I recommend that the Act be clari- 
fied by making it explicit that con- 
certed action against ... an em- 
ployer on a construction project, 
who together with other employers, 
is engaged in work on the site of 
the project, will not be treated as 
a secondary boycott." The Senate 
Labor Committee ruled favorably 
on a bill to carry out President 
Eisenhower's recommendation but 
it was bottled up by the House La- 
bor Committee. Another bill was in- 
troduced in 1955 but neither house 
acted. Eisenhower, never consid- 
ered as a wild-eyed liberal, repeated 
his recommendation in his 1958 
Message to Congress and still again 



in 1959 but nothing happened. 
Senator J. F. Kennedy introduced a 
bill to amend the law in 1959 but, 
shortly thereafter, some industrial 
unions withdrew vitally-needed sup- 
port of the proposal. Rep. Thomp- 
son was a co-sponsor of the match- 
ing 1959 legislation in the House 
of Representatives. This measure 
died and Rep. Thompson introduced 
legislation again in 1961. Again, it 
died. 

Now, with the unified support of 
organized labor, it is hoped that the 
long legislative history of the pro- 
posal to amend the Taft-Hartley 
Law will be successfully completed 
and the same right of picketing 
which is available to non-building 
unions will again rightfully be 
available to construction workers. 



APRIL, 1965 




ECONOMIC 
OPPORTUNITY 
IN THE WAR 




L# ■ ■ f^k Mm Lb EL IM Lsi EL 



VISTA 



5,000 volunteers to work in poverty areas this year- 



be helping others to help themselves 
— but in Appalachia instead of 
Afghanistan, in Harlem instead of 
Kenya. The challenge in some ways 
is bigger than that of the Peace 
Corps." 

What does it take to be a VISTA 
Volunteer? "The basic requirement," 
said Ferguson, "is that you care 
about poor people — enough to share 
their life and try to help them." 
VISTA Volunteers will live and 
work among the people they are 
helping. It may be on an Indian 
reservation in the Southwest or in 
an urban slum in the Northeast. 
It may be in a rural area or small 
town, a migrant laborer camp, in 
institutions for the physically handi- 
capped and the mentally ill. Volun- 
teers will go wherever there is need 
to help those living in conditions of 
poverty of the mind as well as of 
the body. 



' ONG HOURS, low pay, poor 
-^ conditions, difficult surround- 
ings — that's a partial description of 
a job offering special fringe benefits 
to particular Americans. 

VISTA — Volunteers In Service 
To America — is seeking qualified 
men and women over 18 who are 
willing to give a year of their talents 
and energies to the war against pov- 
erty. The response throughout the 
Nation to the Peace Corps has dra- 
matically demonstrated the intensity 
of the spirit of service in this coun- 
try. One of the major anti-poverty 
programs established by the Eco- 
nomic Opportunity Act of 1964, 
VISTA offers Americans the chance 
for service at home. 

Glenn Ferguson, formerly a Peace 
Corps official and now Director of 
VISTA, said, "Like the Peace Corps 
Volunteers, VISTA Volunteers will 



THE UNSEEN POOR 

Today we face a new kind of 
poverty — one not simply of dire 
need. It used to be that we could 
see the poor in threadbare clothing 
on street corners, and breadlines 
everywhere. Today, living away from 
highways or isolated in an urban 
ghetto, the poor are unseen and al- 
most forgotten. If the American 



economy can be compared to a 20- 
story luxury apartment house where 
even the ground floor tenants share 
the comforts, one-fifth of the popu- 
lation lives hidden away in a sub- 
basement. This unseen America con- 
stitutes nearly 35 million people. 

Today's poor are a mixed group. 
Some are the children of poverty, 
some are unemployed and with no 
job in sight because of industrial 
change, some are rural families, some 
have been blacklisted because they 
belong to a minority group, some 
are aged, some lack housing and 
other necessities. 

These poor are caught in a vicious 
cycle of inadequate education, in- 
adequate homes, inadequate jobs, 
and stunted ambitions — all handed 
down from generation to generation. 
To break this cycle, VISTA Volun- 
teers will work not merely to allevi- 
ate need, but to eliminate poverty. 

The task will not be easy. It will 
require Volunteers with spirit, ability 
and determination. The challenge 
facing the VISTA Volunteer is lim- 
ited only by his initiative and creativ- 
ity. It will be a full-time job and 
a 24-hour commitment. In order to 
understand the poor people with 
whom they work and in order to 
create understanding, as well as 



THE CARPENTER 



Typical young men engaged in a six-week VISTA pilot project at the University of Pennsylvania. Taken from 
the streets of Philadelphia, 100 men were led by future volunteers in classes and off-campus work projects. 




stand ready at all times to carry their 
work further, VISTA Volunteers are 
not likely to work set hours. 

ONE YEAR OF SERVICE 

Volunteers will serve for one year 
including a four to six week train- 
ing period in the environment of 
poverty. Married couples are also 
eligible if husband and wife submit 
applications together and if there 
are no dependents under 18 years 
of age. There are no educational 
requirements for VISTA. While in 
training and service, Volunteers re- 
ceive living expenses, including 
travel and health care. Upon com- 
pletion of service, they receive a 
stipend of $50 for each month 
served. 

Volunteers have already been as- 
signed to projects in 28 communities 
across the nation and will move there 
as quickly as training is completed. 
Training involves a close-up look at 
poverty in which the Volunteer is 
placed in a poverty environment 
similar to the one in which he will 
be assigned. Any community that 
girds itself to fight poverty can call 
upon VISTA for the services of its 
Volunteers. 

After selection and training, Vol- 
unteers may be assigned to any of 



the fifty States, the District of Co- 
lumbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Is- 
lands, Guam, American Samoa, and 
the Trust Territory of the Pacific 
Islands. They may express a pre- 
ference for their area of assignment. 

A wide variety of skills ranges 
from nurse to teacher, craftsman to 
skills of small business management, 
and practical experience in the 
home arts. The first 20 Volunteers 
included three married couples, sev- 
eral retirees, college students, and 
people with varying occupational ex- 
perience. VISTA will seek to place 
5,000 Volunteers in poverty areas 
during 1965. 

While living in a poverty area, 
VISTA Volunteers may work on one 
or more of a variety of tasks with 
youth groups, elderly persons, per- 
sons who do not speak English, very 
young children, physically handi- 
capped; as a tutor, as a recreation 
leader, providing knowledge of exist- 
ing service agencies so families might 
use them. 

EXPLORE NEW FIELDS 

VISTA Volunteers will expand 
other services already in existence 
and provide new ones. They will 
explore new fields, devise new meth- 
ods and help develop new programs 
for combating poverty. They will 



not be policy-makers or program 
creators, but will serve at the request 
of local groups, carrying out locally 
conceived and directed programs as 
supplementary workers. 

Many areas need leaders who 
have the strength to maintain integ- 
rity in the midst of anguish, to com- 
municate hope in the midst of en- 
gulfing circumstances. The Volun- 
teer's presence will often be just what 
is needed to balance the scales for 
the weak. 

In welcoming the first VISTA 
Volunteers, President Lyndon B. 
Johnson said, "The initials of your 
organization spell VISTA. It is 
an appropriate name, for you will 
be opening up new vistas of hope 
for the poor, achievement for your- 
self, greatness for your Nation, the 
Nation you serve." 

VISTA is opportunity — for you 
it can be the opportunity to serve; 
for the less-fortunate, the opportu- 
nity to learn to work to live in 
decency and dignity. 

If you are interested in actively 
participating in the war against pov- 
erty, write to: 

VISTA 

Office of Economic Opportunity 
Washington, D. C. 20506 



APRIL, 1965 



Old-Time Tools Cumbersome? 
Not At All, Says This Member 





|HE quality and usefulness of old-time tools can be 
attested to by Brother Charles Jenkins of Local 362 in 
Pueblo, Colorado, who enjoys cleaning, repairing and 
using the tools shown in these photos. Jenkins told us 
that "some people think that they would be -cumber- 
some and unsuited for use today, but this is not the 
case at all." 

Having acquired his collection from his father, 
friends and from discard heaps, he has hopes of lo- 
cating a wooden brace and a wooden screw box and 
die for making the screws for adjustable planes. 



PHOTO ONE — Charles Jenkins and part of his collection. 
Top row, from the left: three marking gauges, measuring 
wheel, and two wooden mallets, with a hand wrought screw 
driver in between. Middle row displays different weight plumh 
bobs. On the bottom row is a brass bound sliding-T bevel 
square; hand-forged bits and 2-inch spoon bits; folding 2- 
inch rule and carpenter's awl; and a brass-bound try square. 



PHOTO TWO — At the top is a dowel pointer and a hollow 
auger by A. A. Woods, 1887. It is adjustable from V4" to 
1V4" to make any size dowel. Also in picture are: broad axe, 
two augers and handles, two wooden mallets, two 4" adzes by 
L&IJ White, 1887, and in the foreground is a mitre knife by 
V. R. Fox, 1879. 



PHOTO THREE — A group of wooden plow planes, with ad- 
justing screws of wood. Several were made by Alex Mathie- 
son and Sons in Glascow, Scotland. Production of these tools 
stopped before 1880. The two, in the foreground, are 
matching planes for tongue and groove, to make all kinds of 
tongue and groove, including flooring. 



PHOTO FOUR — Back row: various shapes of wooden mold- 
ing and sash planes. Middle row: two gaining planes V2" and 
% ". Front row, from the left: pony draw knife, four boxwood 
spoke shaves and a folding-handle draw knife. 




PHOTO FIVE — Front row, from the left: flat-bottom radius 
plane and a convex-bottom radius plane. Back row: a set of 
wooden hand planes 9" to 28". These planes have irons 
which are about three times as thick as modern plane irons. 
They eliminate chatter and produce a fine finish. 



8 



THE CARPENTER 




Washington ROUNDUP 



PATERNALISM took a setback in a recent National Labor Relations Board decision. 
An NLRB examiner ruled that a father who advised his son not to join a union was 
guilty of unfair labor practices. The father was a foreman in a plant where his 
son was employed, and the union was conducting an organizing drive among the 
employees. 

THERE'S ANOTHER ANGLE to the "Medicare" issue now being discussed on Capitol 
Hill: Hospitals are notoriously low-pay employers. Many hospital workers get 
less than the $1.25 minimum wage. Several unions have been trying to boost the 
wages of such workers, but organizing has been slow. Some lobbyists now suggest 
that higher pay in hospitals might make a stiffer "Medicare" tax necessary to 
cover the increased "labor costs." 

IN THE NEXT SIX YEARS the U. S. labor force will increase by nine million, number- 
ing 86 million, the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the Department of Labor esti- 
mates. A large increase is also projected for the decade 1970 to 1980, possibly 
another 15 million persons. This would raise the total labor force to 101 
million. These summary estimates are from an article, "Projections of the Labor 
Force 1970-80," in the February Monthly Labor Review. They are based on the 
latest population projections of the Bureau of the Census and assume the con- 
tinuation of postwar trends in social and demographic factors affecting labor 
force activity, such as increasing length of schooling, greater proportions of 
women working outside the home, and earlier retirement. 

PROFITS ARE FEW among Federal government agencies. Many operate in the red, de- 
pending upon Congressional appropriations to keep them functioning at full steam. 
An exception is the U.S. Passport Office, which turned back to the Treasury a 
profit of $4,850,000 last year — a 129 percent return on the taxpayers' investment! 

SELF-SUFFICIENT CARRIER— The nuclear -powered aircraft carrier, Enterprise, largest 
ship in the world, has traveled nearly 35,000 miles at an average of 22 knots 
without refueling along the way, the Navy Department reports. 

AFL-CIO PRESIDENT GEORGE MEANY had strong praise for the creation of a new Japan 
Confederation of Labor, to be affiliated with the International Confederation of 
Free Trade Unions. "Viewed in the light of the tense world situation," Meany 
said, "it is most urgent for Japanese workers to build a united and democratic 
strong trade union movement — a movement dedicated solely to promoting social 
justice, freedom and peace." The new Federation will number almost 2,000,000 and 
is expected to act as a powerful counterpoise to the leftist-led General Council 
of Japanese Trade Unions. 

THE COST OF MEDICAL CARE has risen 17 percent between 1958 and 1963, according to 
the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Price Indices. This compares with an 
average increase over the period of 6 percent for all items in the family budget. 
Medical care topped all other expenses, with hospital costs soaring to a startling 
38 percent. The average patient cost per day in voluntary short-term general 
hospitals increased from $29.24 in 1958 to $39.87 in 1963. The average cost per 
stay in the hospital rose from $214.85 to $299.61 in the same period. 



APRIL, 1965 



E TAX HUMOR 




-TjTarB»ivw«j>« 




That No. 7040 is No Joke! 



Your Friendly Internal Revenue 
Man, who separates you from your 
money with a Form 1040 every April, 
prefers for you to consider him as 
Just Another Citizen ... a genial, 
neighhorly-type human being. 

To this end, these earnest public 
servants have issued a Press Release 
entitled, "Taxpayer Education and In- 
formation Material. Topic: Anecdotes." 
All these whimsies are properly in- 
dexed and crossfiled with true bureau- 
cratic efficiency. 

What this is supposed to do is to 
start you to thinking of the IRS man 
as a Friendly Fellow. Soon, while 
you're shedding bitter salt tears over 
the pelf they've removed from your 
old bankroll, you find yourself feel- 
ing sorry for them because theirs is 
such a dirty, unsavory job. 




The governmental phraseology (la- 
belled 'gobbledegook' by Texas Con- 
gressman Maury Maverick 30 years 
ago) of the IRS sometimes is a bit far- 
out for taxpayers. The IRS man who 
needed more information on the sale 
of a second-hand truck, wrote the 
taxpayer: "Please advise as to the 
disposition of this truck." Came the 
answer: "If that truck has a disposi- 
tion, it was mean and ornery." Boffo? 



Consider Item A-65-1. It tells the 
story of the IRS office which had a 
telephone number almost identical 
with a popular cleaning firm. The 
IRS phone rang and a voice inquired: 
"Is this the cleaners?" "Well," ad- 
mitted the agent who answered, "some 
people think we are!" Ha ha ha. 

Or how about A-65-29. . . . The 
IRS agent on his way to lunch heard 
one departing "customer" say to an- 
other: "Well, that didn't hurt a bit!" 
An arriving victim was heard to mut- 
ter: "They must be using novacain!" 
Chuckle? 

Humorous item No. A-65-20 tells 
about the taxpayer who reported to 
the agent interviewing him that he 
had no gross income. 

"Why not?" asked the puzzled IRS 
man. Said the taxpayer: "Only NET 
income . . . I'm in the fish business!" 

A-65-26 is pretty good. A tavern 
owner insisted that his automobile 
operating expenses were legitimate 
business deductions for Federal in- 
come tax purposes. "How else," he 
asked, "can I get the drunks home?" 

Conscience-ridden taxpayers will 
possibly titter self-consciously over 
A-65-1 1. It seems that one Sunday, 
shortly after the April 15 deadline, an 
unusual envelope was found in the 
collection basket of a church. Inside 
was $60 in currency and the follow- 
ing note: 

"My conscience bothers me. Keep 
$10 for the church. The $50 is for 
my federal income tax." The church 
dutifully did what the anonymous 
member requested. In another similar 
instance, a note was sent directly to the 
collector, enclosed money and said: 
"I haven't been able to sleep since I 
cheated on my, return. I am sending 
this now. If I still can't sleep, I'll send 
the rest." 

The IRS thinks that the taxpayer 
who asked, "Can Siamese twins file 



joint returns?" was suffering from a 
split personality. (That's No. A-65-5). 

Really considerate was the JRS of- 
fice which assisted taxpayers in its 
first aid room. Oldsters in Washing- 
ton remember when the assistance 
office was in Room 1040. Cute? 

The taxpayer described in Anecdote 
No. A-65-9 asked: "Do I have to 
report the value of meals and lodging 
while I was in jail?" 

The IRS boys report as true this 
story: A taxpayer recently received, 
through error, duplicate refund checks 
and called the local office for instruc- 
tions. She was told: "Take the num- 
ber off one of the checks and mail 
it in." Yup, you guessed it; the IRS 
office soon received the number, neatly 
snipped from the check! 




Some of the larger Internal Reve- 
nue offices insist that all employes 
who meet the public wear coats and 
ties. During a busy day of taxpayer 
assistance, an efficient supervisor be- 
rated a young man he saw in shirt- 
sleeves. "You know you are required 
to wear a coat!" he said. The young 
man, startled, sheepishly left the room 
and returned a bit later with suitcoat, 
topcoat and hat ... he was a tax- 
payer determined to get the assistance 
he needed! 



10 



THE CARPENTER 




EDITORIALS 



* TAXATION REPRESENTATION 

"Frequently what is legally right is morally wrong" 
commented Congressman Thomas M. Pelly of Wash- 
ington in regard to a recent instance where the In- 
ternal Revenue Service impounded the bank account 
of a Seattle hotel. Many pay checks to employes were 
still outstanding and could not be cashed when the 
IRS acted in connection with a tax delinquency suit. 
Some of the workers lost from two to four weeks' 
wages, earned vacations and other fringe benefits, un- 
til the matter was settled. 

Congressman Pelly has introduced legislation to 
amend the Internal Revenue Code to exempt, from 
any such levy against management, sufficient funds 
necessary to satisfy liabilities to employes. 

Such action as the IRS took is legal now, but Con- 
gressman Pelly believes that the rights of the workers 
should be satisfied before the rights of the tax col- 
lectors. 

So do we. 

* TEETOTALING CARPENTERS 

We were gratified to see the results of a recent sur- 
vey of drinkers and drinking habits which was re- 
ported in the nation's press. A team of samplers from 
New Brunswick, N. J., came up with some startling 
results. Carpenters, it would appear, are one of the 
most temperate groups in the nation so far as alco- 
holic beverages are concerned. 

During the past 18 years, according to the survey, 
drinking has risen 4 per cent among men and 7 per 
cent among women. The samplers found out that 100 
per cent of the lawyers, dentists and doctors whom 
they interviewed drank, as did the same number of 
judges. Scientists, engineers and college professors 
ranked second at 87 per cent. Carpenters and our 
fellow-workers in the building trades, painters, ranked 
lowest at 67 per cent. 

Regardless of personal opinions regarding the ad- 
visability of drinking, any sensible person will agree 
that excessive drinking by carpenters and others who 
must be subjected to hazards on the job is not a de- 
sirable factor. The man who reports on the job-site 
suffering from a hangover is not a good accident risk. 

Much excessive drinking can be traced to frustra- 



tion and insecurity. We like to think that the improve- 
ment in wages, hours and working conditions which 
has stemmed from the continuous efforts of this Broth- 
erhood and other segments of organized labor has had 
a part in bettering the lives of countless thousands who 
do not have to resort to alcohol in an effort to drown 
their troubles in drink. 

* HYBRID TREES AND TIMBER 

The need for increased activity in improving the 
per-acre yield of America's forest lands has been 
cited by Dr. Sherret S. Chase, research geneticist of 
DeKalb, 111. The scientist points out that, by genetic 
means alone, corn production in the U. S. has been 
raised from an average of 22 bushels per acre to 66, 
thus reducing the required acreage for corn produc- 
tion by a third. Unless something is done to increase 
the per-acre yield of timberlands, there is going to be 
immense pressures exerted to cut timber from any and 
all timberlands in order to meet the projected needs 
for lumber. There will be a conflict between the con- 
servationists and the commercial lumbermen. 

America needs its forests and it also needs the 
products thereof for paper and building needs. Some 
way must be found to provide both. Perhaps Dr. 
Chase's ideas should be thoroughly explored by those 
who are responsible for our long-range planning in 
regard to conservation and timber supply. 

* AMBASSADORS FROM LABOR 

The appointment of more labor leaders to posts in 
the State Department's diplomatic corps has been 
recommended to the government by Senator Thomas 
J. Dodd of Connecticut. 

The senator says, truly, that labor leaders know 
more about the problems of the common people in 
many of the newly-emerging nations of the world and 
that they would, as a result, be of value to the nation 
in such capacities where they would represent the 
U. S. in dealing with such people. 

American labor leaders would bring a greater 
understanding of the social and economic problems 
facing other nations, particularly the "emerging na- 
tions" of the world. Diplomats will find them worthy 
adversaries of any communistic representatives they 
might encounter. 



APRIL, 1965 



11 



HOME 

STUDY COURSE 

TO START 

IN MAY 




First course offered will be mathematics. To follow will 
be courses in blueprint reading, estimating, and layout. 



BEGINNING in the May issue of 
The Carpenter, our Brother- 
hood will start a series of Home 
Study courses to enable both jour- 
neymen and apprentices to upgrade 
their knowledge of the trade. 

Considerable interest in such 
courses has been expressed by many 
members. Several months ago a 
questionnaire published in the jour- 
nal elicited hundreds of responses. 

As a result of this interest, the Ap- 
prenticeship Committee is prepar- 
ing Home Study Courses in mathe- 
matics, blueprint reading, estimating, 
and layout. 

Since a good grounding in mathe- 
matics is essential to all upgrading 
of skills, the first course offered will 
be mathematics. Furthermore, most 
members filling in the questionnaire 
expressed an interest in such a 
course. 

There will be no charge for the 
course and those interested in tak- 
ing it will be able to proceed at their 
own pace. 

The first lesson will start with 
basic addition, subtraction and di- 
vision. As these are mastered, the 
course will take the member into the 
fundamentals of algebra and trig- 
onometry by easy stages. 

While the first lesson or two may 
be elementary to many members, 
they will afford the man deficient in 
math an opportunity to achieve a 



solid groundwork for progressing in- 
to more complicated mathematics. 

At the conclusion of the math 
course, one of the other subjects — 
blueprint reading, layout, estimating 
— will be taken up. 

Every member following the trade 
knows that construction is becoming 
more complicated year by year, and 
the man who expects to keep stead- 



ily employed or move on to super- 
visory status needs to have a greater 
range of knowledge. These courses 
will offer our members an oppor- 
tunity to enhance their skills effec- 
tively and without any cost. 

If you are interested in making 
yourself a more efficient tradesman, 
this will be your opportunity to 
achieve your goal. 



DON'T OVERLOOK OUR 
MANY TRAINING AIDS 



TS your Apprenticeship Program 
■*■ making use of the many aids de- 
veloped by the General Office and 
the National Joint Apprenticeship 
and Training Committee? If not, a 
good bet is being passed up. 

All these aids are the products of 
a good deal of time and effort put 
forth by the National Committee. 
They are designed to provide an ef- 
fective method of selecting appren- 
tices, maintaining records and in- 
suring proper training. 

Included in these aids is a 
brochure on apprenticeship stand- 
ards for carpenters and joiners. 
There is a set of standards for mill 
and cabinet making. There is also 
one for millwrights. Recently, a 
set of standards has also been de- 



veloped for the piledrivers' trainee 
program. 

In addition, there are two manu- 
als which contain many suggestions 
and tips for making an apprentice- 
ship program orderly and efficient. 
One is "A Manual of Suggestions 
and Information." The other is 
"Qualifying Test for Apprenticeship 
and Trainee Applicants." Both of 
these can be extremely useful in in- 
suring proper selection and training 
of men entering the apprenticeship 
program. 

There is no charge for any of the 
aids, except the "Qualifying Test for 
Apprenticeship and Trainee Appli- 
cants," which sells for fifteen cents. 
All of these brochures are available 
only to apprenticeship committee 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



members and should be ordered 
through the Local Union or District 
Council. 

For your information, here once 
more are the apprenticeship items 
now available: 

o Apprenticeship Standards for 
Carpenters and Joiners 

• Apprenticeship Standards jot- 
Mill and Cabinet Making 

• Apprenticeship Standards for 
Millwrights 

• National Standards for Pile- 
drivers' Trainee Program 

• A Manual of Suggestions and 
Information 

• Qualifying Test for Appren- 
ticeship and Trainee Applicants 
(15c) 

Nebraska Resolution 
Promotes Lumber Use 

Since all carpenters are interested in 
wood building products for durability, 
long life, and beautiful buildings — both 
homes and commercial — a resolution was 
recently passed at the 27th annual con- 
vention of the Nebraska State Council of 
Carpenters. It was presented by the 
Council's Promotion of Lumber Commit- 
tee and it said in part: 

"BE IT RESOLVED that through this 
Brotherhood, the lumber industry from 
the beginning of the tree to the finished 
products in the home and our industrial 
building, be promoted as to the use of 
wood through tree planting, tree cutting, 
saw mills, by-products of wood, lumber 
dealers, and architects, and all concerns 
involved in the use of wood.' 

"BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that 
the Nebraska State Council of Carpen- 
ters go on record, through the above men- 
tioned industries and concerns, to pro- 
mote the use of wood to the highest de- 
gree.' 

"This committee recognizing the need 
of further promotion of lumber in the 
construction field recommends that this 
State Council of Carpenters assist the 
General Office and material dealers in the 
further promotion of the use of wood. 
Contractors and the architects should be 
contacted and urged to use the natural 
resources of our country. Each local un- 
ion shall be advised of the action of this 
convention and be instructed to promote 
this program in its jurisdictional area." 

Setting Door Bucks 

A suggestion for setting steel door 
bucks has been sent in by Tom Monaghan 
of Local 1856 in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

"Use a magnet strong enough to hold 
a plumb bob on magnet. This saves time 
and is more accurate than level or plumb 
rule." 




These 

FREE BLUE PRINTS 

have started thousands toward 

BETTER PAY AND PROMOTION 



That's right! In all fifty states, men who 
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Name— 



.Age. 



City_ 



JZone State- 



Occupation. 



APRIL, 1965 



13 




By 



FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Brother Goetz at 0216 S.W. Iowa Street, Portland, Ore. 97201 



Kitchen-door Catfish 




Brother Menschel and lunker 

Mrs. H. L. Menschel of 206 Ash St., 
Watseka. Illinois, says husband Hugo is 
an avid angler and stalks his finny game 
the light and easy method. She sends in 
the above photograph of Hugo with a 
moose of a catfish he nipped about a 
stone's throw from the kitchen door, near 
their cabin on Kean's Bay. Lake Shafer, 
Monticello, Indiana. It was beached on 
an 8-pound test spin line! Hugo is a 
member of Local 496 out of Kankakee, 
Illinois. 

Check-list for fishermen 

With the fishing season near at hand; 
already started in some areas; here's a 
suggested list of things to do before 
sauntering off to stream, lake or salt- 
chuck: 

POINTS ... A week before the sea- 
son opens, be especially kind and con- 



siderate to your wife. Fix that loose picket 
in the fence; putty the loose window 
pane: fix the leaky faucet; replace the 
dying tube in the TV — and buy her an- 
other bottle of clear nail polish. 

RODS . . . Wipe down glass rods with 
damp cloth, then apply a coat or two of 
clear nail polish to the guide wraps. 
Replace those wraps that are slightly 
frayed. Check for loose ferrules. A 
loose ferrule can snap a rod in two. 
Make sure the guides and tips are free 
of nicks or abrasions. Replace them if 
needed. A nicked guide can ruin a line 
and lose a lunker. 

REELS . . . Reels left idle since last 
summer should be given a liberal dose of 
oil as last year's oil may have evaporated. 
Reels, pocked from salt water corrosion, 
should be taken apart; soaked and 
scrubbed in a hot, soapy-water solution, 
then wiped clean with an oil-soaked rag. 

TERMINAL GEAR . . . Shine up 
those spinners and wobblers: re-paint 
those faded bass lures; finish off the job 
with a coating of clear nail polish. Check 
your supply of snaps, swivels, rings, etc. 

HOOKS . . . Set aside a good supply 
of fish hooks, honing them to needle- 
point sharpness. 

WADERS or BOOTS . . . Check for 
leaks. A leaky boot, the first minute of 
opening day, can chill the enthusiasm of 
the most ardent. 

FLIES . . . Fill out your missing pat- 
terns and give those bedraggled specimens 
a new lease on life by holding them over 
the spout of a steaming tea kettle for a 
minute. 

Home-Made Beacon 

A candle set in dirt in the bottom of a 
white paper bag with holes punched in 
its lower portion will provide an emer- 
gency "beacon" for anglers returning at 
night. Put one at the mouth of the creek 
you've got to turn off into. 

Rings Tell Sturgeon's Age 




pectoral fins. The following comparative, 
length-to-age chart was arrived at using 
the above method: 

7 ft., 9 ill 32 years old 

8 ft., 6 in 42 years old 

1 ft 50 years old 

From the above chart il can readily 
he seen that the sturgeon is a slow grow- 
ing animal and rigid protection must be 
mainiaincd if extinction is to be averted. 



Outdoor News Notes 




Biologists determine the age of stur- 
geon by counting growth rings on the 



Brothers Miller and Loveridge 

News from that outdoor — loving mem- 
bership: 

. . . "Come a nice warm day in June, 
try the crystal clear waters of Strawberry 
Lake for trout." That is the advice from 
Mrs. Jack Miller of Provo. Utah, a 
member of the Ladies Auxiliary. Local 
455. She sends in the picture above 
to back up her contention: Husband Jack 
Miller and Don Loveridge, both mem- 
bers of the Carpenters' Union. Local 
1498, with a stringer from "Strawberry." 
(Mrs. Loveridge is also a member of the 
Ladies Auxiliary, Local 455.) 

. . . Alva Burgess of Crossville, Ten- 
nessee, a member of Local 1993, says the 
youngsters find Obed River in the Cum- 
berland Mountains area lucrative for rock 
bass and smallmouth bass. Son Joe and 
his friend, Herman Hawn, nipped 30 of 
the finsters on a past morning junket 
using Abu Reflex lures. 

. . . Mike Hecimovich of St. Paul, 
Minnesota, a member of Local 596, and 
his son, hit the finny jackpot on a fishing 
trip to Canada. They caught bass, wall- 
eye, pike — and a 20-pound lake trout. 
Canada's a pretty big place, fellows, come 
on, let us in on this angler's horn of 
plenty, huh? 

. . . Ben Blake, Tacoma, Washington, 
a member of Local 470, never caught 
anything larger than an eight inch trout, 
that is until he embarked on his first 
salmon fishing junket out of Westport. 
Washington. On his first saltwater jun- 
ket, he nipped three salmon which ctn- 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



junctively tipped the scales near 50 
pounds. Now I'd say that wasn't half 
bad for a beginner, would you? 

. . . Al Thornborough of Vineland, 
New Jersey, a member of Local 393, 
has built, in his spare time, an attractive 
looking tent and trailer campground 
called "Hidden Acres." It's located about 
3 miles from Exit 13 of the Garden 
State Parkway on State Highway 83, 
Claremont, New Jersey. Anglers have 
choice of ocean, bay or lake fishing. 

Holy smokes and sufferin' catfish, look 
at this bowed-in-the-middle stringer, prov- 
ing the stories we've heard about Blue 
Mountain Lake in Arkansas. Here's a 
note from Bill Medley, business agent 
for Local 71 out of Fort Smith, that 
explains the photo: 

"Dear Fred: 

"Enclosed find a photo of a fine catch 
of channel catfish — just a one-day catch. 
I would like for you to inform brother 
members of the excellent fishing we have 
in the state of Arkansas and I believe 
the enclosed photo proves my point. All 
the 'cats' were taken in Blue Mountain 
Lake which is located not far from Fort 
Smith." 




One-day catch of cats 



Claudin Rescues two dear 

Outdoor Meanderings tips the topper 
to Bill Claudlin of 10309 Woodward 
Avenue. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. We've 
heard, via the outdoor grapevine, that 
Bill and two of his hunting buddies, 
risked their necks in a successful attempt 
to rescue a pair of adult doe deer that 
had fallen through the ice this past 
winter. 

Four Deer First Day 

George G. Kline, retired, of 1704 Ir- 
vine Ave., Bemidji, Minnesota, a mem- 
ber of Local 1934 for many years, re- 
ports on a successful hunting trip this 
past season. George, his two sons, David 
and Milford, and a friend knocked down 
four deer the first morning of opening 
day in northern Minnesota, 20 miles 
northeast of Bemidji, which brings back 
a memory of the lad who tripped over 
2,000 miles past season to miss a big 
buck and found venison boiling in the pot 



when he returned home. The Missus had 
shot a chunky 4-point in the back yard! 

Record Rockfish From Surf 

Neil Cordeiro of Provincetown, Mas- 
sachusetts, checked in the largest striped 
bass ever to be taken from the surf — 
a 65 pound, 10 ounce, specimen. He 
duped it with an Atom plug, breaking 
the previous surf-caught striper record 
that stood for 26 years. 

As he was toting his lunker to the car, 
he ran into another angler who con- 
gratulated him on his catch, a fellow by 
name of Capt. Robert Gray who, coin- 
cidentally, holds a record for the second 
largest striper taken by any means — a 
68V2 pounder. 

Small world! 

Tale of a Big Brownie 

Brother Henry A. Potila of National 
Mine, Michigan, a member of Local Un- 
ion 958, sent in a photo of a chunky 
brown trout. Didn't say how much the 
finster weighed and, unfortunately, the 
print was too light for reproduction. 
Like to pass along however, Henry's catch 
information: 

"While fishing with my two sons, I 
caught a big brownie in the Escanaba 
River, Marquette County, Michigan, on 
a spinner-fly combination. The almost 
unbelievable part of the story is the fish 
had 99 minnows in its stomach. These 
minnows were all in good shape, just as 
if they had been swallowed in one whale- 
like gulp." 

Fishing Reports 

• Carpenter members out of Local 
662, Mt. Morris, New York, will recall 
Bruno Rycheck, who was initiated back 
in 1947 in that local. Brother Rycheck 
is now located in Miami, Florida, a mem- 
ber of Local 709. He recently hit the 
finny jackpot, winning an engraved plaque 
for his angling skills on bluefish, an out- 
standing catch of 30 chunky specimens 
from the saltchuck, largest of which was 
a IV2 pounder. 

• Vicki Desanti, daughter of Lee 
Desanti, Rockford, Illinois, a member of 
Local 792, had her share of beginner's 
luck on a summer junket with her dad 
to Big Green Lake out of Green Lake, 
Wisconsin. She nipped two lake trout on 
that first trip — a 4 and IV2 pounder, 
while dad came up with a SVi pound 
German Brown trout. Lee later eased a 
9Vz pound laker from the lake. 

• E. G. Holland, retired, a member 
of Local 180, Vallejo, California, is 
pushing 72 years of age but he still puts 
in lots of hours on lake and stream. Top 
catch for Brother Holland is a 39 pound 
striped bass that measured 48 inches 
from nose to tail. How's that 21 ft. 
cabin cruiser coming along, E. G.? 



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16 



Widespread Interest 
In ''Geometry Revisited 7 

The article "Carpenter Geometry Revisited," which 
appeared in the December, 1964, issue of The Carpen- 
ter, was received enthusiastically by many of our readers. 
The mathematics chairman of the Sioux City Public 
Schools, Nebraska, was one of many readers who stated 
that "trisecting an angle purely by geometric means — 
compasses and a straight edge — is impossible." Several 
suggested solutions were sent in to us concerning this 
theoretically impossible task. Unfortunately, we cannot 
print the proposed solutions as there were too many. 
However, the following were among the individuals who 
wrote us about the problem: 

James Niederle, Local 1750, Cleveland, Ohio; M. W. 
Leemcreise, Local 366. Bronx, New York; Joseph Ober- 
hausen, Local 64, Louisville. Kentucky; Gary Sexton, 
Retail Clerks Local 324 in Redondo Beach, California; 
Alan Belisle, Fridley, Minnesota; Thomas Steiningcr, 
Clarkston. Washington: Leonard Wills, Jr., Bergcnfiekl, 
New Jersey; Robert C. Greenwood, M.D. (neurological 
surgeon), San Diego. California; Frank M. Ulbert, Hotel, 
Restaurant and Bartenders International Union Local 1 10. 
San Francisco, California; and Roy W. Paulson, Berkeley, 
California. 

To all these and others, we wish to thank you for your 
interest in this subject. 

Millwrights? Millmen? 
Our Printer Should Know 

The March issue of The Carpenter published on 
Page 18 four pictures of a completed woodworking job 
at the Liberty National Bank and Trust Company, Orch- 
ard Park, N. Y. The work was performed by members 
of Local 1401, Buffalo, N. Y., who are employed by 
D. C. Brunner Co.. Inc., of Buffalo. 

The story started out well. It went to our printers with 
a headline: "New York Bank Displays Millmen's Skills." 
It was made up into a page that way. 

But, somehow, in the final version which went to press 
a proofreader changed '"millmen" to "millwrights," and 
the millmen of Local 1401 found themselves with a new 
classification. 

To compound the error, the D. C. Brunner Co. wound 
up with an ""n" missing, as "Bruner." 

Our sincere apologies to the millmen of the D. C. 
Brunner Company. We'd ask the proofreader to write 
an essay on the difference between millwrights and mill- 
men, but a judge in the District of Columbia has just 
ruled that essay writing cannot be made a form of punish- 
ment!— THE EDITOR. 

Boss Gloves Unfair, 
As We Go to Press 

The Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America is 
involved in strikes totalling 600 employees at three plants 
of the Boss Manufacturing Company — one of the nation's 
largest manufacturers and suppliers of work and indus- 
trial gloves. The three struck plants are located at Oneida. 
Tenn. (struck December 1st); Kewanee, 111. (struck Janu- 
ary 6th), where the company's home office is located, and 
Chillicothe, Mo. (struck January 7th). 

THE CARPENTER 



Special Easter Feature 






IF you had been traveling 
north from Jerusalem in the 
first quarter of the Christian 
era and your cart or chariot 
had broken down after sixty 
miles or so near the village of 
Nazareth, you would have 
been directed to the shop of 
the local carpenter, Jeshua ben 
Joseph, for repairs. 

You would, perhaps, have 
found the simple shelter emp- 
ty except for the tools and 
supplies of the craftsman, but 
his mother would hurry from 
the adjoining room, offer you 
a drink of water and invite 
you to wait inside for her son 
who may have left at dawn to 
hike into the nearby wood to 
chop down a tree suitable for the rooftree of a house he 
was building. 

The wait would be pleasant and refreshing. After the 
dust and heat of the journey, the Galilean landscape 
would give an impression of luxuriance and beauty, 
especially in contrast to the harshness of Judea, from 
which you had come. The hills are round and the rich 
vegetation hides the rocks. Rainfall is heavy and the 
mood of life happy and peaceful. 



In keeping with the Eastern usage, the shop would 
have been attached to or beside the home. There would 
be an open shed in front of the shop, crowded with 
damaged carts, ploughs that needed overhauling, hewn 
logs lying on the ground, and, leaning against the low 
roof for weathering, cedar and sycamore tree trunks. 

When the carpenter appeared with the long log 
balanced on his shoulder and home-made axe in his off- 
hand, you would have been impressed by his height, at 
five feet eleven well over the average, and by the grace 
and power of his well-muscled physique. This was a man 
of strength with the easy grace of one who enjoys hard 
work and does it well. 

He would have worn a long, free-flowing garment, 
hitched up at the belt to his mid-calf to allow an easy 
stride. Bearded, his hair would have been worn shoulder- 
length in the back but cut short on the sides, and over 
one ear would have been a sliver of wood. Every trades- 
man wore such a badge of his calling (the scribe a pen, 
the tailor a needle, the weaver a bit of cloth) every day 
but the Sabbath — when such a "commercial" would have 
been forbidden. 

The village carpenter of Biblical times was a master 
builder of versatile skills. As in most rural societies, the 
Palestinian tradesmen had to know their crafts in all 
their applications. The luxury of specialization could not 
be theirs. 

This was especially true of the carpenter who was a 
man of parts, uncommonly useful and much esteemed. 




The Carpenter's adze, 
with a ku >t, 1 nude 
handle, was an carty 
Christian symbol 



As wc understand the term, there was no such word as 
carpenter in the Hebrew language — but rather the broader 
description of worker or craftsman. In Old Testament 
time this denoted a shaper and worker in wood who 
practiced at the same time the trades of joiner, cabinet- 
maker, cartwright, turner and wood sculptor. In the 
time of David and Solomon, professional carpenters were 
foreigners, and especially Phoenicians. Their trade is 
mentioned in the construction of the Temple but it was 
probably after the Exile (around 600 B.C.) that the 
Israelites adopted the trade. 




Of interest to a carpenter is this painting of the workshop of Naza- 
reth by John de Rosen. It graces St. Joseph's Library of Georgetown 
Visitation Content in Washington, D. C. 



In the New Testament, the Greek word translated as 
carpenter has a more general sense and can mean a 
house-builder or stone-mason; because of this, some 
authorities argue that this was the trade of Joseph and of 
Jesus before the beginning of his ministry. Still today, 
they point out, many stonemasons originate from Bethle- 
hem and the references Jesus makes to stone-working are 
much more numerous than his references to wood- 
working. "For which of you, wishing to build a tower, 
does not sit down first and calculate the outlays that are 
necessary, whether he has the means to complete it?" 
(Luke 14, 28) And again, "What then is this that is 
written, 'The stone which the builders rejected, has 
become the corner stone'?" (Luke 20, 17) 

We must recognize, however, that the tradition that 
sees Jesus as a carpenter, a worker in wood, developed at 



an early age and can be well supported. In the second 
century, about 160 A.D., the philosopher, St. Justin 
Martyr, wrote, "Jesus was taken to be the son of Joseph 
the carpenter, a carpenter in his own right, among men 
making carts and yokes." St. Justin was born in Samaria, 
at Neapolis, the ancient Sichcm, and was well able to 
gather information at first hand from his Galilean 
neighbors. 

St. Cyril of Jerusalem, who lived in the fourth century, 
says that he had been shown a piece of wood shaped like 
a roof gutter which was supposed to have been carved by 
Jesus or his foster father. 

Among ancient nomads there was no question of 
trades; each man made the things he needed for his own 
use — clothes, tents, tools, etc. The Palestinian peasant 
was almost independent of tradesmen and could even 
build his own house, except possibly for a little help from 
his neighbor. However, the work in metal and the making 
of waterpots required special material. It is possible that 
in Israel, as in Palestine today, blacksmiths traveled at 
times from village to village to make any 'necessary 
repairs and that potters hawked their wares. 

Trades were usually handed down from father to son, 
guilds were formed (Nehemiah 3, 8, 31) and the men of 
one craft worked in the same street or the same part of 
town as they often do today in the East. 

While the Greeks and Romans often despised all 
manual work, the Jews loved to say that a man who did 
not teach his son a trade was teaching him to be a thief. 
Notable rabbis were butchers, shoemakers, blacksmiths, 
etc., and it is well known that St. Paul took great pride 
in being a self-supporting weaver of goat-hair tent cloth. 
The Israelite reverenced his trade for its relationship to 
the Law. Before God, labor was not only a necessity; it 
called for pride, nobility and a spirit of reparation. There 
was nothing slavish or demeaning about it. On the con- 
trary it was a kind of prayer, a way of finding God, "an 
incredible honor." Only occupations that endangered 
ritual purity or morality were disliked. 

Jesus, himself, insisted on the value of work and, in 
contrast to the Greco-Roman ideal of the leisured life, 
Christianity contributed to the rehabilitation of the 
concept of the dignity of labor. 

Palestine has, no doubt, never been very rich in wood, 
but in former times it was less rare than it is today. Some 
regions possessed forests, but the country is now almost 
totally denuded of them. The Old Testament shows that 
wood was often used for making domestic or agricultural 
objects, carts and in the construction of houses (roofs, 
doors, window lattices, locks), but only great buildings, 
such as palaces, afforded the luxury of boarded floors, 




Ornamental rests supported the head of the sleeper in Biblical times. 




Color photo courtesy Camera Clix Inc. and Forests and People Magazine 
This gently-conceived diorama from Barcelona, Spain, offers an unusual scene. The Wise Men arrive to worship the Christ Child 
in the courtyard of a home in Bethlehem, while Joseph earns lodging for the Holy Family with his skills as a carpenter. 



wainscoting, colonnades of wood, or carved panels. 
(Solomon's Temple was so notable in its use of woods 
that it was referred to as the House of the Forest of 
Lebanon.) Generally speaking, stone was less precious than 
wood because it was widely available. 

While dead wood gathered carefully was used for 
cooking and heating, the ritual sacrifices required con- 
siderable quantities of wood fuel. Among the small courts 
within Herod's Temple was one called "the timber room." 
One of the thirteen collecting boxes of the Temple took 
gifts intended for the purchase of wood for the altar. 

The people of Palestine made good use of the skills of 
the woodcutter, carpenter-joiner, cabinetmaker and wood 
carver, all of which skills would have been combined in 
the jurisdiction of the Carpenter of Nazareth. His tools 
we know from texts and excavations — axes, hatchets, 
saws, scrapers, hammers, mallets, chisels, knives, squares, 
jointers, nails of wood or bronze, compass, measure, 
pencil and plumb-line. "The carpenter stretcheth out a 
line; he marketh it out with a pencil, he shapeth it with 
chisels, and he marketh it out with the divider. . . ." 
(Isaiah 44, 13) 

The adze, or ascia of the Romans, was used as a secret 
symbol, meaning the Cross, by the early Christians during 
the years of the persecutions. It was customarily carried 
in the carpenter's belt. A lump of sandstone served him 
as a plane. The saw was fashioned with flintstone teeth, 
serrated and mounted in a frame. It was pulled through 
the wood rather than pushed. Shears, files and rasps were 
unknown. The hammer was a heavy stone drilled with a 



hole to insert a handle. The drill had been introduced 
from Egypt; it was a bow-drill, turned with great 
rapidity. 

Unlike the customary depictions, the Biblical carpenter 
would not have used a work bench. He would have sat 
on the earthen floor, bracing his work between his leather 
apron and his feet and manipulating it with toes that 
became as skillful as his hands. 

The carpenter would have been a familiar sight in 




~~4i W^^ir-^—^ 



A yoke 

would have been 

handiwork of 

carpenter. 

the everyday life of Israel, as we may gather from 
Christ's words to the Pharisees, "How is it that thou 
canst see the speck of dust which is in thy brother's 
eye and are not aware of the beam that is in thy own?" 
(Matthew 7, 4; Luke 6, 42) The carrying of beams in 
those little crowded streets must have been tolerably dan- 
gerous and one of the rabbinical discussions concerns the 
case of a man bearing a beam colliding with one holding 
a pitcher. Not without irony, Christ tells the hypocrite 
that, instead of minding his neighbor's business, he would 
be better advised to watch the beam that is approaching 
and could thrust out his eye. 




A more modernistic interpretation of Joseph at work is this in 
pastel chalks by Mary Kircher, daughter of William Kircher of 
the Education Department of the AFL-CIO. Mary was 1 5 when 
she completed it. 



Carpentry work in itself in rural Galilee must have 
been of the simplest kind — nothing in comparison with 
the roofing of a steeple or the calculation of a spiral stair- 
case as our journeyman carpenters of today are required 
to do. All the roofs were flat — all that was needed was 
the laying of the beams and the covering of them with 
woven reeds. The outside staircases were straight up. But 
apart from these duties (on which the carpenter could 
scarcely have lived in a small town), he was also cabinet- 
maker, carver, wheelwright and plough and yoke maker, 
as well as wood-cutter. To him, the villagers came when 
they needed something mended, a door hung, a wall 
strengthened, a lock replaced, a chest made or a tool 
repaired. He shaped not only the thick planks needed 
for supporting the mud or clay houses, but likewise 
garden tools, cradles, biers. He made utensils for house- 
keeping, stools, milk buckets, linen presses — they had no 
use for clothes closets — and perhaps he did some fine 
cabinet work. A modest "inventory" might include 
candlesticks, kneading troughs, rakes, winnowing forks, 
a loom, grape press, plough, sledges, seats, plates, ink tray 
or cups. He could even be relied on to build a small 
fishing boat. 

In a typical day, a customer might want the stilt or 
coulter of his plough repaired; another might commission 
a pergola to be set up along the side of his house; a woman 
could come to buy a chest or possibly a bushel to measure 
her wheat; another a support for her straw pallet. (In 
the Palestinian home, mats and blankets arranged at 
ground level along the wall served as a bed by night and 
a seat by day. But among the Israelites, wealthy people 



used beds standing on legs. Jesus speaks of a lamp that 
could be placed under the bed. Often these beds were 
used to recline on at meals. Beds used for a night's rest 
might be very high and* a low stool was necessary to get 
on and off them. A bed head support, often in the shape 
of a crescent and richly carved, cradled the sleeper's 
head and was wrapped in costly coverings.) 

In those days, as always, cart wheels had hubs of iron 
which the carpenter fashioned himself, thus obliging him 
to add metal forging to his other skills. Even to our day, 
Nazareth is still noted for certain specialties — sickles, 
ploughshares, knives. 

The wooden yoke used by the Israelites hardly differed 
from the present Palestinian yoke. Formed of a transverse 
bar with long pins fixed vertically for enclosing the neck 
of the ox or mule or horse which bore it, it was also kept 
in place by thongs passed under the animal's throat. "My 
yoke is easy and my burden is light" (Matthew 11, 30) 
were the words of a skilled craftsman who took pride in 
the fact that yokes were carefully balanced to distribute 
their weight equally, were smoothly finished to prevent 
chafing. 

The chief woods used came from the cypress, oak, wild 
olive (or pine), acacia and sandalwood. The most prized 
of all was the widely-famed and aromatic cedarwood, 
which Solomon used so extensively, importing it from 
Lebanon through the merchant-princes of the day, the 
Phoenicians. 



The carpenter 

would have 
fashioned such 
chairs as this. 



But for practical applications the most esteemed wood, 
which the carpenter would tramp the woods in search of, 
was the sycamore which was proof against worms and 
which, when properly treated, was hard enough to serve 
instead of iron as a ploughshare. For ordinary use, people 
made do with olive and cypress or, for small things, old 
vine trunks. 

Yes, Jeshua ben Joseph would have been a man of 
parts, a workman who lent to his profession the dignity 
of love. He would have known it thoroughly and rev- 
erenced it — sawing logs into planks and fashioning 
furniture with joy. He would have taken pleasure in 
serving his customers . . . would have been proud without 
vanity of his skill . . . anxious that his former work had 
satisfied them, that the cart had held up, the door frame 
not warped, the bride's chest brought happiness. He 
would have understood perfectly that work done with 
love goes straight to God. 




United Brotherhood 

of Carpenters and 

foiners of America, 

AFL-CIO 




Carpenters 1 Bldg., 

101 Constitution 

Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 



Cmcdim QectttHt 



Economic Council Report Indicates 
Need For Union Apprentice Activity 



The message is getting across to 
Canadian authorities that the country 
is facing a shortage of skilled man- 
power, and that economic growth will 
be retarded if the shortage is not met. 

The first report of the Economic 
Council of Canada put it briefly, "The 
supply of highly skilled and profes- 
sional manpower will be a critical fac- 
tor in the achievement of our eco- 
nomic goals in the year ahead." 

However, realizing what is needed 
and meeting the need are two different 
things. And, unless labor unions move 
quickly to extend their apprentice train- 
ing programs so that more highly- 
skilled journeymen become available, 
the government will try to fill the gaps 
with inadequately-trained vocational 
school graduates. 

Last year the Economic Council 
made a survey in the Windsor area of 
Ontario and found that 15% of un- 
employed workers didn't seek train- 
ing because they "didn't believe such 
a course would help." In addition 
17% didn't know courses were avail- 
able. On the other hand half of those 
who took training got jobs as a direct 
result. 

A similar survey made by the On- 
tario Economic Council in the lake- 
head cities of Port Arthur and Fort 
William found that only 17% of un- 
employed had taken a trade school 
or commercial course or an approved 
apprenticeship program, and only six 
per cent had taken the Program 5 
retraining courses under the federal 
Vocational and Technical Assistance 
Act. 

The Council warned that upgrading 
of skills was essential and urged a 
broad scheme of assistance to encour- 

APRIL, 1965 



age workers to be more mobile, that 
is, to move to areas where jobs are 
available. 

In Newfoundland, a Royal Com- 
mission on Education and Youth is 
investigating the problem of technical 
education. A major problem is lack 
of technical staff in vocational schools. 

In Nova Scotia, retraining of mid- 
dle-aged workers is an important re- 
sponsibility of the Department of 
Education, while in New Brunswick, 
the government has launched an emer- 
gency training program to meet the 
expected shortage of skilled workers 
due to the boom in the forest and 
mining industries. This is reflected in 
the biggest investment boom in con- 
struction in the province's history. 

The province of Quebec has set in 
motion a study of the apprenticeship 
training system. Fields getting parti- 
cular attention are metal working and 
automative industries. The huge Gen- 
eral Motors plant being built at Ste. 
Therese is sparking a boom in sub- 
sidiary plants. 

Technological institutes are being 
increased in Ontario. Like most other 
provinces, the training programs are 
being geared to federal standards in 
order to qualify for federal grants. 
Pilot projects of "training-in-industry" 
are already underway with 75% as- 
sistance from Ottawa. 

In Manitoba, plans are just getting 
underway to take more advantage 
of the federal government's cost-shar- 
ing program of in-plant training. So 
far only the garment industry has 
benefitted. The Manitoba Institute of 
Technology is now in its second year 
of operation with a full enrollment. 

Two technical institutes in Saskatch- 



ewan are training workers in the con- 
struction field while Alberta is now 
working on an in-plant training pro- 
gram in co-operation with Ottawa. 

The west coast province of British 
Columbia is working out apprentice- 
ship training programs to assist the 
pulp and paper industry. The terrific 
expansion in this industry will add 
about 4,000 skilled workers to the 
labor force by 1970 in this field alone. 

Looking at the situation from coast 
to coast, it is evident that action is 
being taken in worker-training. It pre- 
sents a challenge to unions to broaden 
and increase their apprenticeship pro- 
grams. 

Trend to Apartments 
And Row Housing 

The housing industry had a record 
year in 1964 and celebrated the oc- 
casion at a conference of the National 
House Builders Association in Calgary. 
Of 165,658 dwellings started, 150,963 
were completed. 

The Association was advised by the 
president of the federal Central Mort- 
gage and Housing Corporation H. W. 
Hignett to take note of population 
trends which indicate the need for 
rental accommodation rather than 
homes for sale. This means apart- 
ments rather than single-family dwell- 
ings. 

The trend to apartments and row 
housing is already in evidence. In 
1961 only about 30 per cent of dwell- 
ing units were apartments and row 
houses. In 1964 the proportion was 
48 per cent. 

The CMHC president said that 
apartment builders were paying more 
attention to design and amenities than 
homebuilders and for this reason also 
were getting a bigger share of the 
market. 



21 



^~ Big annual labor-management exhi- 
bition of union skills and services , , . 




THE 1965 AFL-CIO 

UNION INDUSTRIES 
* SHOW 



CIVIC ARENA 
PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 

MAY 21-26 



*5> 



•£ More than 350 action-packed dis- 
plays 

^ Music and entertainment 

"^ Watch union craftsmen at work 

^ Thousands of dollars worth of free 

gifts and souvenirs 
^Af Hundreds of valuable prizes 



OPEN TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC 

ADMISSION FREE 

Mark it down on your calendar now! 



Brotherhood to Be 1965 Ul Show Exhibitor 



Add the talents and skills of union 
craftsmen to the managerial know-how 
of some of the nation's leading cor- 
porations. Take one of the nation's 
finest auditoriums, located in a major 



city with an enthusiastic union popula- 
tion. The result is the highly-success- 
ful AFL-CIO Union Industries Show. 
It has been presented each year for 
more than two decades in some major 




city of the United States, and now it 
comes to the Golden Triangle of Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. 

Once again the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America 
will be a major exhibitor at the show. 
Samples of outstanding craft work 
from union-contract shops in the Pitis- 
burgh area will be displayed. Person- 
nel from the International Union and 
from the District Council will be on 
hand to talk to visitors. 

Hundreds of colorful exhibits are 
displayed. In several instances, the 
actual processes of manufacturing arc 
displayed. Glass bottle blowers, bar- 
bers, cake decorators, bricklayers, and 
other skilled workers perform their 
work-day tasks before wide-eyed au- 
diences. The real story of labor- 
management achievement is told in 
this six-day extravaganza. 

The average audience for the big 
annual exhibition is 400,000 visitors. 
It's a record that few shows can match. 

This annual "open house," as the 
show is often called, is an ideal contact 
between the trade union movement 
and the general public. It extends the 
nationwide educational goals of the 
trade union movement and promotes 
the general welfare of all. 



Center, above: The Pittsburgh Civic Arena, Site of the 1965 Union Industries Show. 



Books That Will Help You 

CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION. Reprinted— has 
163 p., 463 11., covering concrete work, form build- 
ing, screeds, reinforcing, scaffolding and other 
temporary construction. No other book like it on 
the market. $3.50. 

CARPENTRY.— Has 307 p. 767 11., covering 
general house earpentry, estimating, making win- 
dow and door frames, heavy timber framing, 
trusses, and other important building subjects. $3.50. 

CARPENTER'S TOOLS.— Covers sharpening and 
using tools. An important craft problem for each 
tool explained. One of the top-best of my books 
—you should have it. Has 156 p. and 394 11. 
$3.50. 

BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— Has 380 
p. 670 11., and about 7,000 building trades terms 
and expressions. Defines terms and gives many 
practical building suggestions. Tou need this 
book. $4.00. (Out of stock.) 

THE STEEL SQUARE.— Has 192 p., 498 11., 
covering all important steel-square problems in- 
cluding stairbuilding and roof framing. The most 
practical book on the square sold today. Price 
$3.50. 

CABINETS AND BU I LT- 1 NS.— This new book 
has 102 pages, 193 illustrations, covering kitchen 
cabinets, built-ins. bathroom cabinets, closets, 
Lazy Susan features. Paperback $1.50. 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of 
practical building problems — many of them worth 
the price of the book. Has 256 p. and 686 11. 
$3.50. 

NOTICE.— Tou can't go wrong if you buy this 
whole set. 

THE FIRST LEAVES.— Poetry. Only $1.50. 
SPECIAL. — Closing out second edition. TWIGS 
OF THOl'GHT, 50c. 

THE WAILING PLACE.— This book Is made up 
of controversial prose and the fable PUSHING 
BUTTONS. Spiced with sarcasm and dry humor. 
$2.00. 

FREE.— With 8 books, THE WAILING PLACE 
and 2 poetry books free; with 5 books, 2 poetry 
books free, and with 3 books, 1 poetry book free. 

With 2 books, THE WAILING PLACE for $1.00, 
and with 1 book, a poetry book for half price. 

NOTICE. — Postage paid only when full remittance 
comes with order. No C.O.D. to Canada. 

Order u u ...... - 222 So. Const. St. 

Today. ■■• »!• OltwtLt Emporia, Kansas 

BOOKS BOOKS 

— For Birthday gifts, etc. — 



22 



THE CARPENTER 





Idffi 



GsBnfef? 



7000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "'stood 
out from the crowd.*" This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 




KURT DUBBERKE of Local 620 in Madison, New Jersey, is an active leader in the Boy 
Scout movement. He is the advisor of the Explorer Post 159, Gillette, New Jersey. 

Brigadier General Donald Straight of McGuire Air Force Base recently presented 
the Eagle award to five of Kurt's Scouts. 

Kurt is shown here with his five Eagle Scouts. They are, from the left: David 
Finn, Armin Dubberke, Advisor Dubberke, Richard Finn, Richard Ledder and Mario 
Dubberke. 




THE FLORIDA STATE COUNCIL of Carpenters recently held its fifth annual apprentice- 
ship contest at Miami. The finalists from the left, included: Frank C. Hardes, Local 
1685, Melbourne; Werner L. Bachman (2nd place winner). Local 696, Tampa; Roger 
Ashburn (1st place winner), Local 1509, Miami; Donald Torres (3rd place winner), 
Local 1394, Fort Lauderdale; and Charles E. Garrison, Local 819, West Palm Beach. 
Plaques and cups were presented the winners. 



Big Profits in 

UPHOLSTERY 

Get Your Share.. .FAST! 



NEW 
EASY IS 

1 WAYS f"<rl 



EARN 

BIG 

MONEY 1 



1. Be your own boss, make up to 
85% profit on every job. 

2. Start earning right away while 
learning at home in sparetime — 
keep furniture you build, or sell 
for hundreds of dollars. 

3. Today's home and office uphol- 
stery, reupholstery, slipcover 
boom make it easy to say "good- 
bye" to layoffs and take your 
pick of steady big-pay jobs. 

LEARNING EASY AS A B C 

Your own two hands are all you 
need. UTS experts and simple in- 
structions do the rest. You get 
all tools, new wooden frames, 
materials, fabrics, business tips, 
wholesale privileges, decorating 
magic at no extra charge. You 
LEARN FAST, EARN FAST. Up- 
holstery Trades School Dept. 518-045 
Little Falls, N. J. Accredited Mem- 
ber Nat'l Home Study Council, N. J. 
State Approved, Vet. Approved. Mail 
coupon ioday! 




FREE 1 

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Pages Give Proof 
— Show How 




iifobliihed 

193 9 I 



UPHOLSTERY TRADES SCHOOL 
Dept. 518-045 
(Division of Technical Home Study Schools) 
Little Falls, New Jersey 

Please send me FREE book, "Your New Way to a Suc- 
cessful Career" and FREE sample lesson sheets. No 
obligation — no salesman will call. 

Name __ 

Address 

City, State _ _ zip" 



You Can Develop A Profitable 
Business on A Shoestring 

Make $5.00 an Hour in 
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t wish there was space here to print the 
hundreds of letters received from men I've 
put in business with the Be/saw Sharp-All, 
With this precision machine you can sharpen 
all popular household, garden and shop 
tools easily and quickly. You need no pre- 
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I have been helping men get Into this pro- 
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I Name ■ 



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_2ip_ 




APRIL 



1 965 



23 




HANDY POWER SAW GUIDE 




. . . Handles Angle Cuts Quickly 

A new precision saw guide for circular 
as well as sabre and hand saws has been 
developed by Glen Ridge Tools. Park 
Ridge, Illinois. This new guide now 
makes it possible to make any cross or 
angle cut easily, quickly and accurately. 

It adjusts and locks to any angle with 
a flick of the wrist. Made of chrome- 
plated, heavy gauge steel, it provides a 
strong and accurate guide edge for all 
saws and also serves as a protractor for 
laying out work. It folds flat for easy 
storage and even has a hole provided for 
quick hang-up. It sells direct from the 
manufacturer for $4.95 postpaid. Glen 
Ridge Tools. 112 S. Clifton Avenue. 
Park Ridge, 111. 

CEDAR NAIL BROCHURE 

"Nails and Nailing" is the title of a 
new brochure produced by Western Red 
Cedar Lumber Association. 

This four-page pamphlet is the result 
of seven years of research by the Asso- 
ciation. The research included testing 
of various nails in actual use plus labora- 
tory tests under simulated conditions. 
The Association also utilzed specialized 
studies conducted by nail manufacturers. 

Various types of nails suitable for 
cedar installation are outlined in the 
brochure, which also points out the vari- 
ous requirements that are necessary for 
best results. The pamphlet also lists 
types recommended and describes the ad- 
vantages of various nail heads. 

In conclusion, the brochure describes 
proper application of Western Red 



Cedar bevel siding, tongue and groove, 
board and batten and channel patterns. 
For a copy of "Nails and Nailing", 
write io Western Red Cedar Lumber 
Association, 4403 White-Henry-Stuart 
Bldg., Seattle. Washington 98101. 

ELECTRIC-DRILL ROUTER 

Now the electric drill, already used for 
multiple jobs, can he even more useful. 
Comp-Tool, Inc., Ashtabula, Ohio, has 
designed the "Routermatic," a tool that 
in. ikes any electric drill a power pack for 
a variety of routing operations. With it, 
many jobs can he accomplished at the 
site which ordinarily might require refer- 
ral to a woodworking shop. 

An airplane type-clamp securely holds 
any drill with a motor stator frame 
ranging between 3'i to 11 inches in cir- 
cumference in position. The Routermatic 
permits adjustment to depth of cut and 
angle of cut, having adjustment screws 
for micromatic centering. An open, hand 
plane type base is equipped with an ad- 
justable right angle edge guide. 

The Routermatic permits an electric 
drill to be used as the power source for 
making inside or outside mortises, dado- 
ing or routing, tenoning, rabbeting or 
even making inlay slots or filigree de- 
signs. Since many of these wood-remov- 
ing operations are generally performed 
with a wood chisel, this tool attached to 
an electric drill in effect becomes an elec- 
tric chisel. Acquired skill in handling it 



available from Permalite Plastics Corp- 
oration, 608 Terminal Way, Costa Mesa, 
California. .V i ounce "Meter Tube," 
postpaid in U.S.A., $2. 

NEW SAFETY HAT 




. . . Adapts to Many Jobs 

makes it even more useful. The Router- 
matic is sold directly by the manufac- 
turer, including a four-fluted router bit, 
for $6.95. 

NEW EPOXY ADHESIVE 

"Poxy Putty" is a new epoxy resin 
adhesive for general use in construction. 
It can fill holes and replace nails, screws 
and other fastenings. It is said the ma- 
terial will break before the bond. "Poxy 
Putty" will bond together similar or dis- 
similar materials of every conceivable 
type. It is also used to fill cracks and 
holes in any type of material. Available 
in a new 3% ounce "Meter Tube," which 
automatically dispenses equal parts of 
the putty and energizer, or in kits from 
1/2 pint to 5 gallons. Free brochure is 




. . . With Four-Point Suspension 

Rigid, high-density polyethylene safety 
caps and hats, described as the "best head- 
wear buy available in the low price 
bracket," were highlighted by Mine Safety 
Appliances Company, Pittsburgh, at the 
annual exhibit of The Associated Gen- 
eral Contractors of America at the San 
Francisco Hilton last month. 

The V-Gard head protection has un- 
usual resistance to impact and penetra- 
tion, and features a four-point, fixed- 
crown suspension that fixes a tamperproof 
safety clearance between the wearer's 
head and the hat shell. 

WOOD-FINISH BOOKLET 

"How to Finish Beautiful Wood" — in 
just four basic steps — is described for the 
home craftsman in a new illustrated book- 
let by the Watco-Dennis Corporation of 
(1756 22nd Street) Santa Monica, Calif. 

The easy-reference, pocket-size booklet 
was prepared to help the home crafts- 
man "do professional finishing quickly, 
easily and economically — on all the va- 
rieties of wood available today." Text 
and unusual drawings show how this is 
done with Watco Danish Oil Finish, the 
same uniquely formulated oil used by 
professionals throughout the world. ' 

Designed for convenient use at any 
home workbench, the booklet includes 
special tips on working with wood, and 
briefly explains the 5-in-l Watco process 
that preserves, hardens, seals, primes and 
beautifies any domestic or exotic wood. 

To obtain a copy of the booklet, write 
directly to the Watco-Dennis Corporation, 
1756 22nd Street, Santa Monica, Calif., 
enclosing a 5-cent stamp to cover the 
cost of postage. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



POLYETHYLENE FILMS 

Distribution of Union Carbide's Zendel 
blown polyethylene films for the build- 
ing industry, initially limited to 13 
Southern states, has been expanded to 
national coverage. Lumber yards and 
building supply houses form a key seg- 
ment of the numerous outlets now dis- 
tributing the film. 

Zendel polyethylene film provides an 
effective moisture vapor barrier for gen- 
eral construction uses. It minimizes 
moisture damage as a crawl space cover. 
as a concrete slab cover during curing, 
and as a sand or gravel base overlay 
in "slab-on-grade" construction. 

Zendel film has also proved effective 
as a subflooring cover: as protection for 
exterior walls and ceilings: as concealed 
flashing on window sills: or as a trap cov- 
er on lumber, steel, bricks, cement, wall- 
board, or machinery. 

Zendel black pigmented film is spe- 
cially formulated to be highly weather- 
resistant as well as to withstand exposure 
to extended periods of sunlight. A spe- 
cial white formulation is available for 
applications requiring maximum reflec- 
tivity such as concrete curing blankets. 

Notably economical, these construc- 
tion films are tough, lightweight, water- 
proof, flexible at low temperatures (minus 
70 degrees), puncture and tear resistant, 
unaffected by most acids and alkalies, 
easy to handle, and crack and mildew 
resistant. 

Zendel construction films are marketed 
by the Plastics Division's Films Depart- 
ment. 




EFFECTIVE ENCLOSURE for build- 
ing industry use is provided by Zendel 
polyethylene film. Tough, economical, 
waterproof and flexible even at low tem- 
peratures, film is distributed through 
building material supply houses. 




POLYETHELENE FILM minimizes 
moisture damage when incorporated into 
structure and when used as a tarp on 
building materials or equipment. 




IllMf 




HOLD IT 



That's exactly what Sheffield Scotch Nails do better than round 
nails. Tests conducted 30 days after driving showed that square 
Scotch Nails have 100% greater withdrawal resistance than reg- 
ular round nails. The reason is the angled serrations on all four 
sides of the Scotch Nail. These serrations grip the wood fibres, 
anchor the nail. The more the wood dries and contracts, the 
tighter the nail grips. 

Increased holding power is just one of the unique advantages 
offered by Sheffield Scotch Nails. Because of the square design, 
Scotch Nails tend to reduce wood-splitting. They cut their way 
into the wood, causing less expansion of grain. You can expect 
less wasted wood, and a finished job you can be proud of. 

Scotch Nails are available in all popular sizes and types— com- 
mon, finishing, truss, box, roofing and gutter spikes, to mention 
a few. Try them, and benefit from the unique square design. For 
samples of Sheffield Scotch Nails, fill in and mail the coupon to 
Armco Steel Corporation, Steel Division, Department W-805, 7000 
Roberts Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64125. 



Armco Steel Corporation, Steel Division 

Department W-805, 7000 Roberts Street 
Kansas City, Missouri 64125 

□ Please send me samples of Sheffield Scotch Nails 



dealer's name 



dealer's address 



M 



ARMCO 



APRIL, 1965 



25 



IN MEMOR1AM 



I .1 . NO. 10, 

CHICAGO, UL. 

Albert, Steve 

Urn. Christ 
Backstrom, Axel 
Brady, William C. 
Getchas, Anton 
I [arris, Edward C. 
Jackson. Marion, R. 
Long. Allen 
Nelson. Peter 
Nuehring, Emil C. 
Perkins. William H. 
Tcllefsen. Bernard 

L.U. NO. 12, 
SYRACUSE. N. Y. 

Clancy, Lawrence 
Davitt. Thomas 
Frass. William O. 
Horstig. William 
Lamontagne, Gus 
Potter. Allen O. 
Rupracht, William B. 

L.U. NO. 15, 
HACKENSACK, N. 3. 

Demarest. 
Thomas Baldwin 

L.U. NO. 34, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

CALIF. 

Baker, Andy 
Billeter. George 
Black. Carl 
Cramlett. William 
Edner. H. R. 
Freeman, Alex 
GifFord. H. S. 
Gracia, Lawrence 
Hale, S. E. 
Jones. George 
Keller. Dan 
Kemp. George 
Kilkelly. Edward 
Legg, Frank 
Lowe, Robert 
Lusk, C. E. 
Moore. James C. 
Peterson, Clarence 
Prose. Lee 
Sneed. Herbert 
Watson. Alvin 

L.U. NO. 35, 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Hood. Don 

L.U. NO. 36, 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Jackson, William O. 
Smith, James R. 

L.U. NO. 54, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Dolinski. Thomas 
Mizaur, George 
Prerost, Andrew 
Silhan, Robert 
Sliwa, Anton 



L.U. NO. 55, 
DENVER, COLO. 

Madsen, Ejner 
Miller. Herman A. 
Surprenant. Hilaire 

L.U. NO. 60, 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Comer. Charles 
Garner. John 
Hawkins, Harry J. 
Johnson. P. A. 
Preston. James W. 
Riehman. Jacob 
Robb, Omer 
Schwartz. Louis 

L.U. NO. 62, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Danielson, Carl 
Juravich. Frank 
Reigel. Fred 
Swanson. Carl J. 

L.U. NO. 74, 
CHATTANOOGA, 

TENN. 
Brewer. R. S. 
Crowe, Albert A. 
Price. Joseph J. 
West. George L. 
White. Dallas L. 

L.U. NO. 88, 
ANACONDA, MONT. 

Dumonthier, William 

L.U. NO. 90, 
EVANSVILLE, IND. 

Elam, John A. 
Ottman, Henry 
Reherman, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Beck, Alfred E. 
Buxbaum. Joseph D. 
Greiner, Rudolph 

L.U. NO. 131, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Arnold, B. C. 
Bennett. Andrew S. 
Bond. Leonard W. 
Hall, Lawrence C. 
Hanson, Theodore 
Kopsala, Pete 
Lundquist. John S. 
Maki, Otto 
Roberg, Frank T. 
Simms, James W. 
Wojtanowicz, Stanley 

L.U. NO. 132, 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Wiles, Oren R. 

L.U. NO. 135, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Rubin, Isidor 
Rubinsky, Isidore 
Sinicandro, Sergio 



L.U. NO. 141. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Benson. Sandner 
Haual, Robert 
Hedquist, Iver 
Jacobson, J. W. 
Syverson. Fredrick 

L.U. NO. 153, 
HELENA, MONT. 

Bcrgum. Adolph 
Chriski, Walter 
Grant. Ronald 

L.U. NO. 161, 
KENOSHA, WIS. 

Birchard, Leland 
Fechner, Ernst 
Radkc, Albert 

L.U. NO. 169, 

EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL 

Bell, Harry 
Finley, James 
Hackman, Frank 
Jerome, Albert 
Larcom. Robert 
Meddows, Leavern 
Pinkley, A. R. 
Volkman, Carl 
Vondracek, Frank 

L.U. NO. 180, 
VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Ellis, P. O. 
Hood. Clifford 
Kingston, George L. 

L.U. NO. 184, 
SALT LAKE, CITY, 
UTAH 

Durtschi, Hy 
Egli, Joseph 
Johnson, Albert L. 

L.U. NO. 186, 
STEUBENVILLE, OHIO 

Shafer, Hiram 
Smith, Ora C. 

L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEXAS 

Ayala, Richard 
Christensen, Jake 
Henry. Vernon Max 

L.U. NO. 213, 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Brock, A. W. 
Eakins, L. O. 
Herndon, Turner H. 
Hughes, T. C. 
Jacobson, R. L. 
Johnson, Huey R. 
Knauf, William H. 
Planch, J. A. 
Varnell, Joseph 
Wages, Dick 

L.U. NO. 225, 
ATLANTA, GA. 

Collins, Frank 



Clonic. L. H. 
Henry. H. A. 
Johnson, Ralph 
Lee, J. W. 
Sandlin, Boyd 
Thomas. W. B. 

L.LI. NO. 246. 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Anderson. Herman 
Mierzwa, Raymond 

L.U. NO. 257, 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Dane. Arthur 
McDermott. Frank 
Olsen, Ola 
Olson. Albin 

L.U. NO. 281, 
BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 

Novak, George 

L.U. NO. 284, 
JAMAICA, N. Y. 

Calicchio, Thomas 
Larson, Gothard 
Rudiger, Charles 
Waters, Morris 

L.U. NO. 289, 
LOCKPORT, N. Y. 

Capen, Albert 

L.U. NO. 298, 

LONG ISLAND CITY, 

N. Y. 

Cullen, James E. 
Ilchert, John D. 
Kisely, Paul 

L.U. NO. 308, 
CEDAR RAPIDS, 
IOWA 

Bleedner, Charles 
Bleedner, Roy 
Bowker, George 
Helm, Russell 

L.U. NO. 314, 
MADISON, WIS. 

Eller, Ronald W. 
Lundquist, Walter W. 

L.U. NO. 345, 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 
Brashier, E. N. 
Corder. Robert 
Dycus, R. M. 
Hendrix, J. W. 
Martin, A. D. 
Morgan, John D. 
Salter, B. F. 
Siberts, L. A. 

L.U. NO. 359, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Breckner. Albert 

Der Varta Nian, Hagop 

L.U. NO. 366, 
BRONX, N. Y. 

Sinclair, Herbert C. 



L.U. NO. 440, 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 

Berns, John C. 
Dressier, Frank 
Hanson. Charles 
Mezey. Paul 
Sandberg, Nil 

L.U. NO. 450, 
OGDEN, UTAH 

Reed, Artie V. 

L.U. NO. 469, 
CHEYENNE, WYO. 

Simmons, Andrew 

L.U. NO. 470, 
TACOMA, WASH. 

Brown. Arthur H. 
Kenyon, Lloyd 
Kieszling. George 
Lewis, L. L. 
McAllister, Joseph 
Nichols, Gilbert 
Pointer, Morris 
Siler, George 
Stauffacher, Mike 
Strom. Sam 
Wilson. Adolph 

L.U. 494, 
WINDSOR, ONT. 

Trinacty, Bartholemew 

L.U. NO. 512, 

ANN ARBOR, MICH. 

Kapp, George 

L.U. NO. 534, 
BURLINGTON, IOWA 

Anderson, David Gordon 

L.U. NO. 570, 

ST. JOHNS, NFLD. 

Strickland, William T. 
Whiffen, Samuel 

L.U. NO. 584, 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Piton, Yves A. 

L.U. NO. 586, 

SACRAMENTO, 

CALIF. 

Aasletten, Carl O. 
Anderson, Bengt A. 
Cameron, Dan 
Cannon, A. F. 
Clary, James J. 
Fisher, Jack F. 
Geddis, Roy W. 
Hartwig, Edwin T. 
Hein, Daniel 
Hiestand, Charles H. 
Highfill, C. W., Sr. 
Leedy, Wayne 
Lovelace, A. L. 
McMahon, James E. 
Main, Julian K. 
Moody, William T. 
Nauman, Hurchel S. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



Oppen. Walter F. 
Peterson. Bernie E. 
Powers, M. E. 
Rieger. Jacob 
Rodness. Woodrow 
Rohrer. J. J. 
Schmidt, Albert J. 
Scollard. Charles 
Wolfe. John C. 
Wonser. Walter W. 
Woodson. W. W. 

L.U. NO. 627, 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Amerson, W. E. 
Kirkland. A. B. 
Moody. James T. 
O'Neal, Walter 
Skinner. Burton 
Whitten, Dan 

L.U. NO. 639, 
AKRON, OHIO 

Christensen, C. R. 
Davis. George 
Sliger, R. E. 
Spitzer, Louis 

L.U. NO. 696, 
TAMPA, FLA. 

Adams, Elmo 
Brown, Herbert 
Dolcater. C. F. 
Goodrum. C. T. 
Hitson. George M. 
Mitchell, J. L. 
Russell, H. L. 
Soderlund. A. W. 

L.U. NO. 711, 
MT. CARMEL, PA. 

Pounder. Louis F. 
Radzai. Anthony J. 
Weikle, Ralph 

L.U. NO. 756, 
BELLINGHAM, WASH. 

LaVeille, Peter 

L.U. NO. 764, 
SHREVEPORT, LA. 

Nield, C. M. 

L.U. NO. 787, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Jamisko, J. 

L.U. NO. 808, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Greco, Paul 
Jokela, Einar 
Montovano, Oreste 
Vincenzi, William 
Zito, Joseph 



L.U. NO. 848, 

SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 

Bachand. Leo 

L.U. NO. 878, 
BEVERLY, MASS. 

Berry, Guy 
Leek. Donald 

L.U. NO. 950, 
LYNBROOK, N. Y. 

Fernandez. Paul L. 

L.U. NO. 982, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Baron, John 
Neish. John 
Ollis, James 

L.U. NO. 993, 
MIAMI, FLA. 

Brunner, Peter 
Hayman, J. C. 
Hiscox, Raymond M. 
McCrory, S. M. 
Rozensky. Anthony 
Witt. Gustin E. 

L.U. NO. 1089, 
PHOENIX, ARIZ. 

Curry, John A. 

L.U. NO. 1187, 
GRAND ISLAND, 
NEBR. 

Seier, Rudolph 

L.U. NO. 1207, 
CHARLESTON, W. VA. 

Amorese, Frank 
Breedlove. Hugh L. 
Corbin. Ersel Warren 
Foster, William 
Jennings. Conrad 

L.U. NO. 1209, 
NEWARK, N. J. 

Scott, William 

L.U. NO. 1235, 
MODESTO, CALIF. 

Stiles, Cyrk Allen 
Woodworth.. Pierce W. 

L.U. NO. 1353, 
SANTA FE, N. M. 

Terrell. George R. 

L.U. NO. 1367, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Barczewski, Raymond 
Carlson, Sven 
Johnson, Ernest C. 



L.U. NO. 1394, 

FORT LAUDERDALE, 

FLA. 

Hoffman, Valentine 
Osborne, Charles J. 

L.U. NO. 1437 
COMPTON, CALIF. 

Kaylor, John R. 

L.U. NO. 1456, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Akerblom, Tycko 
Boling, Oskar 
Fiiedel, Michael 
Gustavson, Fred 
Jensen, Robert 
Mulhern, Thomas 
Nielsen, John 
Person, Frits 
Petersen, Arnt 
Rowley, Edward 
Swanson, Fritz 
Thompson, Christ 
Timberg. Sigurd 

L.U. NO. 1471, 
JACKSON, MISS. 

Boyd. F. J. 
Boyd, Daniel J. 
Crapps, John H. 
Garrett, C. E. 
Poole, W. A. 
Shedd, J. M. 
Skinner, R. E. 
Williams, R. E. 

L.U. NO. 1497, 
EAST LOS ANGELES, 
CALIF. 

Henricks, L. E. 
Nellis, Norman G. 
Paulsen, William F. 
Wilson, Joseph G. 

L.U. NO. 1507, 

EL MONTE, CALIF. 

Grabman, Alfred C. 
Smith, Fred J. 
White, Jess E. 
Wuensch. Fritz 

L.U. NO. 1518, 
GULFPORT, MISS. 

Mays, H. L. 
Ploue, John J., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 1531, 
ROCKLAND, MISS. 

Perry, Mantis W. 



L.U. NO. 1587, L.U. NO. 1822, 

HUTCHINSON, KANS. FORT WORTH, TEXAS 

Gibbs, Forrest Griffin, Arthur F. 

Parrish, Walter Keith Parker, James R. 



L.U. NO. 1613, 
NEWARK, N. J. 

Petillo, Michael 
Scarpitta, William 

L.U. NO. 1615, 
GRAND RAPIDS, 
MICH. 

Hansen, Carl C. 

L.U. NO. 1629, 
ASHTABULA, OHIO 

Safcik, Frank 

L.U. NO. 1644, 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
Anderson, Carl A. 
Anderson, Carl M. 
Grimm, Edward 
Hallich, Robert O. 
Kane, Russell 
Moe, William J. 
Norby, Paul F. 
Rindahl, Olaf 
Smegal, John F. 
Swanson, Frank M. 

L.U. NO. 1650, 
LEXINGTON, KY. 

Freeman, Elmer Lee 
Lawson, Jack E. 
Price, J. Lewis 

L.U. NO. 1654, 
MIDLAND, MICH. 

Awrey, Herbert 

L.U. NO. 1665, 
ALEXANDRIA, VA. 

Shelton, Hoyt 

L.U. NO. 1707, 
LONGVIEW, WASH. 

Bryant, Dale E. 
Oyen. Louis A. 

L.U. NO. 1730, 
ESTES PARK, COLO. 

King, Euel L. 

L.U. NO. 1815, 

SANTA ANA, CALIF. 
Boatwright, H. O. 
Gibson, Irvin 
Ireland, J. R. 
McGee. James I. 
Poland, James C. 
Winters, Walter H. 



L.U. NO. 1913, 
VAN NUYS, CALIF. 
Botsford, Harry A. 
Gibbs, Fred H. 
Vasey, William A. 

L.U. NO. 2020, 

SAN DIEGO, CALIF. 

Provenghi. Arturo 

L.U. NO. 2073, 
MILWAUKEE, WISC. 

Grudzielanek, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 2094, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Jordan, Charles 
Kawoles, Joseph 
O'Connell, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 2117, 
FLUSHING, N. Y. 

Story, Ernest 

L.U. NO. 2133, 
ALBANY, ORE. 

Stitch, Oscar 

L.U. NO. 2163, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Caldwell, James 
Connelly, James 
Crawford, Denis 
McPheat, James 

L.U. NO. 2203, 
ANAHEIM, CALIF. 

Davis, Robert Lee 
Fryer, Robert, Sr. 
Huisinga, Gephart 

L.U. NO. 2288, 
LOS ANGELES, 
CALIF. 

Bourkard, A. J. 
Lewis. Harry 
Pernod, Charles 

L.U. NO. 2435, 
INGLEWOOD, CALIF. 

Howell. Rolland E. 
Marasse, Alfred W. 
Rhodes, Clifton 

L.U. NO. 2527, 
VICTORIA, B. C. 

Dewar, James 

L.U. NO. 2811, 
SALISBURY, MD. 

Bell, Paul E. 



APRIL, MONTH TO FIGHT CANCER— George Meany, President of the American Federation of Labor 
and Congress of Industrial Organizations, has called upon all members of the labor federation to join the American 
Cancer Society Crusade in April. 

Mr. Meany said, in a letter to General Garrison H. Davidson, Chairman of the Society's 1965 Crusade, that 
labor is encouraged by the fact that increasing research efforts are bringing "growing hope of success in the Fight 
against cancer." 

The President of the AFL-CIO urged union members "to give generous support to the Society's program of 
Research, Education and Service." 



APRIL, I 965 



27 




(0)1 




He'll Learn 

A young draftee was startled out 
of a sound sleep by his platoon ser- 
geant his first night in the army. 

"Hey, you!" bellowed the sergeant, 
"It's 4:30!" 

"Four-thirty?" mumbled the rookie. 
"Man, you'd better get to bed. We 
got a big day tomorrow." 



Dead Letter? 




Message on the outside of a parcel 
post package of fish: "If not delivered 
in five days . . . NEVER MIND!" 



/() V Ml 



Taking Their Turns 

Mother: "And what happened 
after Jimmy hit you the first time?" 

Tommy: "He hit me a third time." 

Mother: "You mean he hit you a 
second time, don't you?" 

Tommy: "No ... I hit him the sec- 
ond time." 
— Eugene Pennell, Carmanville, Nfld. 



Cross-Cut or R.I.P. 

A Magician contacted his agent, 
telling him; "I have perfected the 
trick 'sawing a woman in half . . . 
get me bookings!" The agent replied, 
"Sawing a woman in half is old saw. 
. . It has been done before!" "But,'' 
butted the magician, "I do it length- 
wise!" 

—Mel W. Berle, Bakersfield, Calif. 



Mr. Pert Sez: 

Only a very -small man will hide 
behind a woman's skirts. Nowadays 
he's gotta be a real midget. 

Punny Geography 

"Is she HUNGARY?" Jim asked 
Bill. "I dunno," replied Bill, "ALAS- 
KA." When he did, she said: "Yes, 
SIAM." 

"All right, I BOLIVIA and I'm 
GHANA FIJI," Bill promised. "Well, 
don't RUSSIA self," cautioned Jim. 
"But what if she WALES?" asked 
Bill. "Then give her a CANADA 
CHILE," Jim suggested. 

"No," she said, "IDAHO lot rather 
have some TURKEY." So she had 
some without any GREECE and when 
the waiter brought the CZECH Jim 
said: "Look to see if EGYPT you. I'm 
afraid IOWA big bill and I CONGO 
for cheating!" 

So the waiter tossed them out, 
yelling: "You go URUGUAY and I'll 
go mine ... I have SPOKANE! 
— Janie Grech, 
Madison, Ohio 

ALWAYS BOOST YOUR UNION 

It Figures! 

The professor was trying to explain 
the concept of measuring the circum- 
ference of an object. "If I go all the 
way around a figure, what will I get?" 
he asked. 

A girl in the back answered: 
"Slapped!" 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■a 

This Month's Limerick 

A Turk by the name of Haroun 
Ate whisky by means of a spoon. 
To one who asked why 
He made this reply: 
"To drink is forbidden, you loon!" 

— Mrs. Jonn Bolchunos, 
Advada, Colo. 



Different Matter! 

The drunk was indignant on being 
arrested. He staggered up to the 
desk sergeant, pounded on the desk 
and shouted: "What I wanna know is 
why I'm arrested?" 

The sergeant replied: "You were 
brought in for drinking." 

"Well, thass different — thass fine. 
Le'sh get started!" 



Mother Goose Revisited 




Remember the story about The 
Cow That Jumped Over The Moon? 
Now we know ... it was because of 
a milkmaid with cold hands! 




BE VI 



BUY LABEL 



Tell Me Mower! 

Joan — A job well done never has 
to be done again. 

Jasper — Oh, yeah? What about 
mowing the lawn? 



28 



THE CARPENTER 




/ 

/ 



LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Ohio Valley District Council Celebrates 
75th Anniversary in Recent Ceremonies 



district 



CINCINNATI, O.— In the April, 1889, 
issue of The Carpenter, the official jour- 
nal of the organization, attention was 
called to the fact that a Carpenters' Dis- 
trict Council had just been formed in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, by Local 2 and 209. 
From April. 1889, until 1915, this Dis- 
trict Council was known as the "Car- 
penters' District Council of Hamilton 
County, Ohio." In 1915, the name was 
changed to the "Carpenters' District 
Council of Hamilton County, Ohio; Ken- 
ton and Campbell Counties, Kentucky" 
and in 1938, the name was changed to 
the present name, "The Ohio Valley Car- 
penters' District Council." 

The seventy-fifth anniversary of this 
District Council was recently celebrated 
by the members, officers, guests and their 
wives. About 1,000 persons participated 
in a commemorative program and ob- 
served the occasion with a grand banquet 
and dance held at the Hotel Sheraton- 
Gibson in Cincinnati. 

The District has grown from several 
hundred craftsmen to a membership of 
3,500, many of whom have contributed 
much to the success of both the local and 



Membership Pins 
Given By Local 125 




UTICA, N.Y.— A 50-year pin was 
presented to Henry Wagner, left of Local 
125, Utica, by Earl T. Blancher, past 
president of Local 125. Local President 
George Weber (center) looks on. 

Nine members of Local 125 received 
25-year pins, they were: Samuel Baker, 
Rudy Bruns, Frank Carramone, Roy 
Gates, Evan Griffith, Win. Parry Sr., 
Joseph Soldano, Michael Suraske and 
Fred Russo. 



the national labor movement. 

Presented special honors for long ten- 
ure of district service were Walter C. 
Borchers, delegate and officer for 52 
years, and John E. Heimbrock, delegate 
and officer for 25 years. The honors pro- 
gram also included a presentation to Rus- 
sell Austin, senior district representative 
now in his eleventh year of office, for 
diligence in establishing the welfare and 
pension plan. Austin was called Mr. Pen- 
sion Plan. The wives of those honored 
were also given special presentations. 

Earl Reed, District Council president, 
presided. Toastmaster was District Sec- 
retary Albert C. Scheer. The invocation 
was said by Rev. Eugene H. Maley of 
Mt. St. Mary's Seminary. 

His honor, Cincinnati Mayor Walton 
Bachrach. presented the city's greetings, 
noting that the city has just marked its 
176th anniversary and that it was look- 
ing forward presently to a rebirth in 
which the craftsmanship of the Carpen- 
ters and all the building trades would 
take part. 

Finley C. Allan, First General Vice 
President of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America, was 
the chief speaker bearing the personal 
felicitations of General President Maurice 
A. Hutcheson. "Few organizations," said 
Allan, "can cite a record of 75 years of 
progress." He noted that carpenters here 
had six delegates at the founding conven- 
tion of the United Brotherhood. 

"This district," Allan continued, "has 
given many officers to the national 
Brotherhood and pioneered many new 
trade union activities." He cited D. P. 
Rowland, the Brotherhood's 6th General 
President; Al Fischer, 3rd General Secre- 
tary: J. H. Potts of the Executive Board; 
C. Conrad, Tom Murray and Robert 
Sauer, General Brotherhood Represent- 
atives. 

Present officers of the district are Earl 
Reed, president; Joe Bender, vice presi- 
dent; Albert C. Scheer, recording secre- 
tary; W. C. Borchers, financial secretary; 
John Heimbrock, treasurer; Ed Egan, 
conductor; Bert Knille, warden; John Mc- 
Elroy, reading clerk; Ed Huber, Jack 
Johns and Herbert D. Meyer, trustees. 

From the original Local 2 and Local 
209, the district now represents Locals 
2, 29, 224, 415, 873 and 1454, all of 
Cincinnati; 698, Newport; 703, Lockland; 




Special presentations were made to 
John Heimbrock, left, and Walter C. 
Borchers, center, for 25 and 50 years 
service, respectively, while serving as offi- 
cers and delegates of the Ohio Valley 
District Council. On the right, making 
the presentation, is First General Vice 
President Finley C. Allen. 




District Secretary Albert C. Scheer, 
right, presents a watch to Russell Austin, 
business representative, for establishing 
the pension plan for the district. 

712, Covington; 739, College Hill; 785. 
Erlanger; 854, Madisonville; 869, Chev- 
iot; 1206, Norwood; 1477, Middletown, 
and 1602, Price Hill. 

Wages have increased from 20 cents 
an hour in 1881 to $4.27 plus 15 cents 
toward a pension fund. 



APRIL, 1965 



29 



You Can Be 
a Highly Paid 

CONSTRUCTION 

COST 

ESTIMATOR 



If you have the ambition to become the top 
man on the payroll — or if you are planning 
to start a successful contracting business of 
your own — we can teach you everything you 
need to know to become an expert construc- 
tion cost estimator. A journeyman carpenter 
with the equivalent of a high schooJ education 
is well qualified to study our easy-to-understand 
home study course, Construction Cost Esti~ 
mating. 

WHAT WE TEACH 

We teach you to read plans and specifications, 
take off materials, and figure the costs of ma- 
terials and labor. You prepare complete esti- 
mates from actual working drawings just like 
those you will find on every construction proj- 
ect. You learn how to arrive at the bid price 
that is correct for work in your locality based 
on your material prices and wage rates. Our 
course is seJf-teaching. After you study each 
lesson you correct your own work by compar- 
ing it to sample estimates which we supply. 
You don't need to send lessons back and forth ; 
therefore you can proceed at your own pace. 
When you complete this course you will know 
how to estimate the cost of all types of con- 
struction : residences, schools, churches, and in- 
dustrial, commercial, and institutional build- 
ings. Our instructions are practical and com- 
plete. We show you exactly how to proceed, 
step by step, from the time you unroJl the 
plans until you actually submit your proposal. 

ACCURATE LABOR COST DATA 

The labor cost data which we supply is not 
vague and theoretical — it is correct for work 
in your locality — we leave nothing to guess- 
work. Instead of giving you a thousand rea- 
sons why it is difficult to estimate construction 
costs accurately, we teach you how to arrive 
at a competitive bid price — low enough to get 
the job — high enough to realize a profit. 

STUDY WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

You don't need to pay us one cent until you 
first satisfy yourself that our course is what 
you need and want. We will send you plans, 
specifications, estimate sheets, material and 
labor cost data, and complete instructions for 
ten days study ; then if you are not convinced 
that our course will advance you in the build- 
T ng business, just return what we have sent 
you and there is no obligation whatever. If 
you decide to study our course, pay us $13.25 
monthly for three months, a total of only 
$39.75. 

Send your name and address today — we will 
do the rest. 



CONSTRUCTION COST INSTITUTE 

Dept. C-465— University Station 
Denver, Colorado 80210 



Cheyenne Local Makes Pin Presentations 




CHEYENNE, WYO.— Local 469, Cheyenne, presented 23 pins to those members 
with 25 or more years of service in the International Union and two pins for 50 or 
more years. 

Front row, left to right are: Lawrence R. Rc.nl/. Louis Neth and Oliver Sommers. 
Second row: John H. Southworth, Emerson Alderman, Ray Condra, William H. Reid, 
Fred Ford and Harry B. Barnes. Back row: Everett E. Shores, Wm. E. DeFond, 
H. G. Wagner, M. A. Young, H. E. Thompson and John H. Witt. 

Some were unable to attend the award presentation, but were given their pins at 
home. They were: A. M. Londen, J. A. Gaukel, Gust Jerp, Ralph R. Roberts, L. A. 
Burr, Wm. M. Harris, O. L. Loshbaugh and Arthur E. Nelson. 

Fifty-year pins were presented to Brothers A. Mallalieu and Emil Olson. 

Local 1386 Honors Two Past Presidents 




ST. JOHN, N.B. — Local 1386 of Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, recently made 
a presentation of 25-year pins and two past president pins. After the presentations 
were made, members of Ladies Auxiliary 535 served refreshments. 

Those receiving pins were, in front from left: Brothers Herbert Jessome and Harold 
Quinri. both past presidents; standing, from left are: Colin Gilker, Frank Doiron, 
George Marr, Ernest Cameron and Ernest Marr (all receiving 25-year pins). 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



Eight Decades of Service Commemorated at Wheeling 




WHEELING, W. VA. — Carpenters Local 3 officers and members celebrated its eightieth year as a chartered local union 
(charter issued May, 1885) by honoring members who have been in continuous membership for 25 years or more. 

Members and guests attended a special meeting at which Andrew G. Myers, Jr., executive secretary of the Steel Valley Dis- 
trict Council, served as toastmaster. International Representative Charles Slinker delivered the main address and presented 
the membership pins to the honored members. 

The meeting was followed by a dinner and social gathering, which had been arranged by business representative Thomas 
Baron and his committee. 

The honored members, officers of Local 3 and guests shown are seated left to right: R. H. Moore, 30 years membership; 
Edward Smith, 29 years; H. E. Sutton, 30 years; Dana Dayton, 29 years; Donald Miller, 29 years; Frank Cornwell, 43 years; 
Joseph Bott, 26 years; Stephen Shepherd, 26 years; James Myers, 28 years. Standing from left are: Andrew G. Myers, Jr., 
executive secretary of the Steel Valley District Council; Jack Hossman, trustee; Ed Magers, vice president; William Roberts, 
treasurer; M. J. Petrock, recording secretary, 26 years; C. M. Slinker, general representative; Kelcel Westfall, president; Thomas 
Baron, financial secretary and business representative; John Cramer, conductor; William Coen, 27 years; Arthur Strader, 27 
years; Harry Bushon, 25 years; William B. Cox, 27 years. Veteran carpenters not present for the picture included: Leo Mc- 
Donnell, 61 years; Frank Tisher, 52 years; Fred Bushon, 45 years; John Vance, 43 years; Russell Welshaw, 41 years; David 
Kemp, 29 years; Robert Jones, 29 years; Frank Byers, 29 years; Norman Steer, 28 years; Layman Burch, 27 years; William 
Bartsch, 27 years; Donald Wright, 26 years; Orval Kooli, 25 years; and R. B. Koon, 25 years. 



Contractors, Carpenters, Custom Filers . . . Save Time, Save Money with FAMOUS 

FOLEY Sharpening Equipment 




Foley automatic sharpening equipment has the skill to do a 
perfect job every time — NO "human error". And no experience 
is necessary to accomplish a professional job. All Foley equip- 
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Jk% 



314 GRINDER-Sharpens all types of 
circular saws— rip, crosscut or com- 
bination toothed — from 5" to 44" in 
diameter. Attachments available for a 
variety of other sharpening jobs. 



RETOOTHER AND POWER SETTER— 

Retoother cuts a full set of teeth, either 
rip or crosscut, in less than a minute. 
Operated either by motor or by hand 
crank. Power setter automatically sets 
band saws up to IVz" in width, as well 
as all carpenter's hand saws, either 




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* 



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LITERATURE TODAY! 1^- - tz?- ± 1 



APRIL, 1965 



31 




Quality Vaughan Hammers met up 
with the multi-purpose Superbar and 
created a tool box sensation . . . 
What a Vaughan Hammer can't do — 
Superbar can! 

Vaughan Hammers are the result 
of over ninety years of know-how in 
quality hand tool manufacturing. 
They're better built and better bal- 
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they're known as the "swingin'est" 
hammers made! And a hammer's first 
and best mate is the Vaughan Super- 
bar. It's the all-purpose tool that prys, 
lifts, scrapes, pounds, pulls, and even 
cuts nails! You have to use Super- 
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And it fits in any tool box. 

When you buy, buy Vaughan quality 
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Write for details. 

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MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

135 S. LaSalle Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60603 



Golden Gate Piledrivers' Annual Luncheon 




SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.— Piledrivers Local 34 of San Francisco recently held 
its Old Timers 9th Annual Luncheon. The event was well-attended with about 85 
members present to discuss the many jobs and struggles in past years to obtain the 
conditions and benefits now enjoyed by labor. 



Service Awards Presented by Local 503 




BUFFALO. N. Y. — Six members of Local 503, Buffalo, have received their 25-year 
pins. Herman J. Bodewes, business representative, made the presentations. From the 
left are: Willard Willison, Emmett Drilling, Peter Feiner, Mr. Bodewes, Grant 
LaVigne, Stanley Derejko and Stanley Kocialski. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 



Armco Steel 25 

Audel, Theodore 35 

Belsaw (Multi-Duty) 33 

Belsaw (Sharp-All) 23 

Chicago Technical College . . 13 

Cline-Sigmon 33 

Construction Cost Institute . . 30 

Eliason Stair Gauge 34 

Estwing Manufacturing 16 

Foley Manufacturing 31 

Hydrolevel 35 



Lee, H. D 15 

Miller Sewer Rod 34 

Siegele, H. H 22 

Stanley Works Back Cover 

Technical Home Study 

(Locksmithing) 15 

Technical Home Study 

(Upholstery) 23 

Union Industries Show 22 

Vaughan & Bushnell 32 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



18 Members of Local 771 Represent 565 Years of Service 




WATSONVILLE, CALIF. — Local 771 of Watsonville recently presented continuous membership pins to 18 members whose 
total years of service added up to 565 years. Membership pins were presented by Russel S. Hansen, president of the Monterey 
Bay District Council. 

Front row, from the left are: Dan Mattos, Manuel Santos, Virgil Stringari, president of Local 771; G. L. De Wald, secretary- 
treasurer of Monterey County Building Trades Council and delegate to the Central Labor Council; Hansen, J. W. King, former 
president of the local; Harold Buchter, treasurer. Back row, from left, Ted Burt, Albert Marshall, Jack Sprague, Tony Ber- 
nardo, George Nichols and Kenneth Highman. 



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Local 450 Burns 
Mortgage in Ceremony 




OGDEN, U.— January 15, 1965, was an 
eventful evening for Local 450, Ogden, 
at which time the members enjoyed an 
evening of dancing and entertainment in 
honor of the charter issued to the local 
on January 17, 1900. During intermis- 
sion the release of the mortgage, which 
had been on their building since its con- 
struction in 1958, was read by Brother 
Ellis J. Rees, financial secretary, and 
turned over to President Roland Tueller, 
at which time Brother Tueller performed 
the fire ceremony and burned the mort- 
gage. 

At intermission twenty-five year mem- 
bership pins were awarded to two mem- 
bers in attendance, Brother Andrew Rob- 
ertson (left) and Brother Dan Benson 
(right). Seated in the center is President 
Roland Tueller. Two twenty-five year 
members were absent: Brothers Ralph 
Powell and Bote Dokter. 

ATTEND THE 1965 UNION INDUSTRIES 
SHOW, PITTSBURGH, MAY 21-26 



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Paul C. Pedersen of Local Union 1456. New York. N. Y., arrived at the 
Home Februarj 10, 1965. 

William J. Struthers of Local Union 2217. Lakeland, Fla., arrived at the 
Home February 12. 1965. 

Arthur C. Tagtmeyer of Local Union 61. Kansas City. Missouri, arrived 
at the Home February 16. 1965. 

Fred C. Mellon of Local Union 624. Brockton. Mass., arrived at the Home 
February 24. 1965. 

Fritz E. Lange of Local Union 81, Erie. Pa., passed away February 14. 
1965. and was buried at Erie Pa. 

E. M. Moxley of Local Union 1723. Columbus. Ga., passed away Febru- 
ary 18. 1965. and was buried at Birmingham. Ala. 

Richard Carton of Local Union 188. Yonkers, N. Y., passed away February 
25. 1965. and was buried at Yonkers, N. Y. 

Michael Lavin of Local Union 2250. Red Bank. N. L. passed away Feb- 
ruary 17. 1965. and was buried in the Home cemetery. 

Union Members Who Visited the Home During February 

Benchard Soro. L.U. 2305, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Clarence W. Newhouser, L.U. 492, Reading, Pa. 

George C. Wagner, L.U. 429. Montclair. N. J., now living Haworth. fi. J. 

John Halonen. L.U. 8. Philadelphia Pa. 

Charles Snow, L.U. 15, Zephyrhills, Fla. 

Harry V. Cunningham. L.U. 1377. Buffalo, N. Y. 

Martin Christensen, L.U. 1433. Farmington, Mich. 

Thomas Vaksdal, L.U. 1161, Morris. 111. 

Martin Carlson. L.U. 58. Skokie. 111. 

J. D. Hedges. L.U. 1419. Sewald. Pa. 

Robert Hackenberger, L.U. 187, Thompsontown, Pa. 

Monroe H. Clausen, L.U. 492, Reading, Pa. 

Martin Du Graef. L.U. Paterson. N. J. 

Joseph F. Slanec, L.U. 357, Long Island. N. Y. 

Joseph J. Slavinsky. L.U. 357, Long Island. N. Y. 

Eric Johnson. L.U. 62, Chicago. 111. 

Bennett B. Gomolka. L.U. 101. Baltimore, Md. 

W. Kolsted. L.U. 62, Chicago. 111. 

John Kertulla. L.U. 94, Foster. R. I. 

Denis McNamara, L.U. 608, New York City, N.Y. 

Anthony F. Olivio, L.U. 94, Providence. R. I. 

G. Fujita, L.U. 27, Scarboro. Ont., Canada 

Carl Lewton, L.U. 143, Massillon, Ohio 

James Hoalson. L.U. 429, Montclair, N. J. 

Robert Nyberg, L.U. 232, Ft. Wayne. Ind. 

Hilmer L. Carlson. L.U. 141. Chicago, 111. 

Herman A. Saakre, L.U. 661. Ottawa. 111. 

Theodore Bethke, L.U. 13. Chicago, 111. 

Richard N. Leeds, L.U. 1489, Burlington, N. J. 

Louis Albine. L.U. 94, Providence, R. I. 

Engvald Everson. L.U. 20, Staten Island, N. Y., now living Gulfport, Fla. 

Axel Hansen, L.U. 2305. Brooklyn, N. Y., now living St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Bertil Patterson, L.U. 257, Baldwin, N. Y. 

Paul M. Lucas, L.U. 60, Indianapolis. Ind. 

Bernard M. Orville, L.U. 860, Framington, Mass. 

E. E. Wales, L.U. 559, Gary, Ind. 

Geo. E. Lockwood, L.U. 210. Stamford. Conn. 

Arne G. Peterson. L.U. 1590. Washington, D. C. 

John Sollie. L.U. 7, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Burrel Ruffner. L.U. 136, Newark, Ohio 

John I. Clauson. L.U. 10, Chicago, 111. 

Dody Jacobs, L.U. 1301. Monroe. Mich. 

Jack Greenwood, L.U. 494, Windsor, Ont., Canada 

H. Carood, U. U. 1305. Fall River, Mass. 

Charles F. Carter, L.U. 1622, Palo Alto. Calif. 

Edwin Marso. L.U. 1345, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Gust Shoberg. L.U. 181. Chicago, 111., now living Lindstrom, Minn. 

Henry E. Meyer, L.U. 181, Skokie, 111. 

R. J. Yelle. L.U. 1035. Taunton, Mass. 

Lloyd Womack, L.U. 1033, Niles. Mich. 

Melvin Paulson. L.U. 1573, Pewaukee, Wise. 

Dave O'Connell, Chicago, 111., Washington, D. C. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



LAKELAND NEWS cont'd- 



Harry Christensen. L.U. 20, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Thomas P. Farney, L.U. 16, Springfield, 111. 

Leonard C. Kelley. L.U. 662, Mt. Morn's, N. Y. 

John Strombeck, L.U. 1, Chicago, III. 

Albin H. Anderson. L.U. 33, Boston, Mass. 

Gustaf Adolph Anderson, L.U. 429, Montclair, N. J. 

Patrick J. Wolven, L.U. 2161, Catskill, N. Y. 

John H. Mutle. L.U. 1856, Chotten Raven, Pa. 

Val Codding, L.U. 33, Boston, Mass., now living Framingham, Mass. 

Robert C. Moores, L.U. 40, Dracut, Mass. 

Eugenio Bianchi. L.U. 299. Fairview, N. J. 

Kelsey Thomas. L.U. 215, Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Knut Marjanen, L.U. 1921. Hempstead,"*N. Y. 

Harvey Thaumot, L.U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 

Frank Dickenson. L.U. 16. Springfield. 111. 

Carl Carlson, L.U. 284, New York, N. Y. 

Charles Rudy, L.U. 1462, Bristol, Pa. 

B. O. Lofgren, L.U. 58. Chicago, III. 

Luther Kelley, L.U. 508. Marion. 111. 

Joseph Heck, L.U. 514. Wilkes Barre. Pa. 

Herman Christensen. L.U. 1973. Long Island, N. Y. 

August Strode, L.U. 1837, Long Island, N. Y. 

George Chafin. L.U. 608, New York, N. Y. 

Herman Bieling, L.U. 1062, Santa Barbara, Calif., now living Boynton 

Beach, Fla. 
Joseph Caron, L.U. 1305, Fall River, Mass. 
Charles Beyer. L.U. 104. Dayton. Ohio 

A. N. Houser, L.U. 50. Knoxville. Tenn., now living Maryville, Tenn. 
J. Trivett, L.U. 349, Bloomfield, N. J. 
Stephen F. Glanina, L.U. 1772, Hicksville, N. Y. 

Rodney Knight, L.U. 1681, Hornell, N. Y., now living Canisteo. N. Y. 
Andy C. Weber, L.U. 912, Richmond, Ind., now living Laurel, Ind. 
Olaf Ekstrand, L.U. 105, Cleveland, Ohio 
John Clarke. L.U. 165, Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Charles Palmer. L.U. 915. Detroit. Mich. 
Wm. T. Straham, L.U. 972, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Charles Messenger. L.U. 1175 Kingston, N. Y. 
Oscar L. Howard, L.U. 1319, Albuquerque, N. M. 
George E. Lagarce, L.U. 444, Lenox, Mass. 
W. Lee Sorrell, Sr., L.U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
Arvid Gustefson, L.U. 62, Chicago. 111. 
Leonard Barbato, L.U. 1209, East Orange, N. J. 
Vincent J. McCann. L.U. 49. Howell. Mass. 
Harney Pickney. L.U. 335. Grand Rapids. Mich. 
Maurice Carey, L.U. 630. Neenah, Wise. 
Lars Hommeland, L.U. 1367, Chicago. 111. 
Fred Petrone. L.U. 781, Mon. Jet., N. J. 
Jack Schwarzer, L.U. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 
David Johnson, L.U. 504, Chicago, 111. 
Robert Sweeten. L.U. 272, Chicago, III. 
John Wilda, L.U. 183, Peoria. 111. 
Mr. Melvin. L.U. 586. Sacramento. Calif. 
Fred J. Clauson. L.U. 181. Chicago. 111. 
J. Chester Ploss, L.U. 61, Raytown, Mo. 
Reuben Kyson, L.U. 1743, Wildwood, N. J. 
O. Larsen, L.U. 787. New York, N. Y. 
Henry Beckmann, L.U. 58, La Grange, Park. 111. 
Wm. P. Plajer. L.U. 1023. Alliance, Ohio 
John H. Carlgren. L.U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
Fred Vincent, L.U. 1138, Toledo, Ohio 
Eugene Wolfe, L.U. 333, New Kensington. Pa. 
T. A. Carmichael, L.U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
Milo Kataja, L.U. 2006, Los Gatos, Calif. 
John A. Lang, L.U. 1134, Katanah, N. Y. 
Oscar J. Jutzi, Sr., L.U. 1527, Melbourne, Fla. 
Alfred W. Jutzi, L.U. 242. Downers Grove, 111. 
Richard H. Hannah, L.U. 115, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Suend A. Jensen, L.U. 91, Racine, Wise. 
Harold H. Housen, L.U. 132, Washington, D. C. 



J\UDEL 

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M. A. HUTCHESON, Genera/ President 

Resource Development Is Not 'Pork Barrel' 
Expenditure; It's Lasting Investment 



/~\NE OF THE THORNIEST PROBLEMS fac- 
^-^ ing Congress is how much money to allocate to 
public works programs. 

Each Congressman, naturally, has a pet project 
or two he wants initiated in his district. Critics of 
specific projects often apply the term "pork barrel" 
to these items. 

However, it takes tragedy or near-tragedy to drive 
home the lesson that flood control projects, harbor 
improvements, etc., are sound investments; not boon- 
doggles. 

During the holiday season last year, the West Coast 
was hit by the worst flood in a generation. Forty lives 
were lost, 1600 people were injured, and half a bil- 
lion dollars worth of damage was done. Nine com- 
munities were wiped out completely. 

Bad as the situation was, experts estimate that 
another $750,000,000 to $1,000,000,000 worth of 
damage would have been done had it not been for 
state and federal flood control facilities completed in 
previous years. 

The bulk of the damage occurred in areas with 
inadequate or no flood control facilities. An esti- 
mated $100,000,000 worth of damages occurred along 
North California coastal streams and another $50,- 
000,000 occurred on the Rogue and Umpqua Rivers 
in Oregon, where flood control facilities do not exist. 

By way of contrast, California's Sacramento Valley, 
because of its levee and by-pass systems, escaped 
tremendous damage. Portland, Oregon, was hard hit 



by the flood, but engineers believe that the city would 
have been totally inundated without the up-stream 
flood control facilities. All railway lines would have 
been washed out or damaged to greater or lesser de- 
grees. Debris in the river could have taken out bridges 
along both the Columbia and the Willamette. 

Without up-stream dams which held back torrents 
of water, Eugene and Salem, Oregon; Vancouver, 
Washington; and Reno, Nevada, would have been 
severely battered. 

In the light of these evaluations by experts, the 
West Coast flood control projects authorized by pre- 
vious sessions of Congress paid for themselves in a 
single week. The projects authorized this year will 
do the same thing in future decades. 

The amount of work needed to protect the re- 
sources and cities of the nation is almost endless. 
Money spent to prevent floods, purify polluted streams, 
keep rivers navigable, etc., really comes under the 
heading of investment rather than expenditure. 

A growing population keeps increasing the pres- 
sure on our natural resources. We need to keep de- 
veloping and conserving them at the fastest possible 
rate. Every project to do a job becomes more ex- 
pensive each year it is delayed. Consequently, the 
charges of "pork barrel" cannot be allowed to deter 
Congress from doing those things which can save the 
lives of our people and protect the economic health 
of all regions. 

The citizens of Portland, Eugene, and Salem, Ore- 
gon, will certify to this fact. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



GENERAL OFFICERS OF: 



GENERAL OFFICE: 



THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 101 Constitution Ave n.w 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Finlay C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W.. 

Washington. D. C. 20001 



second general vice president 
William Sidell 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington. D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Tep.zick 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 

Third District, Harry Schwarzer 
16678 State Road, North Royalton, Ohio 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16, Minn. 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 10, Mo. 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 

1126 American Bank Bldg., 

621 S. W. Morrison St.. Portland 5, Ore 

Eighth District, Patrick Hogan 
8564 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 7, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 



M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



WE NEED YOUR 

LOCAL UNION 

NUMBER 

Because we are chang- 
ing over our mail list to 
our new computer, it is 
impossible for us to add, 
subtract, or change an 
address if we do not have 
your Local Union num- 
ber. Therefore, if you 
want your name added to 
the mail list of the jour- 
nal, or if you want it 
taken off, or if you want 
your address changed, 
please include your Local 
Union No. in your re- 
quest. Thank you for 
your cooperation. 

PETER TERZICK 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 



NAME 



Local # 



OLD ADDRESS 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



City 



NEW ADDRESS 



Zone 



State 



-Local # 



City 



State 



Zip Code Number 



PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should he mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington. D. C. 20001 

BE SURE TO WRITE IN YOUR LOCAL UNION NUMBER 



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and impact when you hit a nail or a knot and 
patented Free-Start blade guard for smooth blade 
entry on angle cuts. The 7" and 7 l A" models also 
feature patented spring-steel base support for 
heavy-duty handling characteristics. The 8" model 
is so loaded with heavy-duty power and strength 
that you couldn't ask for more. And of course you 
get maximum cutting power and safety, perfect 
balance, and long service life ... no matter which 
of the three you match to your needs. So if you 
want the best in builders saws . . . see your sup- 
plier or write to: 



STANLEY POWER TOOLS, Division of The Stanley Works, New Britain, Connecticut 



THE 



STANLEY 



THE TOOL BOX OF THE WORLD 



WORKS 



"® 



Officio! Publication of the 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 



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jSTT 




FOUNDED 1881 



MAY, 1965 



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Star-spangled savings plan 

(How It can help you to a well-provided future) 



Most of us think about the future in terms 
of our families — paying off the mortgage, 
educating the children, providing a retire- 
ment income. 

But with the world the way it is today, 
it's almost impossible to make plans for 
your own future without considering the 
future of your country, too. 

When you buy U. S. Savings Bonds, 
your money takes on both jobs. It begins 
to grow, surely and steadily, to help you 
reach your savings goals and build your 
financial strength. 

At the same time, Uncle Sam uses these 
dollars to help reach our national goals of 
peace and security. 

Why not give your savings dollars this 




double assignment? You'll be joining mil- 
lions of American families who are invest- 
ing in their country's future — and you'll 
probably find that you feel pretty good 
about the whole thing. 



v 



^5*, The U. S. Government does not pay for this advertisement. 
**</c st*** service in cooperation with the Treasury Department and 



Quick facts about Series E Savings Bonds 

You get back $4 for every $3 at maturity (7% 

years) 

Your Bonds are replaced free if lost, destroyed 

or stolen 

You can get your money when you need it 

You pay no state or local income tax and can 

defer payment of federal tax until the Bonds are 

cashed 

Buy E Bonds for growth — H Bonds for current income 



Buy U.S. Savings Bonds 

STAR-SPANGLED SAVINGS PLAN 
FOR ALL AMERICANS 



It is presented as a public 
The Advertising Council. 




THE 



<3/a\D3U> 




VOLUME LXXXV 



NO. 5 



MAY, 1965 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Acting Editor 



«» 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

We're Running Out of Clean Water 

Buried Alive for Three Days Einar Myllyla 6 

To the Memory of O. William Blaier 10 

Brotherhood Tallies $375,900 Red Cross Aid 12 

The Most Hallowed Ground 14 

Labor Members Named to Jurisdictional Boards 18 

Long-Time Lakeland Superintendent Retires 20 

How Good a Driver Are You? 21 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 9 

Editorials 13 

Home Study Course 19 

Plane Gossip 22 

Canadian Section 24 

Local Union News 26 

In Memoriam 33 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 35 

Lakeland News 37 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 357? should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W.. Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N. E., Washington. D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid' at Washington 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20* in advance! 

Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

In the high reaches of Oregon's 
wild country, the Rogue River runs 
clear and clean. Fed by the rainfall 
and the melting snows of a watershed 
which reaches into Crater Lake Na- 
tional Park, the Rogue offers the 
plentiful bounty of one of our most 
precious natural resources — a resource 
which is rapidly being overwhelmed by 
man's waste. 

Better treated than many of our 
largest streams, the Rogue nourishes 
a thriving community of wildlife, 
ministers to the increasing needs of 
man for water and provides man an 
opportunity for relocation. 

Not so with too many of our large 
watercourses. Almost every major 
river in the East, and even the mighty 
Columbia and others in the West, are 
becoming so befouled with untreated 
or only partially treated wastes from 
cities, farms and factories, that a 
catastrophic water shortage is just 15 
years or so away. 

The scope of the problem — why 
we're running out of clean water. 
what we're doing to catch up with 
past sins, and a hint of the monu- 
mental work yet to be done just to 
stay even with pollution — is examined 
in detail in this issue of The Carpen- 
ter. 

Our cover picture is reprinted from 
National Wildlife, official publication 
of the National Wildlife Federation. 
It is a Bureau of Land Management 
photograph. 




We're Running Out of Clean Water; 
What Is Your Community Doing About It? 



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FEDERAL FUNDS AVAILABLE; BOND ISSUES AND WORK PROJECTS NEEDED 



IN Yellowstone National Park, icy 
cold rivulets of crystal-pure water 
carom down the precipitous flanks of 
the Rockies to feed the first two links 
in a major U.S. watercourse. Shoshone 
and Lewis Lakes, sparkling gems of 
clean water, are home to the moun- 
tain trout, the moose, elk, deer and 
bear, and offer peace and solitude to 
travelers lucky enough to get a glimpse 
of its natural beauty. 

But by the time this clean water 
has merged with the mighty Columbia 
and run its course to the sea, it has 
become almost unbelievably foul. Be- 
cause of pollutants added by commu- 
nities and industries along the way, 
fish die for lack of oxygen and food. 
Commercial fishermen, groping near 
the mouth of the Columbia for the 
few fish left, can barely raise their 
nets because of the added weight of 
the pollution sludge which encrusts 
them. 

The picture is not a pretty one. but 
it's almost universal. Everywhere on 
the face of the earth man is rapidly 
turning one of his major resources — 
probably the most important and in- 
dispensible — into a useless burden. 

In earlier times, the supply of clean 



water seemed inexhaustible, and there 
was, indeed, enough of it to accept 
the added burden of man's waste and 
still remain pure. Animal and bacteria 
life, sunlight and oxygen purified it. 

Today, incredible as it may seem 
in the face of the immense quantities 
around us, we are running out of 
clean water. Experts estimate that by 
1980, there won't be a single unused 
drop available in the United States! 

While the amount of rainfall stays 
the same, the population grows. The 
150 million Americans of 1950 have 
become 194 million today, and will 
more than likely increase to 260 mil- 
lion just fifteen years from now. Com- 
pounding the problem is the tremen- 
dous jump in the amount of water 
each individual uses. 

With the coming of home laundries, 
garbage disposers, second and third 
bathrooms in the home, broad lawns 
that need watering, per person use has 
increased 4 times since 1900. Your 
family, if it comes close to the U.S. 
average, uses 600 gallons of water 
each day. Just try lugging that from 
the well. 

With industrialization, too, has come 
a large, additional drain on clean 



water supplies. U.S. industry uses 11 
times as much water now as it did in 
1900. Agriculture, since the introduc- 
tion of modern irrigation practices, is 
using 7 times more than at the turn 
of the century. 

To do the essential job of support- 
ing life, water must be clean, whether 
its been used before or not. Already, 
in some parts of the country, there 
isn't enough "new" water to go around. 
Every drop of the Ohio River is used 
3.7 times before it gets to the Missis- 
sippi. The Mahoning River in Ohio 
is used 8 times before it gets to 
Youngstown. In some communities, 
inorganic detergents, extremely diffi- 
cult to remove from used water, put 
a head on water coming out of the 
kitchen tap, and many of the major 
rivers in the East froth wherever they 
tumble and churn. 

Aside from the repulsive aesthetic 
aspects of dirty water, there are com- 
pelling practical reasons why it must 
be clean before it is returned to human, 
industrial and agricultural use. 

The most obvious is disease. Live 
viruses and bacteria dumped into the 
source of drinking and bathing water 
still fell and kill Americans. 



THE CARPENTER 



In addition, organic wastes sap the 
oxygen from water, taking away both 
marine life and the ability of water to 
purify itself. 

Part of the water cleansing job is 
handled at the intake end, through 
purification, but these plants can cope 
with only limited amounts of pollution. 
Some of the newer pollutants cannot 
be removed at all with our present 
knowledge. The biggest challenge, and 
the only opportunity for eventual suc- 
cess in the fight against pollution, is 
at the waste discharge end of our water 
systems. 

Right now, one out of every three 
people in the U.S. is not served by 
any kind of municipal sewage system. 
In remote areas, where adequate pre- 
cautions have been taken to separate 
water supply and septic fields, the sup- 
ply may be safe, but there is serious 
concern with the safety of 6 million 
people, living in smaller communi- 
ties, where wastes are discharged raw 
without any kind of treatment. 

The U.S. Division of Water Supply 
and Pollution Control of the Public 
Health Service calculates that 127 mil- 
lion people have "adequate" waste 
treatment facilities in their communi- 
ties, while another 18.6 million are 
served by below-par systems. 

In more than 1900 communities, 
with populations of almost 40 million, 
sewage and surface runoff are carried 
in the same lines. During dry periods, 
the treatment plants can handle the 
quantities involved. But when there 
is heavy rainfall, some of the flow 



must be diverted to the nearest water- 
course, untreated. As these communi- 
ties grow, which they are constantly 
doing, the normal load approaches 
always nearer the overload point. 
Without system modification, raw 
sewage eventually will be going into 
the watercourses the year round. These 
combined systems represent the most 
serious immediate municipal waste 
challenge. 

Even some of the "adequate" plants 
which remove around 90 per cent of 
the organic wastes — are not good 
enough. Chicago, which has one of 
the best treatment plants in the coun- 
try, pours treated wastes equal to raw 
waste from a million people into the 
Illinois River every day. 

Sewage, of course, is not the only 
kind of pollution. In terms of total 
impact, industrial wastes are worse. 
The organic pollution from industry — 
animal and vegetable material from 
industries such as food processing, 
textiles and paper manufacturers — 
chokes our national water courses with 
the equivalent of raw sewage from 
160 million people. This is just about 
double the present raw amount from 
our cities. By 1980, while population 
will go up about 70 million, industrial 
organic waste is expected to increase 
by the equivalent of another 160 mil- 
lion people. 

Inorganic industrial waste — minerals 
and chemicals which are the by-prod- 
ucts of mining, metal, manufacturing 
and chemical industries — give water 
offensive colors, odors and taste. They 



Discharging into the Missouri River, this city sewer carries storm water, sewage and 
industrial waste. Fish and wildlife along the waterway suffer, in addition to man. 



POINTERS FOR 
COMMUNITY ACTION 

Alarmed about the increasingly 
critical water supply problem, a 
number of organizations are co- 
operating with the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Health, Education, and 
Welfare to promote participation 
in the Federal pollution control 
assistance program. The hope is 
that by pointing out the magnitude 
of the problems and suggesting a 
course of local community action 
open to each citizen greater par- 
ticipation will result. All of these 
organizations suggest: 

1. Finding out what's needed in 
your community. 

2. Publicizing the shortcomings 
and needs. 

3. Getting out the vote to back 
bond issues which will enable the 
community to take advantage of 
Federal grants. 

The Incentive Grant Program is 
administered jointly by the Pub- 
lic Health Service of HEW and 
water pollution control agencies 
in all 50 states and Puerto Rico. 
Guam and the Virgin Islands. Ap- 
plication forms and related ma- 
terials are normally obtained from 
the state agencies. For information 
about the Federal program, write 
to the Division of Water Supply 
and Pollution Control, Public 
Health Service, Washington D. C. 
20201. 

Among the helpful materials 
available are several brochures: 

NEEDED: CLEAN WATER, 
published by the Channing L. Bete 
Company, Inc., Greenfield, Mass. 
01301, in cooperation with the Na- 
tional Wildlife Federation. 25 cents 
each. Bulk discounts on quantities 
over 10. 

FOCUS ON CLEAN WATER; 
Public Health Service Publication 
No. 1184, available from the Gov- 
ernment Printing Office, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 20402 for 20 cents. 

BUILDING FOR CLEAN WA- 
TER, Public Health Service Pub- 
lication No. 867, available from 
the Government Printing Office, for 
10 cents. 




MAY, 1965 




WHAT IT COSTS 

A community of 10.000 popula- 
tion, Heath, Ohio, recently com- 
pleted its first sewerage system at 
a cost of $1.6 million. The city 
had been totally without sewers 
and treatment plant before the 
construction job was finished in 
1964. except for a few private lines 
running into several nearby creeks. 
With future growth in mind, the 
sewers were built to handle a pop- 
ulation of 25.000. The sewage 
treatment plant, as is often done 
today, was built to handle the 
existing population, with provi- 
sions for simple addition of more 
units as population grows. 

Out of the total cost, about $1 
million went for the sewers, and 
$600,000 for the treatment plant. 
About 20 miles of sewers were laid, 
ranging in size from 6-inch vitrified 
clay pipe for service to property 
lines to 24-inch mains. 

The treatment plant delivers 90- 
95 per cent effective treatment of 
the sewage. In a typical arrange- 
ment, the sewage comes in through 
a wet well, where it is partially dis- 
integrated by a large grinder-mixer. 
It then goes to one of three pumps, 
from 3-5 horsepower, to be lifted 
to primary settlement tanks. There 
are two of these, each one 15 by 
42 feet, and over nine feet deep. 
From the primary settling tanks, 
sewage flows to the two much larg- 
er aeration tanks, 16 by 112 feet, 
where air is blown across it. After 
aeration, the sewage goes to two 
final settling tanks, about the same 
size as the primary tanks, and is 
then pumped to the primary and 
secondary digesters — round tanks 
40 feet in diameter with a depth of 
over 20 feet. A 500.000 BTU heater 
on the first digester speeds up na- 
tural decomposition, aided by a 
continuous mixer. 

Some of the liquid remaining is 
shunted back to the intake well, and 
the sludge from the secondary di- 
gester is pumped out to eight open 
sludge drying beds. Each bed is 
25 by 100 feet. 



introduce hardness and corrosive qual- 
ities. Many of them interfere with 
normal waste treatment processes and 
some are toxic or poisonous. 

Much of the most puzzling inor- 
ganic pollution is traced to the chemi- 
cal industry. The speed of progress in 
the industry has far outstripped our 
knowledge of methods to combat the 
new pollutants. There arc no known 
means of detecting some of them, and 
the effect of many on man anil animals 
has not even been measured before 
they are pumped into the water 
courses. 

Another "waste" product of indus- 



rcmove, and the number of contribu- 
ting factors — weapons testing, radio- 
active material mining and refining, 
new industrial medical and research 
uses of radioactive materials — is in- 
creasing rapidly. 

Also on the rise is pollution from 
pesticides and insecticides more are 
being used, and they arc generally 
more potent than earlier chemicals. 
Most of our major rivers have detected 
amounts of pesticides, and they are 
only partly removed by ordinary waste 
treatment processes. So far, concen- 
trations are below the danger level, 
but the hazard will become more seri- 








Sludge thickening tanks of a Mansfield, Ohio, treatment plant. 



try is heat. The return of cooling 
water from both industries and power 
plants reduces the amount of oxygen 
the water can hold, in effect increasing 
pollution. Heat is also added to the 
natural storehouse of water by dams 
constructed for power, irrigation, nav- 
igation, flood control and water sup- 
ply. The shallow basins soak up more 
sunlight than water running naturally 
in deep channels. 

Ironically, the water needs of in- 
dustry are as critical as those of hu- 
man beings, and industry gulps it in 
great quantities. It takes seven gallons 
of water to make one gallon of gaso- 
line: 200 gallons for a dollar's worth 
of paper; and 65,000 gallons to make 
one automobile. 

Delicate chemical reactions can be 
upset by traces of impurities and min- 
erals in steam water encrusts boilers 
and pipes. 

The newest form of pollution is 
radioactivity. Although it is well be- 
low the safe allowable concentrations 
at the present time, this menace must 
be carefully watched because the ef- 
fect on man is cumulative. Radio- 
activity is difficult and expensive to 



ous with time. 

Fortunately, the pollution picture 
is not entirely bleak. Great strides 
are already being made. Along the 
Missouri River, for example, where 
every major city discharged raw sew- 
age into the mainstream ten years 
ago, four major population centers 
have either built or are building treat- 
ment plants, and the meat packing 
plants in the vicinity have improved 
greatly. 

A National Technical Task Com- 
mute on Industrial Pollution has been 
set up since 1950 by industry, and 
is working with the Federal Govern- 
ment to thrash out ways to attack in- 
dustrial pollution. 

The Federal Government has given 
the municipal pollution problem a big 
push with its 1956 Federal Water 
Pollution Control Act and subsequent 
related bills. The Government's pro- 
gram is aimed at catching up with 
the backlog of sewage control facili- 
ties which should have been built long 
ago. Federal spending, right now, is 
over $100 million a year, and will con- 
tinue through 1967 under the existing 
laws. Money is alloted to the states 



THE CARPENTER 



on the basis of population and per 
capita income, and the Federal Gov- 
ernment pays for 30 per cent of the 
cost of a sewer treatment plant, up 
to $600,000. 

This has proven to be a powerful 
stimulus, especially since passage of 
the 1962 and 1963 laws providing ad- 
ditional money. Cities are now invest- 
ing over $600 million a year in build- 
ing or rebuilding treatment plants and 
sewer lines. In 1963 just after passage 
of the Public Works Acceleration Act, 
and an increase of money under the 
old bill, municipal sewer work jumped 
25 per cent. Since the first act was 
passed, Federal money has helped 
5.617 communities construct facilities. 
The Federal Government contributed 





Above: New settling basins were added 
to the Washington, D. C. sewage treat- 
ment plant as a part of a recent $11 mil- 
lion expansion program. They typify con- 
struction needed to control pollution. At 
left: These 100-foot diameter sewage di- 
gester tanks were built as part of Birm- 
ingham, Alabama's improvement pro- 
gram. About 10,000 feet of form work 
was required for the first lift in each 
29-foot-high tank. 



$575 million, and state and local 
governments $2.15 billion. 

Even so, there are over 5,500 com- 
munities, serving 33 million people 
still in need of facilities to handle 
existing loads. To build treatment 
plants and sewers for them, and to 
modernize and maintain treatment 
works and sewers now in existence, 
would cost $2.2 billion more. 

Although the price tag seems high 
at first glance, it's very reasonable in 
comparison with other municipal fa- 
cilities such as hospitals and schools. 
While a typical community of 50.000 
may invest $102 per person in hos- 
pitals, and $303 in schools, only $36 
a person would be necessary to build 
a secondary treatment plant capable 
of removing about 90 per cent of the 
harmful pollutants. The 50,000-peo- 
ple community plant represents a total 
cost of about $1.8 million. For a small 
community, $50,000 might be enough. 

The greatest need right now is for 
separation of the combined sewer sys- 
tem. About 58 million people are now 
using these inadequate facilities, and 
to modernize them would cost about 
$8 billion. In most cases, new sanitary 
sewers would be needed, leaving the 



old systems for surface drainage only. 
The plumbing system within each 
building would have to be rearranged 
to separate rain water and sewage at 
its source. 

Despite recent progress in industrial 
pollution control, the Senate, in its 
1963 Pollution Study Report, noted, 
"The construction of needed industrial 
waste treatment facilities has never 
kept up with the increase in the num- 
ber of waste outlets nor with the in- 
crease in production of wastes. As 
with municipalities, this has resulted 
in a large backlog of construction 
needs." 

The Senate staff estimates that at 
least 6000 projects are necessary, and 
that annual spending should be at 
least as great as the funds allotted to 
municipal pollution control. 

Present government goals, in the 
entire municipal-aid program, are for 
only 80 per cent removal of organic 
wastes before discharge. As long as 
there is plenty of unspoiled water to 
dump into, we're in pretty good shape. 
However, in just 15 more years, the 
experts estimate, we'll run out of nat- 
ural streamflow sufficient to dilute 
and carry this waste. By 1980, a way 
must be found to bolster natural flow 



by 522 billion gallons a day. By 2000, 
the requirement will be a daily rate 
of 700 billion gallons. This increased 
flow can be provided by strategically- 
located reservoirs, to store water in 
wet periods for discharge during dry 
spells. Such a program will involve 
$12 billion worth of reservoir con- 
struction by 1980, and another $6 
billion to carry us through the year 
2000. 

Despite present spending by both 
federal, state and local governments 
of over $800 million each year, we're 
only treading water. While there has 
been overall improvement in the com- 
munities which already had sewer 
systems, facilities are falling behind 
population growth in those communi- 
ties without any kind of sewage sys- 
tem at all. 

There's absolutely no doubt about 
the seriousness and immediate impor- 
tance of the water pollution problem. 
Its solution requires the unified inter- 
est — and action — of people at all 
levels, from the smallest local govern- 
ment unit up to the Federal adminis- 
trative branch. Until our pollution 
control program catches up with our 
rate growth, our children stand a good 
chance of inheriting a foul wind. 



MAY, 1965 



Member of Vancouver local union 

skirts death by inches as a 

rescue team clears space for 

a helicopter landing pad overhead 




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for Three Days. 



BENEATH AN 



■ w ■ $ 



By EINAR MYLLYLA 

As Told to Albro Gregory 3 




I 



WASN'T AFRAID at anytime. I thought my 

friends would be there any minute to pull me 
out. I didn't know that I was slowly freezing to 
death. I didn"t hurt. 

I didn't know that the whole camp was swept 
away in the snow avalanche and that many of my 
buddies were dead. 

I had been walking across the snow to Bunk- 
house No. 4 to put in some shelves. The avalanche 
didn't make any noise. It hit me from behind. 
I can't remember much. 

I remember that I chopped at the snow with 
my hammer in the hand that wasn't pinned under 
me. But I guess I would pass out. And when 
I came to each time I thought I had just got there. 



I thought that when the fellas got to dinner they 
would see that I was gone, and they would find 
me. Then I guess I would pass out again. 

I remember when they found me. A guy looked 
down in my face. He said, 'Here's one,' and they 
loaded me on the helicopter. I can remember that. 
I can remember getting to the hospital and the 
doctor asking me where I hurt. I said I don't know. 

I came to the Granduc October first, last year. 
I guess I had been there longer than anyone when 
the slide hit. I had talked about leaving when we 
had a bunkhouse bull session the night before this 
thing happened. But then you always are talking 
about leaving. Sometimes you don't really mean 
it. 



THE CARPENTER 



Left: Einar Myllyla, member of 

Local Union 452, rests in the Ketchikan, 

Alaska, General Hospital as he recovers 

from injuries sustained when he 

was entombed beneath the snows of an 

avalanche near Stewart, B. C. 



Right: Bro. Myllyla's foot and hands, 

injured by frostbite during the 

days he was buried alive, are visible 

in photo by author Albro Gregory. 

Exclusive pictures and story by Gregory 

were taken and written especially 

for The CARPENTER. 




/ 



The money was good. I made 
$3.34 an hour. There was lots 
of overtime. You save all your 
money on a job like that. There 
is no place to go. You can't spend 
it. 

I signed up for the job in Win- 
nipeg, where I was living. I be- 
long to Local 452 of the Carpen- 
ters in Vancouver. I have be- 
longed all the time since I came 
to Canada in 1952. I was born 
in Finland. 

See how I can move these fin- 
gers? The medic says I'll be able 
to work again. I still got the 
thumb on that hand. Looks pretty 
good, eh? See, I can move the 
toes on that foot, too. I keep 
moving these things all the time 
I am awake. The doctor says 
I have to. 

Lots of people come to see me. 
Look at all the cookies and things 
these women have brought me. 
They bring me books. I like to 
read. There is a woman from 
Finland. She comes in every 
night. She writes my letters in 
Finn. I got a letter from my 
sister and brother in Finland and 
I got a lot of others, too. They 
are from all over the world. They 
even tell me how to get rid of this 
frost bite! 

I can get around pretty good 
in the walker. I talk to a lot of 
the other people around here. I 
don't get lonesome. I just wish 
I could remember more what hap- 
pened. They say I was under 
77 hours. I can't tell. 

They're real good to me here. 
I have special nurses. They give 




% 



me three baths a day in that whirl- 
pool tub. That helped me a lot. 
That tank thing sure was good 
for me. They say it saved my 
hand and leg. 

I'm going down to the hospital 
in Vancouver. That's where they'll 
decide what to do about those 
toes. The doc says that's where 
I'll get rehabilitated too. I like it 
here. But down there I've got a 
lot of buddies. 

Up here they give me a bottle 
of beer before I go to sleep each 
night. It's real nice. I can have 
steak or anything I want. 

EINAR MYLLYLA tells his story 
haltingly, like he's always digging 
for facts about the 77 hours he lay 
under tons of snow at the Granduc 
Mine near Stewart, B. C. It was 
on February 18 that the mountains, 
overburdened with snow, loosed their 
fury on the camp of about 160 men. 

So great was the weight of snow 
avalanche that it made matchwood 
of the buildings and threw most 
down the mountain three-quarters 
of a mile. 

But the most remarkable part 
was the survival of Einar Myllyla, 
the carpenter, who was caught from 
behind by the fury of the slide, then 
lay buried for about three days. 
When they found him, half frozen, 
it was February 21. 




\ 



Above: As he was wheeled into the Ketch- 
ikan hospital, Myllyla was unconscious. 
In his own account of his burial in a 
tomb of snow, he says he thinks he was 
unconscious most of the time. A bull- 
dozer uncovered his body, hidden beneath 
the snow! 

Below: With frostbitten hands exposed, 
Myllyla lies in oxygen tank flown in for 
him from Buffalo, N. Y. This exclusive 
picture taken by Albro Gregory. The 
avalanche killed 26 workers. 








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Members of (he Brotherhood arrive at Vancouver after escap- 
ing the avalanche which killed 26 and imprisoned Myllyla in 
an icy tomb for three days and three nights. From left arc 
Paul Yalkania, John Maconc, Ken I'.vnn, Henry Siemers, John 
Hovvett, Ola .lallinoja, Karl Kunz and Art Whittles. All are 
from L.U. 542 except Maconc, from Edmonton. The Granduc 
Mine is "in the heart of a heavy snow belt." 




Karl Kunz of L.U. 452 is greeted by his wife as he returned to 
Vancouver from the Granduc slide disaster. Every available 
man and piece of equipment went into action as the hunt for 
survivors of fatal avalanche got underway. P. Hacfclc and 
Uno Nyrhinen of L.U. 452 survived, as did L. Mack of L.U. 
1251. Herman Orlaw, Don MacKinnon and Stewart McLcod 
of L.U. 452 died in the disaster. 




From the time he was brought to 
Ketchikan General Hospital the best 
brains of medical science have been 
at work, first to save the life of 
the 38-year-old bachelor, then to 
save his limbs. 

Up to this time, medical science 
has largely succeeded. But it wasn't 
easy. 

The mine where Myllyla was 
working is situated 3,000 feet up 
on a mountain of the rugged Coastal 
Range. The camp is 30 miles north 
of the hamlet of Stewart, B. C, near 
the Alaska border. It is in the heart 
of a heavy snow belt. 

Granduc. now being developed, 
is said to contain one of the richest 
copper lodes ever discovered. Vir- 
tually the only access to the mine 
is by plane or helicopter. It will be 
that way until the company finishes 
the road to Stewart, which includes 
a tunnel 1 1 miles long. 

I have been close to Einar Myl- 
lyla ever since the disaster which 
claimed the lives of 26 of his bud- 
dies. I was there when he was lifted 
from the ambulance at the emer- 



At left: Tears of happiness flow as 
Brother Ken Pymi is greeted by bis 
daughter on his return to Vancouver. 
Many relatives did not know whether 
their husbands and fathers were 
dead or alive for long anxious hours. 



At right: Glad to be alive, bearded 

Henry Siemers of Local 452 walks 

away after clearing customs at 

Vancouver airport following flight from 

Ketchikan. — All photos on this page 

were taken by Carl Erickson, 

Financial Secretary of Local Union 452. 



gency entrance of Ketchikan Gen- 
eral Hospital and I was there when 
he was loaded aboard a plane for 
Vancouver on April 8. 

I saw Einar Myllyla gradually 
return to something like his old self. 
I saw him in the oxygen tank which 





was flown here from Buffalo, N. Y. 
to breathe new life into the near- 
dead tissues. I saw him when the 
frost was visible up to his elbows 
and up to his knees. 

Einar -is not a fellow with a gift 
of gab, so to speak. He measures 
each word carefully. So the whole 
story — as much as he can remember 
— has been a long time in coming 
out. 

Myllyla was entombed on his 
right side under about 10 feet of 
snow, his right arm pinned under 
him, his left free. 

He didn't know it, but workmen 
had smoothed out a space directly 
over him for an emergency heli- 
copter pad. He couldn't even. hear 
the whining of the engines. 

His rescuers were members of 
the Ketchikan Volunteer Rescue 
Squad, whose members come from 
all walks of life. They drop every- 
thing from axes to slide rules when- 
ever their services are needed, which 
is not infrequently in this rugged 
country. 

Continued on page 17 



8 



THE CARPENTER 







Washington ROUNDUP 




IN AREAS OF HEAVY RACIAL UNREST, people are going to pay a heavy economic price, 
Ewan Clague, Commissioner of Labor Statistics, recently told the world in a 
Voice of America Broadcast. "We have made studies of this," he said. "Results 
show that businessmen and industrialists are hesitant about investing in areas 
where there is a clear lack of racial harmony and tolerance. This means loss of 
jobs and purchasing power, a catastrophe for any community." 

THE NATION'S CAPITAL is not leading the nation in at least one type of legislation. 
F. H. McGuigan, AFL-CIO legislative representative, told a House Committee that 
thousands of workers in the District of Columbia are grossly underpaid and should 
have, at least, a minimum wage of $1.25 an hour and a 40-hour work week. 

USE OF POLYGRAPHS as "lie detectors" by Government agencies has been questioned 
by a House Subcommittee. The Subcommittee already has condemned abuse of such 
"detectors" and wants to have further information from the Defense Department, the 
National Security Agency, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. 

CONGRESS HAS SOME SKELETONS in its own closet, or rather in its kitchens, accord- 
ing to Senator Wayne Morse (D. -Oregon). In United States Senate facilities in 
Washington, Morse disclosed, men and women are toiling in the kitchens for less 
than the Federal minimum wage of $1 . 25-an-hour . In fact, some Senate restaurant 
and cafeteria employes are paid as little as $1.02-an-hour . 

THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA and the AFL-CIO have set up a program to expand union 
sponsorship of scouting, especially among boys from low-income families. Heading 
the program will be the first full-time Scout representative to the AFL-CIO, 
0. William Moody, Jr., who formerly served as secretary-treasurer of the Greater 
New Orleans AFL-CIO. He will seek to expand union sponsorship of Boy Scout troops 
and encourage greater participation by union members as scout leaders. At 
present, there are 500 union-sponsored Boy Scout troops in the United States, and 
approximately 25 percent of all scout leaders are members of AFL-CIO unions. 

A NEW MINE SAFETY LAW that would call for Federal inspection of metallic and 
nonmetallic mines has been proposed to Congress by Secretary of the Interior 
Stewart L. Udall. The legislation would affect some 200,000 workers not now 
covered. 

PUBLIC RECORDS — The AFL-CIO has called for changes in a bill to require Federal 
agencies to make records available to the public. In a statement submitted to the 
House Subcommittee on Foreign Operations and Government Information, AFL-CIO 
Legislative Director Andrew Biemiller said that the Federation supports "the 
principles and purposes of legislation to open up the processes of government to 
public view" because only a fully-informed public can govern itself wisely. 

A FURTHER CUT in income taxes paid by lowest-income families was urged by Douglas 
Dillon in his last speech before stepping out as Secretary of the Treasury, last 
month. The relief already given is inadequate, he told a symposium of Federal 
taxation in Washington. 



MAY, 1965 



TO THE MEMORY OF O. WILLIAM BLAIER 



Conference Room in Philadelphia Building 
Trades Headquarters Dedicated to Former Leader 




Mrs. William Blaier, widow of our late 
vice president, cuts the ribbon to open 
the memorial room, shown at right. 




In a full day of activities, April 3, 
the Philadelphia, Pa., Building Trades 
Council paid tribute to present and 
departed leaders — including the late 
Second General Vice President of the 
United Brotherhood, O. William 
Blaier. 

The special day began with the dedi- 
cation of the Council's new headquar- 
ters, The James L. McDevitt Building, 
recently erected at 2535 Orthodox 
Street. The spacious new building pays 
tribute to the Plasterer who served his 
apprenticeship in Philadelphia, became 
president of the city's building and 
construction trades council, later was 
state federation president, and finally 
took over the tremendous task of di- 
recting Labor's League for Political 
Education, which later became the 
AFL-CIO Committee on Political Edu- 
cation. 

More than a hundred labor and 
civic leaders — including several nation- 
al and international union officers — 
participated in the dedication cere- 
monies at 12:30 p.m. on a bright 
spring Saturday afternoon. The Rt. 
Rev. Monsignor Martin J. Lynch asked 
Divine guidance for the trade unionists 
who gather and work in the new build- 
ing. On the platform with him at the 
dedication ceremonies were the widow 
and son of James McDevitt: the gen- 



eral president of the Operative Plaster- 
ers and Cement Masons Int'l. Assn., 
Edward J. Leonard; Al Barkan. pres- 
ent national director of COPE; and 
several other officials. 

Barkin recalled the work of his 
predecessor and called upon the as- 
sembled trade unionists to carry on 
the political education work begun by 
McDevitt. 

Among the honored guests were 
Michael Johnson, executive secretary 
of the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO; the 
Hon. Paul D'Ortona, president of the 
Philadelphia City Council; Hunter P. 
Wharton, general president of the In- 
ternational Union of Operating Engi- 
neers: C. J. Haggerty, president of the 
AFL-CIO Building and Construction 
Trades Department; Harry Boyer, 
president of the Pennsylvania AFL- 
CIO; Edward Toohey, president of the 
Philadelphia AFL-CIO Council; Jacob 
David, secretary of the Philadelphia 
Council; and William Peitler, general 
president of the Marble, Slate and 
Stone Polishers. 

Heading the United Brotherhood 
group attending the ceremonies was 
General Treasurer Peter Terzick. 
Other leaders included Robert H. 
Gray, secretary-treasurer of the Metro- 
politan District Council of Carpenters, 
Philadelphia and Vicinity; and John 



Anello, Council business representa- 
tive. 

Following ceremonies outside the 
building, the doors were opened for a 
tour of the new facilities. At this time 
there was a brief ribbon-cutting cere- 
mony for the opening of the O. Wil- 
liam Blaier Conference Room. As 
Brother Terzick, Mrs. James McDevitt. 
and others stood by, the widow of our 
late international officer snipped the 
bright ribbon at the conference room 
door, and visitors got their first view 
of the beautiful wood-paneled room. 

To climax a busy day of activities in 
the City of Brotherly Love, a testi- 
monial dinner was held that evening 
for James J. O'Neill, president of the 
Philadelphia Building Trades Council. 
The program for that festive occasion 
had this to say about the Brotherhood 
officer to whom the conference room 
was dedicated during the afternoon: 

"The passing of O. William Blaier 
has left a large gap in the labor move- 
ment and in the memory of his many 
friends." 

Blaier died on January 4, 1962, at 
the age of 65. He served our organiza- 
tion for many years in local and inter- 
national posts, and the special room 
to his memory is a fitting tribute to this 
departed leader. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



RIGHT: Dedication ceremonies for the 
McDevift Building. BELOW: Mrs. James 
McDevitt unveils the plaque at the build- 
ing's entrance. With her are Paul D'Or- 
tona, president, Philadelphia City Coun- 
cil; and James O'Neill, president, Build- 
ing Trades Council. 
Tl 




Assembled in the William Blaier Room following ceremonies were, seated left to right: Frank Graver, Presi- 
dent, District Council; Ray Ginnetti, General Representative, United Brotherhood; International Treasurer Pete 
Terzick; Robert H. Gray, Secretary-Treasurer, District Council; John Anello, Business Representative, District 
Council (Anello designed and supervised work on the memorial room). Standing: Harry Boyer, President, 
Pennsylvania AFL-CIO; Charles Shedaker, LU 359; Charles Boyer, Representative, Carpenters District Council; 
Tom Martin, retired Business Agent, Philadelphia District Council; Harry Dooley, Assistant to Secretary, Dis- 
trict Council; Jack Gushue, Business Representative, Local 454; Harry Anderson, Business Representative, 454. 




LEFT: The new McDevitt Building. 
ABOVE: Robert Gray, Peter Terzick and 
John Anello present a memorial plaque 
to the widow of William Blaier. 



MAY, 1965 



11 



$69,400 FOR WEST COAST FLOOD VICTIMS 



Brotherhood Tallies $375,000 Aid to 
Red Cross Disaster Relief Since 1906 



On behalf of the Brotherhood, 
First General Vice President Finlay 
C. Allan, recently presented, in West 
to. ist ceremonies, a check for $69,- 
400 to aid victims of winter floods 
in the Coastal States. The cheek 
was presented to General James F. 
Collins, president of the American 
National Red Cross, for that organ- 
ization's disaster relief work. 

Present with Mr. Allan to present 
the check were Lyle Hiller, of Port- 
land, Oregon, Seventh District 
Board Member; and Patrick Hogan 
of Los Angeles, Eight District 
Board Member. 

Upon accepting the contribution, 
General Collins emphasized that "all 
Red Cross disaster relief assistance 
is given as an outright gift and no 
repayment is ever requested or ex- 
pected." 

He added that the contribution 
from the United Brotherhood would 
be used to help flood victims rebuild 
and repair homes and to provide 
clothing and household furnishings. 
He said that Red Cross expects to 
spend some $4 million in flood re- 
covery aid before the job is finished 
in the disaster-stricken areas of 
northern California, Washington, 
Oregon and Idaho. 

Mr. Allan pointed out that mem- 
bers of the United Brotherhood were 
victims of the floods themselves and 
had received Red Cross assistance. 
"Since the San Francisco earth- 




Gen. Collins presented Vice President 
Allan with a certificate of appreciation 
to the Brotherhood for its contribution 
for relief of flood disaster victims. 



12 




Finlay C. Allan (left), first general vice president of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America, recently presented a check for $69,400 
for flood disaster relief to Gen. James F. Collins, president of the American 
National Red Cross, at the organization's Western Area Headquarters in San 
Francisco. Looking on are Lyle J. Hiller, (second from left) Portland, Oregon, 
Seventh District Board Member; and Patrick Hogan, Los Angeles, Eighth 
District Board Member. The check was the largest single contribution made 
for relief of disaster victims in the recent West Coast floods. General Vice 
President Allan and General Collins were making official administrative visits 
to their respective San Francisco offices. 



quake of 1906," he said, "carpen- 
ters have contributed a total of 
$375,900 to disaster relief." 

Contributions by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America since 1906 are 
as follows: 

• 1906, April — California — San 
Francisco earthquake, $10,- 
000; 1927, May — Mississippi 
Valley Flood Relief — East 
Coast — Miami, Florida Dis- 
trict Council (cyclone) $7,500. 

• Year 1937, Ohio River Relief 
—Louisville flood, $20,000. 

• 1950, May— Flood relief- 
Winnipeg, Canada, $50,000; 
May, Fire relief — Quebec, 
Quebec, $20,000; May, Re- 
lief for membership — Marys- 
ville, Calif., flood, $20,000. 

• 1955, May, Flood relief — 
Northeast U. S. — Indianapolis 
chapter, American Red Cross, 
$50,000. 

• 1956, Jan., Flood disaster — 
West Coast, through National 



Red Cross, $50,000; March, 
Flood relief fund — Pennsyl- 
vania State Council $9,000; 
March, Matching contribu- 
tions made to flood relief — 
California State Council, $20,- 
000. 

• 1964, April — Earthquake and 
flood relief — Alaska, through 
American Red Cross, $50,- 
000. 

• 1965, March. Western flood 
fund — through American Red 
Cross, $64,900. 

Total contributions: $375,900. 



First Aid Training 

First aid is required training for 
many industrial workers. A large 
number get their instruction from 
Red Cross volunteers. This is the 
same instruction given to over 
1,000,000 Americans every year 
by Red Cross specialists in teach- 
ing emergency aid at home and on 
the highway. Ask your local Red 
Cross about first aid training in 
your vicinity. 



THE CARPENTER 





EDITORIALS 



* STAY OUT OF THE NEWSPAPER! 

This summer millions of Americans are going to 
clog the nation's highways. Whether on business or 
pleasure-bent on vacations, they will each pose a threat 
to the safety of the other. 

If you are going to be one of them, do yourself 
and your fellow travelers a favor: have your car thor- 
oughly checked out before you start. Replace danger- 
ously-thin tires. Have your brake linings and master 
cylinder checked. Inspect the steering linkage. Care- 
fully go over operation of direction signal lights, stop 
lights and tail lights. Have the positioning of your 
headlights checked for maximum night-time visibility 
with minimum blinding effect on oncoming motorists. 
If you don't have seat belts, install them. If you do 
have them, make certain you use them. 

This summer there are going to be newspaper stories 
about highway tragedies. Many will have grisly pic- 
tures of the hapless victims, dead and dying, strewn 
on the concrete. With proper care ahead of time and 
good driving practices, you can insure that you or your 
family will not be included. Start now! 

* THE OTHER SIDE OF THE COIN 

Every hourly worker knows that his "high hourly 
rates" don't mean high annual earnings ... in spite of 
what the newspapers sometimes insinuate. 

Latest earnings statistics from the U.S. Department 
of Labor confirm his view: A total of 184 occupation- 
al and professional classifications (out of 321) have 
higher annual earnings than the carpenter, bricklayer, 
cabinet maker, concrete finisher, and the other build- 
ing and construction trades. With non-union workers 
tilting the scales downward, the median or average 
earnings for the construction worker in 1959 was less 
than $4,900 a year! 

Lowest paid craftsmen in the Department of La- 
bor's tabulation were shoe repairers, with $2,800 a 
year. Highest paid — you guessed it — doctors — with an 
average of $14,561. 

Craftsmen who do a substantial amount of out-of- 
door and seasonal work are going to have a hard time 
keeping their annual take-home pay high. 

That's why it's so important that we fight even 
harder for higher hourly wages and benefits . . . and 
why — to achieve our wage goals — we must have public 
support. Every union craftsman has a public relations 



job to perform. He must show the quick-reading snap- 
judging public the other side of organized labor's 
hard-earned coin. 

* CHERRY TREES AND VIEWPOINTS 

The past month saw literally hundreds of thousands 
of people pour into Washington. D. C, to see the 
cherry blossoms in bloom. These trees were the gift 
of the Japanese government in 1912. After another 
Japanese government directed the air attack on Pearl 
Harbor in 1941, there were cries against the defense- 
less trees which had, at that time, taken firm roots in 
their adopted country for 29 years. Despite guards 
placed around them, at least one tree was chopped 
down by "patriots." 

A few years earlier, when F. D. Roosevelt an- 
nounced plans for the Jefferson Memorial and it was 
learned that several of the trees would be removed, 
zealous women marched in protest and several chained 
themselves to the threatened trunks. Characteristically, 
FDR placated both sides as he arranged to have the 
trees transplanted rather than merely chopped down. 

The only point to be made here is that cherry trees 
and many other pleasant factors we pass on our way 
through life are often enjoyed and even taken for 
granted until some foreign intrusion is thrust upon 
us. Then, in all likelihood, emotions take over where 
reason once held sway and grown people often begin 
to act like truant, spoiled children. 

It is nice to have a sense of balance, especially when 
things begin to get a little bumpy. Enjoy Life's "cherry 
trees," but don't try to blame them for others' mis- 
deeds or attribute to them false aspects of irreplac- 
ability. 

* TESTING, TESTING, TESTING 

Intelligence, aptitude and personality tests are being 
administered to many job seekers and job holders to- 
day. Some seem innocent enough . . . But then there's 
the case of the non-union trucking company which has 
a list of 500 questions it asks of potential drivers, in- 
cluding whether the prospective employee prefers a 
shower to a bath tub, if he is afraid of deep water, and 
if he thinks women should be allowed in bars. It would 
be interesting to know what the employer expects to 
learn about his truck drivers. Possibly some drivers 
like to take a shallow bath in a mixed bar. 



MAY, 1965 



13 




M 



MM&fi' 



i f ' : - »i 




-. 



The horse-drawn caisson at an Army military funeral in Arlington National Cemetery. The caparisoned, riderless horse follows. 

THE MOST HALLO WED 




This Memorial Day, the United States pays tribute to 
its war dead at Arlington National Cemetery. 
Two Presidents, scores of generals and admirals, 
thousands of officers and men are buried there. 



The man who devotes his life to the 
military service must be prepared to 
sacrifice that life in the defense of his 
country. Whether he be general or pri- 
vate, this obligation is foremost in his 
mind. 

In war, the general officer usually 
lives a more comfortable and satisfying 
military life, by virtue of his rank and 
responsibilities. The private, on the oth- 
er hand, lives from day to day carrying 
out orders and doing his job to the best 
of his ability. 

When called upon to make that su- 
preme sacrifice, the graveside ceremo- 
nies remind us of this necessary distinc- 
tion in rank. The enlisted man receives 
"standard honors." This consists of the 
traditional three-volley rifle salute and 
the playing of "Taps." Officers, on the 
other hand, receive "full honors," which 
varies again according to commissioned 
rank. This usually involves a horse- 
drawn caisson, a platoon of troops, a 
color guard, and the service band. In 
the case of a general officer, the platoon 
of troops can grow to four companies of 
men, and a cannon salute may be fired 
by batteries of artillery. 

Ironically, it is at the moment of inter- 
ment—the final act one man can do for 
another— that the general and the pri- 
vate, for the first time, line up side by 
side . . . equal at last. 



A RLINGTON National Cemeter> 
^^\ is the oldest and one of 
■q \ the largest of all our na- 
tional cemeteries . . . second only to 
Long Island National Cemetery at 
Farmingdale, N.Y. Its 420 acres are 
located on the gently-rolling Virginia 
hills overlooking the Nation's capital, 
across the Potomac River. Shaded by 
thousands of trees, white marble mar- 
kers fall away in all directions in un- 
broken lines. 

There are graves for Continental 
soldiers from Washington's Army of 
the Revolution; a grave for 14 soldiers 
and sailors who died in 1812; one grave 
for 2,111 Union dead from Bull Run 
and the roads to Rappahannock; a sec- 
tion set aside for the 229 men who 
died when the Maine exploded in Ha- 
vana harbor, and the graves of some 
whose names have been lost. 

The first recorded burial in Arling- 
ton occurred on May 13, 1854. when 
Private William Christman, Company 
G, 67th Pennsylvania Infantry, was 
interred beneath the shading branches 
of a cedar tree. Two days later, an 
unknown Confederate prisoner of war 
was buried nearby. Since then many 
great leaders of every American con- 
flict from the Civil War through the 
Korean Conflict, have joined Private 
Christman. 



They include: Major Pierre Charles 
L'Enfant, designer of the City of 
Washington: Robert Todd Lincoln, son 
of Abraham Lincoln; William Jen- 
nings Bryan, "The Silver Tongued 
Orator;" Admiral Robert E. Peary, 
first at the North Pole; William How- 
ard Taft, President and Chief Justice 
of the United States; General Philip 
Kearny, "Fighting Phil;" Admiral 
William T. Sampson, who planned the 
destruction of Spain's last Armada; 
General Leonard Wood of Teddy's 
"Rough Riders;" John J. (Black Jack) 
Pershing, General of the Armies; Gen- 
eral Jonathan Wainwright of the Ba- 
taan "Death March;" Admiral Wil- 
liam (Bull) Halsey, World War II 
naval commander; Admiral Richard E. 
Byrd, explorer of the frozen ends of 
the earth; General George C. Mar- 
shall, soldier and statesman; John 
Foster Dulles, post-World War II Sec- 
retary of State; and John F. Kennedy, 
35th President of the United States. 

Walking through this great national 
shrine, many questions run through 
one's mind — unique markers, mainte- 
nance of the cemetery, why some 
markers are standing upright while 
others are lying flat on the ground, 
and many others. Here are some in- 
teresting sidelights of which most visi- 
tors are not aware: 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



fa Burials average 28 per day, and 
have increased by 1000 per year. To- 
day, there are approximately 135,000 
persons interred in the cemetery. 

fa Available space in the present 
acreage is expected to be filled by the 
end of this year— 1965. Plans are 
underway to clear the buildings and 
utilize the adjacent South Post of Fort 
Myer. Virginia, for burials. This addi- 
tional acreage will last approximately 
10 years. 

fa Eligible for burial are members 
of the United States armed forces or - 
veterans with honorable discharges. 



3 RO U N D 



The wives, husbands, widows, widow- 
ers, minor children, and unmarried 
daughters of servicemen or service- 
women are also entitled to an Arling- 
ton burial. 

fa Among the honored dead lying 
in Arlington are the Unknown Soldier 
of World War I, and the Two Un- 
knowns of World War II and Korea. 

fa Between 85 and 100 graves are 
kept available for funerals at all time. 

fa The "mock burial" (a term used 
by the cemetery staff) is often used 
whereby those attending the funeral 
stand on the nearest road, where the 
ceremonies are executed. The military 
pallbearers then carry the casket to 
the grave itself. The "mock burial" 
is used when the ground is too wet or 
soft for the participants to walk on. 

fa Old regulation allowed "side by 
side" burials for a man and his wife 
or children. Because of a space short- 
age, the caskets are now 'stacked' — 
one on top of another. The grave is 
dug five feet for a single burial and 
seven feet for a multiple burial. 

fa There is no embalming at the 
cemetery. This has to to be done by a 
licensed mortician. 

fa For the servicemen buried at sea 
or lost in action, a Memorial marker 
is used. Whereas the usual grave is five 
feet wide and ten feet long, the Memo- 
rial grave is five feet by five feet. Some 
of the men who went down with the 
U.S.S. Thresher in 1963 are honored 
by this type of marker at Arlington. 

fa A serviceman released with an 
honorable discharge, who later is con- 
victed of a crime and serves more than 
five years in prison, cannot be buried 




A lone infantryman stands guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. 



in a national cemetery. 

fa The cemetery employs about 150 
people, 85 of whom work at main- 
taining the grounds. Two weeks out 
of every month are spent cutting the 
grass. 

fa Individual grave markers are set 
in the ground upright. A marker lay- 
ing flat on the ground designates a mass 
burial. For example, there are several 
markers honoring men killed in air- 
plane crashes or explosions. 

fa The Black Charger, a capari- 
soned, riderless horse carrying a pair 
of cavalry boots reversed in the stir- 
rups, may accompany the body of any 
General Officer as well as all commis- 



sioned officers who served in the 
cavalry. 

fa To date, approximately 8,300,- 
000 persons have visited the grave of 
President Kennedy. During the sum- 
mer, visitors average about 10,000 a 
weekday and 50,000 on Saturdays and 
Sundays. 

The slow cadence of horses pulling 
the caisson, the inspirational sound of 
"Taps", a volley of rifle shots, the 
distant boom of a cannon and the roll 
of the drums are ever-present through- 
out the hills of Arlington Cemetery. 
They are a constant reminder of the 
history of American sacrifice that has 
kept this nation free. 




These simple white headstones mark the graves of Private William Christ- 
man, the first man to be buried in Arlington, and General John Pershing. 



MAY, 1965 



15 






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MAY, 1965 



SMI 



BURIED ALIVE 

Continued from Page 8 

A bulldozer crew found Myllyla 
as the big blade systematically sliced 
inch after inch off the snow wall, 
at the edge of the landing pad on 
what was to be the last pass so as 
not to disturb the landing area. That 
last few inches spelled the difference 
between life and death for Einar 
Myllyla. 

Everything that medical science 
can do has been done for Myllyla, 
sufferer of what the medics call cold 
injury. The oxygen machine, which 
weighed 1,600 pounds, was flown 
from Buffalo by the Royal Canadian 
Air Force, together with an operator. 

Cold injury experts were flown in 
from Anchorage. 

Myllyla's right hand and left foot 
were most seriously damaged. The 
fingers and toes looked as if they 
had been dipped into black ink. 
The fingertips of the right hand were 
removed. Only the thumb remains 
intact. 

But Dr. James Wilson, and his 
brother, Arthur Wilson, who have 
been taking care of Einar from the 
start, say he will again be able to 
grasp carpenter tools. The big prob- 
lem now is the left foot. Only time 
will tell about that and the decisions 
will be made at Vancouver General 
Hospital. 

Along with the cold injury, the 
body chemistry of Myllyla got out 
of kilter. But this has largely been 
corrected by Dr. Arthur Wilson, 
the internist in the brother medical 
team. 

During his six weeks in Ketchikan 
General Hospital, Myllyla was at- 
tended the clock around by special 
nurses. Whirl-pool therapy was a 
part of each day's routine. This was 
to help return circulation to the 
injured members. 

The Granduc Corporation is pay- 
ing all the bills and will continue to 
do so until Myllyla is able to return 
to work. 

Among the hundreds of letters re- 
ceived by Myllyla were some which 
recommended "sure-fire" cures for 
frost bite. One from a woman in 
Chicago explained that "you boil 
the flax, or carpenter's glue" and 
apply it by poultice to the frozen 
limb. "This draws out the frost," 



she wrote, explaining that it was a 
successful remedy handed down by 
her grandmother in Austria. 

The Drs. Wilson give Myllyla 
himself much of the credit for his 
strides back to near full recovery. 
While Myllyla is a man of few 
words, says Dr. Jim, he is a man 
of great determination. This, with 
the medical help, gets the full credit 
for Einar's progress. 

Einar's room in the new Ketch- 
ikan hospital operated for the city 
by the Sisters of St. Joseph of New- 
ark, overlooked beautiful Tongass 
Narrows. From his bed he could 
look out across the waters and see 
the passing fishing boats and the 
new autoliners of the Alaska Mar- 
ine Highway System as they glided 
across the quiet waters on their 630- 
mile runs between Prince Rupert, 
B. C, and Skagway, Alaska. 

If Einar got tired of that he would 
board his "walker" and go visiting 
down the corridors. 

Just before leaving Ketchikan, 
Einar said to me: 

"How about it this summer if 
I come back and have a go at sal- 
mon fishing with you?" 

"That's for sure," I replied. 

Einar answered with his infec- 
tious smile. 

Then he said: 

"Did you say that the carpenters 
here just got a raise to $5.85?" 

"That's for sure," I said. 

"I'll see you this summer, Greg." 




-i^ms. 



EDITOR'S NOTE: Keep your Interna- 
tional Union magazine posted on hap- 
penings in your own union. Remind your 
officers to keep us informed. 



17 



New Jurisdictional Disputes Plan Moves Ahead 



LABOR MEMBERS NAMED TO JURISDICTION BOARDS 



["he \ II. CIO Building and Construc- 
tion Trades Department has moved 
iihead quickly to implement the new 
jurisdictional disputes plan lor the con- 
struction industry. 

rwo weeks after the plan was signed 
in February ceremonies at the White 
House, the H & CT Council named eight 
experienced union leaders to the Na- 
tional Joint Board for the Settlement of 
lurisdictional Disputes and the newly- 
created appeals board, which will render 
final decisions. 

Still under study is the selection of an 



impartial umpire to head the appeals 
board. The contractors who negotiated 
the disputes plan with the department 
will name their members of the board 
and the appeals body separately. 

The council decided that members of 
the board and the appeals body would 
be rotated annually by election of the 
council. It made clear also the need for 
speeding the processing of appeals be- 
cause of the nature of construction work. 
so that a case can be decided while it 
is still pertinent. It indicated that the 
appeals board would be empowered to 
reject frivolous or meaningless appeals 



to ensure prompt action on pertinent 
cases. 

The National Joint Board was set up 
as a voluntary group by construction la- 
bor and management 1 5 years ago. The 
agreement signed earlier this year is a 
major reorganization of procedures, in- 
cluding the establishment of the appeals 
board and an impartial umpire, consid- 
eration of consumer interests in the reso- 
lution of jurisdictional disputes, defini- 
tion of standards used by the Joint Board 
in reaching decisions and consultation 
with management groups affected by dis- 
putes between unions. 



NAMED TO JOINT BOARD 



NAMED TO APPEALS BOARD 




JOHN J. McCARTlN is the Assistant Gen- 
eral President of the United Association 
of Journeymen and Apprentices of the 
Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry of 
the United States and Canada. He is 
a native of Chicago. Illinois, and for- 
mer general organizer. 



S. FRANK RAFTERY is the President of 
the Brotherhood of Painters. Decorators 
and Paperhangers of America. Born 
in St. Louis. Mo., he is a former gen- 
eral representative. Mr. Raftery was a 
representative of the first Joint Board 
for Jurisdictional Disputes for 12 years. 





frank hanley is the Assistant to the 
President of the Operating Engineers 
International Union, specializing in 
jurisdictional disputes. He is a gradu- 
ate of Notre Dame University in South 
Bend. Indiana. 



WILLIAM SlDELL, Second General Vice 
President of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America, 
has been a member of his union for 
more than 25 years. A leader of the 
Brotherhood in California for many 
years, he was elected a General Execu- 
tive Board Member from the 8th Dis- 
trict at the 1962 Convention. " 





JOSEPH T. POWER is Executive Vice 
President and Executive Board Mem- 
ber of the Operative Plasterers and 
Cement Masons International Associa- 
tion of the United States and Canada. 
He is a native of Chicago, who served 
his apprenticeship as a plasterer in that 
city. 



HOMER E. patton is Secretary-Treas- 
urer of the International Brotherhood 
of Boilermakers. Iron Ship Builders, 
Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers. He 
worked as a boilermaker on the West 
Coast for some years before being 
appointed an international representa- 
tive in 1941. He became secretary- 
treasurer in 1958. 





MAURICE FANCHER is the Eighth Vice 
President of the International Hod Car- 
riers', Building and Common Laborers' 
Union of America. He is Regional 
Manager of the Union's Charleston, 
West Virginia, Regional Office. 



JOHN McCarthy is the Vice President 
of the International Association of 
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers. 
Born in St. Louis, Illinois, he has been 
an Iron Worker for 35 years and was 
a general organizer in the Illinois ter- 
ritory. 




18 



THE CARPENTER 



HOME STUDY COURSE-UNIT 1 



Basic Mathematics 




This series of mathematical units, beginning 
in this issue of the "Carpenter" and continuing 
in following issues, is intended as a review of 
the basic functions and elements of mathematics 
which we need in our everyday work. 

It is not intended that this series of units ' 
will serve as a complete course in the funda- 
mentals of mathematics. However, it is hoped 
that an interest will be stimulated in each 
reader to improve his skills in those areas in 
which a weakness may be discovered as a re- 



sult of the problems presented in each unit. 

A minimum of definitions and specific in- 
structions in the various operations needed to 
solve the problems will be included for each of 
the major topics included in these units. Sample 
'problems with answers will be given as illustra- 
tions for the topics. Additional problems will 
be presented for you to solve to assure that you 
have a mastery of the topic being discussed. 
Periodically, a test of the material will be pre- 
sented to determine how well you actually 



know the correct process to use and that you 
are using your skills with accuracy. 

The following topics will be presented: 

1. Whole numbers — addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, and division. 

2. Decimals and percentages. 

3. Fractions — common and mixed. 

4. Me nsu ratio n— li near, angular, area, and 
solids. 



addition of whole numbers — Addition is the process of 
finding the sum of a series of numbers. The initial step 
in setting up a problem in addition is to place the numbers 
to be added in such a manner that the last digit of each 
number is directly under the last digit of the previous 
number. By doing this, it is possible to add each of the 
columns of numbers accurately. 

EXAMPLE: Add the following numbers: 24, 36. and 148. 
Start with the right hand column and add 
the number in that column. 4 + 6 + 8 = 

2 4 18. Place the 8 under the line and carry the 

3 6 ( 1 ) over to the next column and proceed to 

1 4 8 add the second column. 2 + 3+4—10. 
(1) (1) Place the under that column and carry 
the (1) to the next column and the third 

2 8 column. 1 + (1) .= 2. Place the 2 under 

the third column. The answer which is 
called the "sum" is 208. 

Solve the following problems: 



1. 


29 


2. 88 3. 


458 


4. 


456 




36 


13 


96 




987 




71 


64 


481 




630 


5. 


1368 


6. 596 


7. 


39 






7362 


17 




435 






1275 


9 
676 




7908 
71 














125 




8007 




8. 


4499 


9. 2376 


10. 


58762 






996 


909 




462 






9361 


87 




7301 






37 


214 




83 






440 


8459 




49908 





11. 2 + 18 + 126 + 497 = 

12. 225 + 553 + + 6307 = 



subtraction of whole NUMBERS-Subtraction is the proc- 
finding the difference between two given numbers. The 
initial step in setting up a problem in subtraction is to 
place the smaller number (the subtrahend) under the 
larger number (the minuend) in such a manner that the 
last digit of the smaller number is directly under the last 
digit of the larger number. 

EXAMPLE: Find the difference between 248 and 635. 

Start with the right hand column. Since 8 

is larger than 5, it is necessary to borrow 

6 3 5 from the next column to make the 5 greater 

2 4 8 than 8. We can now subtract 8 from 15 

which is 7. Place the 7 under the line in 

the first column. Proceed to the second 

2 15 column. We now see that we must subtract 

6 3 5 4 from 2 so again we must borrow from the 

2 4 8 next column. 4 from 12 leaves 8 which is 

placed in the second column under the line. 

7 Continue to the next column and subtract 
2 from 5 which is 3 and place the 3 under 

15 the line in the third column. The answer to 

5 the problem 635 — 248 = 387. Subtrac- 

8 tion problems can be checked for accuracy 
by adding the answer to the subtrahend. 

3 8 7 This sum must equal the minuend. Note: 

387 + 248 = 635. 

Solve the following problems: 



5 12 

6 3 

2 4 



1. 


98 
—62 


2. 
5. 
8. 


231 
—175 


3. 


864 
—465 


4. 


6243 
—4539 


57362 
— 9756 


6. 503 
— 96 


7. 


987 
—789 


2398 
— 489 


9. 7102 
—4666 


10. 


68452 
—50737 







ANSWERS TO PROBLEMS ABOVE ON PAGE 25 



MAY, 1965 



19 



Long -Time Lakeland Superintendent 
Retires; Plymate Named Successor 



Reprinted from the Lakeland, Fla., Ledger 





ABOVE: Joseph A. Plymate, left, newly- 
appointed superintendent of the Car- 
penters Home, shakes hand with 
Marshall Goddard, who is retiring after 
25 years of service. With them is 
Mrs. Goddard, the home's organist and 
librarian. 

LEFT: A view of the Brotherhood's 
Home for Aged Members at Lakeland, 
Florida, where Marshall Goddard started 
work in 1929. 



Marshall Goddard. who has been 
the superintendent of the Carpenters 
Home at Lakeland. Florida for about 
35 years has announced his retire- 
ment. 

Replacing Goddard is Joseph A. 
Plymate of Washington, D. C.. who 
has served as the secretary to the 
general president of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join- 
ers of America for the same period 
of time Goddard served at Lake- 
land as superintendent. 

Goddard was employed by the 
old Thelma Hotel on the corner of 
East Lemon Street and North Ken- 
tucky Avenue in Lakeland before 
he became the kitchen and dining 
room supervisor for the Carpenters 
Home in 1929. 

Carpenters Home was started in 
1928 and the first meal was served 
there in 1929 to 19 retired men. 

"Since then it has grown quite 
a bit," Goddard noted. 

"Managing the Home has been 
more than a job to me. It has been 
a way of life I will miss." 

From his first job as kitchen and 
dining room manager, Goddard was 
promoted in 1939 to superintendent. 

Since it opened, Carpenter Home 
has seen 1,785 men pass through 
its halls, and Goddard knew just 
about every one of them. He had to. 
As superintendent, Goddard said, 



"My first obligation was to the men. 

"Of course, you have to be just 
a little bit of everything to them, 
but you must constantly remember 
that their lives are in your hands." 

And Goddard's wife has also been 
active at the home. She is the organ- 
ist and the librarian and is also re- 
tiring along with her husband, al- 
though she will stay at the home 
for a few more weeks. 

The Goddards live at 710 S. Mis- 
sissippi Ave., but hope to spend 
much time at Anna Maria Island 
nearby, just "fishing and swimming." 
Goddard hopes to spend much of his 



retirement playing golf. 

The employes have helped him to 
enjoy those leisure hours. They gave 
him a television set, golf cart and 
some balls as a going-away-present. 

"You know," he said sadly as he 
took his last walk through the long 
hallway, "I'm sad to leave this 
place. After 35 years you sort of get 
used to your surroundings." 

And from the looks of the retired 
men sitting in their rocking chairs 
as they watched Goddard and his 
wife stand for the last time on the 
home's front steps, they'll miss them 
too. 



Recent Contri 

Local No. 

7, Minneapolis, 

Minn 

10. Chicago. Ill 

13. Chicago. Ill 
44, Urbana, 111. . . . 
105, Cleveland. Ohio 
176, Newport, R. I. . 
180, Vallejo, Calif. . 
287, Harrisburg, Pa. 
514, Wilkes-Barre, Pa 
642, Richmond, Calif 
801, Woonsocket, R. I 
900, Altoona, Pa. . . 
1035. Taunton. Mass. 
1135. Port Jefferson, 
N. Y 


jutions to 

$ 14.50 
48.43 
87.50 
250.00 
50.00 
10.00 
45.76 
25.00 
50.00 
60.00 
10.00 
3.30 
67.25 

3.20 


Kennedy-Roosevelt Fund 

Local No. 

1319. Albuquerque, 

N. M $ 

1644, Minneapolis, 

Minn 


46.05 

138.90 

2.00 

20.00 

10.00 


2189. Madera, Calif. .. 
2264. Pittsburgh, Pa. . 
Ladies' Auxiliary No. 
467, Landover Knolls, 


March and April 

contributions $ 941.89 

Previous contributions 126,310.52 


Grand Total $127 


,252.41 



20 



THE CARPENTER 




Special Nationwide Telecast May 24 Will Test Your Driving Skills 



LAST year 47,000 Americans, men 
women and children lost their 
lives in auto accidents. Many of these 
were members of trade unions; some 
of them, unfortunately, belonged to 
our own union. In addition to the 
tragic deaths, millions of dollars in 
wages, medical costs, and property 
damage, were sustained. 

Traffic fatalities this year are again 
approaching new records if the pres- 
ent pace is maintained. And no relief 
is in sight with the most hazardous 
driving period of the year, the sum- 
mer months, fast approaching. More 
Americans, according to the National 
Safety Council, will drive to their 
deaths this summer than in any three- 
month period in the entire history of 
the organized safety movement, unless 
something extra is done. 

On the night of Monday, May 24 
beginning at 10:00 p.m. (EDT) some- 
thing extra will be done when the 
CBS television network goes on the 
air with a coast-to-coast telecast en- 
titled "The National Drivers' Test." 
The show, significantly enough, will 
be shown four days prior to Memorial 
Day, traditional weekend of national 
highway carnage. 

The purpose of the CBS telecast 
is not to make good drivers out of 
bad drivers but to call attention to 
the need for already-licensed drivers 
to improve their skills in order to be 
able to survive on the road. 

Although the show is not billed 



strictly as entertainment it is an inter- 
esting and exciting presentation and 
gives the viewer an opportunity to 
test his driving skills and knowledge. 
Specially prepared film sequences will 
illustrate each question and will be 
shown both in slow-motion and at nor- 



mal speed to permit the viewer to 
share the experience of a collision or 
near collision. All the viewer has to 
do is watch his TV screen as intently 
as he would watch the highway if he 
were driving and then record his re- 
Continued on Page 31 



THE NATIONAL DRIVERS TEST 



OFFICIAL TEST FORM 


A. JUDGMENT 


B. KNOWLEDGE 






Defensive 


Rules of the Road: 






Driving 
Techniques 


circle T [true! 
or F [false] 






circle correct 
letter 


SCORC SCORE 

l.T. F. ..D 6.T.F. ..□ 


ll.T.F. 


SCORE 

..G 


SCORE 


2. T. F. . .□ 7.T. F. ..□ 


12. T. F. 


..G 


l.a.b.c.d.. . .□ 


3.T. F. . .C 8.T. F. . .□ 


13. T. F. 


..G 


2. a. b.c. d.. . .□ 


4. T. F. . .G 9- T. F. ..Q 


14. T. F. 


..G 


3. a. b.c. d.. . .□ 


5. T. F. . .D 10. T. F. . .D 


15. T. F. 


..G 


C. PERCEPTION 
Hazards Alertness 


D. SPECIAL 

circle correct 




TOTAL 
SCORE 




1. List the number of driving 
hazards you have seen 


letter 








SCORE 

l.a.b.c.d G 

2. a.t.c.d G 










NUMBER ( ) SCO 


RE|_J 







MAY, 1965 



21 




Z- 



D 



&JLE5TH 




Buttering Her Up 

The milk man pulled a note from 
the bottle on the back porch. "Please 
leave 54 quarts," it read. 

"Fifty-four quarts?" he thought. 
"That must be a mistake." So he 
knocked. 

The woman came to the door: 
"That's right. My doctor has told 
me to take a milk bath and I figure 
I need 54 quarts." 

"Pasteurized?" he asked. 

"No," she replied, "just up to my 
chin." 

UNIONISM STARTS WITH YOU 




A Sick Sikh Joke! 

A carpenter from Punjab, a natu- 
ralized citizen, was absent from his 
job because of a Hindu holiday. 
When the company docked him, he 
appealed to the shop steward. "I 
don't think you've got a case," said 
the steward. "That religious holiday 
isn't in our contract!" 

"No, no!" replied the member. "It 
should count as Sikh leave!" 

PATRONIZE UNION-MADE GOODS 

No Surprise to Her 

The husband surprised his wife with 
another man in a dimly-lighted cock- 
tail lounge. "Well!" he shouted. 
"What does this mean?" 

"See!" exclaimed the wife to her 
table companion. "I told you he was 
stupid!" 



Ambition 

I'm hanging pictures night and day 

And planing down the doors. 

I don't mind getting low, low pay; 

For fun, I sand the floors! 

I fixed the window cord just now, 

I used my pocket knife. 

To be a joiner is my vow 

But I'm only a carpenter's wife! 

— Mrs. John J. Sullivan, 
Boston, Mass. 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

New Slat on Things 

The cutie had just finished her 
shower when her doorbell rang. "Who 
is it?" she asked through the door. 
"The blind man," came the reply. She 
opened the door and reached back 
for her nearby purse to give him a 
contribution. As she turned around, 
she saw a man standing there, a pack- 
age in his arms, grinning from ear to 
ear. 

"You can see!" she cried. 

"Yep," he answered. "Now, lady, 
what shall I do with these Venetian 
blinds?" 

BE SURE IT'S UNION 

A Heated Rejoinder 

The salesman breezed into the of- 
fice one sultry afternoon. "Hi, Willie," 
he greeted the office boy. "Haven't 
seen you in a long time. How's your 
boss standing the heat?" 

"Haven't heard," came Willie's 
terse reply. "He's only been dead a 
week." 



This Month's Limerick 

A young carpenter whose name was 

Tim 
Had a future that looked exceedingly 
dim. 
But the son-of-a-gun 
Up and joined a union 
And now things are rosey for him! 

— Richard Townsend, Jr., 
San Antonio, Tex. 



No Complaints 

The hotel detective heard strange 
noises in the room of the good-look- 
ing girl. He knocked on the door and 
challenged: "Are you entertaining in 
there?" Came the reply: "Well, I 
haven't heard any complaints!" 

BUY ONLY UNION TOOLS 

He Was Busy! 

The guy next to me at the union 
meeting was telling about a bald- 
headed barber trying to sell expensive 
hair restorer. 

"How can you expect to sell any," 
he asked the barber, "when you have 
no hair yourself?" 

"Why not?" said the barber. "I 
know a guy who's made a fortune 
selling brassieres!" 

YOU ARE THE "U" IN UNION 




Floundering Around? 

A tourist in Italy, visiting the water- 
front, saw what he thought was a Ger- 
man submarine moored at a pier. He 
said to an Italian fishing from the 
pier: "Is that a U-boat out there?" 

To which the fisherman replied: 
"No, thatsa notta my boat. I no 
gotta boat. I just fish offa da pier!" 

UNITED WE STAND 

And Liquid Assets? 

A finance company executive is like 
a solitary swimmer because he's al- 
ways floating a loan. 
— J. C. Grant, St. Catharines, Ont. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



Rent-A-Man Hiring 
A Threat to Unions 

PORTLAND. Ore. (PAD— Is a 
"temp" casting a shadow over your 
job security? 

"Temps" are temporary workers — 
the people sent out on jobs to the 
"rent-a-man" employment contractors. 

Gene Klare of the Oregon Labor 
Press recently investigated the use of 
"temps" in the Portland area and came 
up with some information which ap- 
plies all over the country. 

These employment contractors rent 
people for temporary employment. 
They charge the employer from about 
$1.75 an hour on up — and pay the 
worker $1.10 an hour and up. 

The people-renters pocket the rest 
to cover their expenses and provide 
them with a tidy profit. 

Employers like the system because 
it saves them money and bookkeeping 
bother. An employer saves money be- 
cause the temporary worker is paid 
less than the union scale and gets no 
fringe benefits. 

The employment contractor puts the 
temp on his own payroll, takes care 
of all tax and Social Security book- 
keeping and assumes all employer 
functions involving unemployment in- 
surance and workmen's compensation. 

Herbert Galton, an attorney for a 
number of unions, sees a serious threat 
arising from employment contractors 
as technological change increases, with 
many job skills giving way to auto- 
mated processes and in some cases, 
mere button-pushing. 

Unions face a problem in policing 
the situation, when a temp is hired by 
a union-shop employer, because union 
members on the job sometimes don't 
report the temporary worker's pres- 
ence. 

One international union publication 
recently sized up the rent-a-man prac- 
tice in this way: 

"The attraction of the temporary 
worker lies in the savings the employer 
realizes in the area of fringe bene- 
fits . . . the very things for which the 
labor movement has struggled the 
hardest and over which the longest 
battles have been waged." 

The union had this advice: 

"While the employer insists that the 
temporary worker is in the employ of 
the labor broker and not the company, 
the union's position is that certifica- 
tion automatically includes all people 
working inside the plant in job func- 
tions covered by the contract." 




These 

FREE BLUE PRINTS 

have started thousands toward 

BETTER PAY AND PROMOTION 



That's right! In all fifty states, men who 
sent for these free blue prints are today 
enjoying big success as foremen, superin- 
tendents and building contractors. They've 
landed these higher-paying jobs because they 
learned to read blue prints and mastered 
the practical details of construction. Now 
CTC home-study training in building offers 
you the same money-making opportunity. 

LEARN IN YOUR SPARE TIME 

As you know, the ability to read blue prints 
completely and accurately determines to a 
great extent how far you can go in building. 
What's more, you can learn plan reading 
simply and easily with the Chicago Tech 
system of spare-time training in your own 
home. You also learn all phases of building, 
prepare yourself to run the job from start 
to finish. 



CASH IN ON YOUR EXPERIENCE 

For over 61 years, building tradesmen and 
beginners alike have won higher pay with 
the knowledge gained from Chicago Tech's 
program in blue print reading, estimating, 
foremanship and contracting. Through step- 
by-step instruction, using actual blue prints 
and real specifications of modern, up-to-date 
buildings, you get a practical working 
knowledge of every building detail — a 
thorough understanding of every craft. And 
as a carpenter or apprentice, you already 
have valuable experience that may let you 
move up to foreman even before you com- 
plete your training. 

Don't waste a single day. Start preparing 
right now to take over a better job, increase 
your paycheck and command greater respect 
as the "boss" on the job. Find out about 
Chicago Tech's get-ahead training in build- 
ing. Send for your free blue prints and trial 
lesson — today! 



CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

TECH BLDG., 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



FREE 

BLUE PRINTS 

AND 
TRIAL LESSON 

Send for your free trial lesson 
now. You'll agree that this 
training is simple yet practical — ■ 
your surest way to promotion 
and increased income in build- 
ing. 

MAIL COUPON TODAY 



Chicago Technical College 

E-137 Tech Building, 2000 So. Michigan Ave. 

Chicago 16, Illinois 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet: "How to Read 
Blue Prints" with information about how I can train 
at home. 



Name. 



_Age_ 



Address- 
City 



-Zone 



-State- 



Occupation. 



MAY, 1965 



23 



Cm/idim QerfiMt 



Ontario Council Calls Upon Provincial 
Government to Outlaw Strikebreakers 



The Ontario Provincial Council of 
the Brotherhood presented a brief to 
Premier John Robarts on March 17 
which was probably one of the best 
presentations made by any union to 
the government in recent years. The 
brief was presented by Council Presi- 
dent A. J. Campbell and Secretary- 
Treasurer George F. McCurdy. The 
Ontario Council represents 94 local 
unions and district councils in the 
province. 

The 57-page brief of almost 10.000 
words was supplemented by 10 ex- 
hibits providing documentary evidence 
on a variety of subjects. 

While most of the brief dealt with 
matters affecting the Carpenters' jur- 
isdiction in particular, some of them, 
like medicare, were of general import 
to the public as well as the trade union 
movement. The Council urged the 
government to shelve its proposals for 
a limited medical insurance program 
in favour of a bigger plan based on 
"the superior features of the national 
medicare plan as recommended by the 
Hall Commission." 

The Hall Commission submitted a 
report to the federal government vir- 
tually endorsing labor's program for 
a comprehensive health insurance plan 
covering all services and all the peo- 
ple. The Ontario plan as put forward 
by Premier Robarts is for limited gov- 
ernment aid only for the lowest in- 
come groups for medical care alone, 
with the rest of the population to be 
covered under a voluntary plan, all by 
private insurance companies. 

The Council's policy is in line with 
that of the Canadian Labor Congress 
and the Ontario Federation of Labor. 

The brief protested the use of pro- 
fessional strikebreakers. Strikebreak- 



24 



ers should be barred, it demanded, and 
employers should be required to rehire 
striking employes once the strike is 
settled. The government's attention 
was drawn to the strikebreakers used 
in the current Typo strike at the three 
Toronto newspapers as well as to the 
use of farm-settlers as strikebreakers 
in the Northern Ontario dispute which 
led to the clash at Reesor Siding in 
which three Lumber and Sawmill 
Workers were killed. 

"If there were no lessons learned at 
Reesor Siding — if the Ontario govern- 
ment is to be oblivious to situations 
like the newspaper strike in Toronto — 
then this attitude represents an open 
invitation for a return to the law of 
the jungle." 

Amendments to the Criminal Code 
and to the Judicature Act were pro- 
posed, to permit pickets to persuade 
others to support their actions by 
peaceful means, and to eliminate the 
abuses of ex parte injunctions. The 
Council expressed its opposition to Bill 
41 which institutes a system of com- 
pulsory arbitration in hospital disputes 
when conciliation fails. 

Among the other proposals in the 
Ontario brief were: 

• broadening of the Human Rights 
Code to include a bar on discrimina- 
tion against older workers, 

• guarantee of access rights for un- 
ion organizers to remote logging and 
lumber camps, 

• extension of the powers granted 
to the Ontario Jurisdiction Disputes 
Commission. Present language in the 
labor act weakens the commission's 
ability to resolve disputes, the brief 
contended, 

• increase in the minimum wage 
for workers to $1.50 an hour and for 
tradesmen to $2 an hour, 



• broadening of the fair wage 
standard in government contracts to 
cover all structures in connection with 
highway construction, 

• trade certification for carpenters, 
millwrights and other skilled groups 
to end substitution of half-trained, 
cheap labor for trained mechanics, 

• requirements for employers to 
participate in on-the-job training pro- 
grams and licensing of all contractors, 
and 

• more stringent action by the De- 
partment of Labor to enforce munici- 
pal inspection under the Construction 
Safety Act or transfer of the responsi- 
bility to the department itself. 

Ontario Construction 
Higher Than in 47 States 

Canadians are beginning to brag a 
little about their rate of construction. 
Latest cause for cheering were 1964 
construction figures which show that 
per capita spending in construction in 
Ontario is higher than in 47 out of 50 
American states. The exceptions are 
California, Illinois and Texas. 

Ontario's capital helped set the rec- 
ord. Toronto's per capita construction 
last year was the highest of any city 
on the continent except Los Angeles. 
Moreover the city's rapid rate of build- 
ing is continuing this year. 

Building expenditures in Metropoli- 
tan Toronto in 1964 were at the rate of 
$336 for every man, woman and child. 
The corresponding Texas figure was 
$243, Ontario's $215. 

Another Ontario city with a major 
building boom is Windsor. In the last 
decade, this motor city, opposite De- 
troit, experienced considerable slack- 
ening in business. The auto boom has 
brought back the boom in Windsor, to 
such an extent that manufacturing 
plants increasing here at a faster rate 
than anywhere else in the country. 

The figures again tell the story. 

THE CARPENTER 



Construction in Windsor in 1 964 
doubled over 1963, and will be up 
again 30 per cent this year. This 
tripling of building in three years is 
the best in Canada. Of course the 
earlier slack years make the present 
growth rate look particularly good. 

If the new auto trade agreement 
between Canada and the U. S. works 
out as expected. Windsor should con- 
tinue to enjoy good growth for some 
years ahead. 

Federal Spending 
Bolsters the Economy 

Government spending on capital in- 
vestment will continue to have a bene- 
ficial effect on the Canadian economy. 
Estimates for 1965 total $4.7 billion. 
This is a three-quarters of a billion in- 
crease over last year. 

Of the total amount, the federal 
government is expected to spend about 
one billion dollars, the provincial gov- 
ernments about $2.3 billion and the 
municipal governments about $1.4 
billion. 

This capital investment will go into 
roads, schools, universities, housing and 
so on. 

Henry Rhodes Named 
To Organizing Post 

Ottawa, Ont. — Pres. Claude Jodoin 
of the Canadian Labour Congress has 
announced the appointment of Henry 
Rhodes as the CLC's acting director 
of organization. 

Rhodes, 52, has been assistant di- 
rector of the department and fills the 
vacancy caused by the appointment of 
Joseph MacKenzie, who has taken a 
leave of absence, to the Board of Mari- 
time Trustees. 



HOME STUDY COURSE 

Answers to Problems on Page 19 

Addition: (1) 136; (2) 165; (3) 
1035; (4) 2073; (5) 10005; (6) 
1423; (7) 16460; (8) 15333; (9) 
12045; (10) 116516; (11) 643; 
(12) 7085. 

Subtraction: (1) 35; (2) 56; (3) 
399; (4) 1704; (5) 47606; (6) 
407; (7) 198; (8) 1909; (9) 2436; 
(10) 17715. 

EDITOR'S NOTE: Please do not send 
answers to Home Study Course prob- 
lems to the International Office in Wash- 
ington. These problems are for training 
and practice and are not "for the 
record." 




Sheffield Scotch Nails 
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For example, Scotch Nails are square 
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Nails are economical, too. You get up 
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purchase. All these advantages enable 
you to do a superior job at less cost. 

Our complete line includes many 




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COMPANY 



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ARMCO STEEL 



ARMCO 

V 



MAY, 1965 



25 




/ 
/ 



LOCAL UNION NEWS 





TOP: At the head table, from left: Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Atkinson, Mary Walker, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Hanssen, Robert Carlyon, Mr. and Mrs. 
Geo. Meyers, Mr. and Mrs. D. U. McKell, Marie 
Shelley, Mr. and Mrs. Chris Enevold, Mr. and 
Mrs. John Welsh, Senator and Mrs. Eugene Mc- 
Ateer and, continuing, CENTER: Finlay Allan, 
Phil Doughterty, Jack Dougherty, Theodore Laur- 
idsen, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Lind, Mr. and Mrs. Eu- 
gene O'Connor, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Paczoch, Mrs. 
M. A. Andrade, Henry Sanders and Mr. and Mrs. 
Rollo Brown. INSERT ABOVE: Frank R. Sem- 
eit, awarded 50-year pin, and son, Henry, awarded 
25-year pin. LEFT: A view of the celebration. 



Local 22, One of the Brotherhood's Oldest Local Unions, Honors Old Timers 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.— On 
March 27, 500 members of Local 22 and 
their wives, attended a dinner at the Jack 
Tar Hotel, San Francisco, followed by 
presentation of pins and entertainment. 

First General Vice President Finlay 
Allan, brought greetings from General 
President Maurice Hutcheson and called 
attention to the fact that Local 22, the 
oldest local union in the United Brother- 
hood, was chartered Feb. 15, 1882, and 
he compared working conditions of the 
Carpenters 83 years ago with those of 
today. 

"Organized labor, and it members, have 
had far more than their share of lean 
years," Brother Allan commented. "Those 



of you who have been union carpenters 
for a long time need no reminder of 
that fact. 

"Nor do I think that any of us should 
need to be reminded that neither the 
United Brotherhood nor Local 22 would 
be here to enjoy these years of compara- 
tive prosperity without the steadfast loyal- 
ity of the many members who have stuck 
with their union through the years when 
the rewards of union membership were 
not so apparent as they are today. 

Vice President Allan presented pins to 
two members with 65 years membership, 
two with 60 years, eight members with 
55 years, nine members with 50 years, 
eight members with 45 years, 18 with 40 



years, 14 with 35 years, 103 with 30 
years and 400 with 25 years membership. 

Frank Semeit received a 50-year pin, 
and his son, Henry Semeit. a 25-year pin. 

Joseph O'Sullivan. financial secretary 
and business representative of Local 22, 
acted as toastmaster and introduced Guest 
Speaker and State Senator Eugene Mc- 
Ateer, who congratulated the honored 
members and complimented the Officers 
and members of Local 22. He said, "They 
are an asset to the trade movement of 
San Francisco and the State of Cali- 
fornia." He concluded by reminding, 
"What is good for labor is good for the 
Community." 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



Chattanooga Crew 
In Retraining Effort 

The Manpower Development and 
Training Act provides for training pro- 
grams designed to meet the needs for 
additional trained workers, to provide 
upgrading or skill improvement training, 
or to retrain workers whose skills have 
become obsolete. Such programs may 
be administered by any employer or 
group, industry, labor, community, or 
others who may be qualified to conduct 
effective training for the labor market. 

Such a program was recently initiated 
in Chattanooga through the Apprentice- 
ship Training Committee of the Tri- 
State Carpenters District Council of 
Chattanooga and vicinity. 

In most cities vocational schools pro- 
vide the training for this program. The 
Hobart Welding School in Troy, Ohio, 
for example, has trained 40 under the 
act. However, in other cities where no 
such training facilities are available, other 
provisions have been made by renting 
equipment, buildings, and for hiring in- 
structors. 

The latter was the case in Chattanooga, 
where a 10-month welding training pro- 
gram was initiated recently for Carpen- 
ters and Bricklayers. The program, first 
of its kind in the United States, got under- 
way with a registration of 230, and if a 
75 percent attendance record is main- 
tained, there probably will be other pro- 
grams of this type initiated throughout 
the country. 

Many are responsible for initiating and 




Left to right: George L. Henegar; W. W. Orr; C. C. York; Joe De Matteo; Jack 
Chandler, trainee, member, Carpenters Local 74; and Kenneth Maynor, instructor, 
member, Carpenters Local 74. 



administering the Chattanooga program, 
particularly Joe De Matteo, Field Rep- 
resentative for the Bureau of Apprentice- 
ship and Training. U. S. Department of 
Labor; George L. Henegar. Business Rep- 
resentative of Tri-State Carpenters Dis- 
trict Council who is chairman of the pro- 
gram; Walter Lerch, Vice President of 
Garland Sherman Company, who is secre- 
tary of the program; Clayton Wyatt. 
Assistant Business Representative and 
member of the apprentice committee; and 
Howard F. Gray, Financial Secretary, 
Carpenters Local 74 and member of the 
apprentice committee. 



DON'T PLAY WITH MATCHES 


• 
Be Sure Fires Are Out— Cold! 


• 
Only YOU Can Prevent Forest Fires 




Committee responsible for initiating Chattanooga Carpenters and Brick Masons Weld- 
ing Training Program: (seated, left to right) Robert Elmore, Director of Public Af- 
fairs, Chattanooga; V. V. Abram, Superintendent of Personnel, E. J. Du Pont de 
Nemours & Co. Construction, Chattanooga; George Henegar, Chairman of Chatta- 
nooga Carpenters and Brick Masons Welding Program, Chattanooga; W. W. Orr, 
International Representative for Carpenters, Chattanooga; John Speer, Assistant Re- 
gional Director, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training, U. S. Department of Labor, 
Atlanta, Ga.; Wendell M. Jones, District Representative, Hobart Brothers Company, 
Chattanooga. (Standing) H. M. Garrett, State Supervisor for Tennessee, Bureau of 
Apprenticeship and Training, U. S. Bureau of Labor, Nashville; W. W. Orr, Jr., Secre- 
tary of Tri-State Carpenters District Council, Chattanooga; Stan Markuson, MDTA 
Specialist, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training, U. S. Bureau of Labor, Washing- 
ton, D. C; Charles Parsons, Director of Vocational Education, Chattanooga; Joe 
De Matteo, Field Representative, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training, U. S. Bu- 
reau of Labor, Chattanooga; C. C. York, International Representative of Carpenters, 
Nashville; Howard Gray, Secretary of Carpenters Local 74, Chattanooga. 



Lee makes the kind 
of Carpenter Over- 
alls with double 
prong bib buttons 
that can't rust 
away, seams that 
can't rip out and 
suspenders that 
can't slip off. 
Look for Carpenter 
Overalls from Lee! 




Designed by 
and for 
Carpenters! 




MAY, 1965 



27 



POWER GUN 

Opens Sewer 
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THINK OF IT! 




CLEANS PIPE 
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• FREE BOOK tells 

HOW TO CLEAN ALL DRAINS 

(Helpful Data) 



Presto — one shot of this New Pressure Gun trig- 
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when struck by hammer-blow in TOILETS, 
SINKS. URINALS, BATHTUBS & SEWERS 
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MAKE $20 to $30 EXTRA 
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1). C. Leader Passes 




WASHINGTON, D. C— President 
Carroll Trumblc of Carpenters Local 132, 
recently passed away. He is shown above, 
left, with his son, last Christmas. 

Horn July 15, 1891; initiated into Lo- 
cal 132, December 18, 1917, he was 
elected President of Local 132 in .Inne, 
1961; re-elected .Tune, 1963 and died in 
office. He was a delegate to The Car- 
penters District Council and a delegate 
to the Greater Washington Central Labor 
Council. He served on numerous wage 
committees and jurisdictional disputes 
and was instrumental in the establishment 
of the local's welfare and pension plans. 

He was found dead in his bed February 
23, 1965. 

Receives 25-Year Pin 




KEWANEE, ILL.— Lowell Morrison, 
right, president of Local 154 in Kewanee, 
presented a 25-year pin for continuous 
membership to Bud Baker, financial sec- 
retary of the local for the past 18 years. 
The presentation was made at the an- 
nual dinner-dance of the local. 

Clancy, seated, 65-year member, be- 
ing congratulated by the President of 
Local 1244, Ivor Miller. 



Suit-of-the-Month 

LOUISVILLE, KY.— The State 
AFL-CIO runs a "Suit-of-the-Month 
Club." Purpose of the Club is to file 
at least one court action every 30 days 
against cities and towns that have 
adopted local right-to-work laws. The 
name of each month's municipal target 
is drawn from a jar. 




Quality Vaughan Hammers met up 
with the multi-purpose Superbar and 
created a tool box sensation . . . 
What a Vaughan Hammer can't do — 
Superbar can! 

Vaughan Hammers are the result 
of over ninety years of know-how in 
quality hand tool manufacturing. 
They're better built and better bal- 
anced — just a couple of reasons 
they're known as the "swingin'est" 
hammers made! And a hammer's first 
and best mate is the Vaughan Super- 
bar. It's the all-purpose tool that prys, 
lifts, scrapes, pounds, pulls, and even 
cuts nails! You have to use Super- 
bar to know how many jobs it can do. 
And it fits in any tool box. 

When you buy, buy Vaughan quality 
. . . quality that goes steady for you. 

Write for details. 

VAUGHAN & BUSHNELL 

MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

135 S. LaSalle Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60603 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Lumber and Sawmill Local Presents Pins 




THE DALLES, ORE. — The first members of the Lumber and Sawmill Workers 
Local 2785 to receive 25-year pins were recently honored at the Local meeting. Pre- 
sentation of the pins was made by Julius Yiancour, assistant to Earl Hartley, exec- 
utive secretary of the Western Council of the Lumber and Sawmill Workers. 

Receiving pins were: standing — Edger R. Welsh, John A. Dickenson, Reuben A. 
Johnson, and Arthur V. Means. Seated — William A. Neuman and Walter I. Driver. 

Not present at the meeting but eligible for a pin was Harvey Tracy. All of these 
members are employed at the J. H. Baxter and Company, except Reuben Johnson 
who is retired. 



California Local Honors 40 25-Year Men 




MARTINEZ, CALIF. — Carpenters Local 2046 recently honored 40 of its veteran 
members eligible to wear 25-year service pins. Pins were presented at ceremonies 
following a regular business meeting in January. Winter weather and illness prevented 
many old timers from being present, but the following, shown above, were present: 
Front row, from left — Harry Elliott, Robert Kellog, Dave Healy, Stanley Stefick, 
John Lukens, Vernon Borem, Ralph Antrim, and Ernest Dimmick. Back row — 
General Representative Clarence Briggs, who presented the pins; John Freeman; Al 
Figone, president of the Bay County District Council; Anthony Ramos, executive sec- 
retary of the California State Council; Charlie Newell, representing James Pierce, 
who was ill; Leonard Benson; A. J. Kinney; Dean Frazier, and G. P. Heard. 



Correction 

In the March issue of The Carpenter 
we published a news item from Local 
633, Granite City, Illinois, in which we 



incorrectly reported that a $140-million 
expansion program for Granite City Steel 
Company was planned for East St. Louis. 
The big project is actually scheduled for 
erection on a site at Granite City. 



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BARCLITE SUSPENDED CEILINGS 




MAY, 1965 



29 



File Saws 

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Edward Staser Receives 
Watch Upon Retirement 




LOUISVILLE, KY. — Edward Staser, 
Local 2516, Plywood and Furniture 
Workers, on the right, receives a watch 
from Andy Sayers, business represent- 
ative for the local union. The watch was 
presented to Staser upon his disability 
retirement from the General Plywood 
Corporation in New Albany, Ind. 

Fifty Silver Dollars, Too 



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y 



MASON CITY, IA.— George Thomp- 
son, right, of Local 1313 looks over old 
carpenter's tools with another veteran of 
the trade, Jacob Ravenstad. Thompson 
was honored for his 50th year of member- 
ship. Besides the half-century pin, he 
also received 50 silver dollars and a 
special apron. 



The child was diseased at birth, 
stricken with a hereditary ill that only 
the most vital men are able to shake off. 
I tnean poverty — the most deadly and 
prevalent of all diseases. 

—EUGENE O'NEILL. 



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30 



THE CARPENTER 



Remodeling Project at Orphanage 




/' 




Local Union 490 of Passaic, recently donated its services to remodel a recreation 
room for the Nutley Sons of Italy Orphanage, George Collura, president of the local 
union, has announced. Among those who assisted in the project were, left to right, 
above: Steven Nemeth, William Bonnema, business agent; Sister Gina Maria, of the 
Orphanage; Rocco De Biasi: and William Holda. Absent when the photo was taken 
were the following: George Miller, George Cioce, Sr., George Cioce, Jr. Michael 
Zboray, and John Rypkema, William Collari, from Local 1939. 

Local 1023 Pin Presentations 




ALLIANCE, O. — Local 1023 of Alliance, presented 25-year pins (from the left) to: 
William Plajer, Harry Unger, Paul Blanchard, H. C. Russell, Joseph Barkdoll and 
George Thai. In the absence of local president, Carl Binius, George Sanford (on the 
right) conducted the ceremony and presented the pins. 



HOW GOOD A DRIVER? 

Continued from page 21 

sponse on the questionnaire, repro- 
duced at the bottom of this page. His 
score is as private as he wants to keep 
it. His motivation, however, may be 
to join a driver improvement course. 
As the viewer fills out his test form 
at home, he will actually be competing 
against the entire nation. Since it 
wouldn't be possible to grade everyone 
in the country, a scientifically selected 
sample will take the test and be rep- 
resentative of the nation. The person 
at home will grade himself (answers 
will be given on the show) and he or 
she can then compare his score with 
other drivers as represented by the 
sample. A special IBM computer will 



be utilized to get the results of the 
selected sample to those taking the 
tests at home so they can quickly 
compare results. 

This show offers an excellent op- 
portunity for carpenter locals across 
the country to use their union meeting 
halls during the telecast to take the 
tests. A regular meeting could be 
scheduled for the night of the show 
and this could be billed as a special 
safety meeting. Then at the end of the 
meeting forms could be compared, 
and the safety telecast discussed in 
detail. 

Be sure to save the form on Page 
21 so you can take the test and 
make an honest appraisal of your own 
driving. Who knows — the life you save 
may be your own! 



these 

unique 

features 

make 

True Temper 

Rockef hammers 

worth more 

Heft the famous Rocket and feel the 
sureness and comfort in its unique 
cushioned grip... a special material 
that just won't slip— wet, dry or with 
gloves. Feel extra driving power and 
precise balance in the professional 
octagon head. Extra confidence in 
the tubular-steel shaft, permanently 
bonded to the head. And more rug- 
ged strength in the True Temper 
quality steel it's made of. No. A16. 

Available throughout 
the. United States and Canada. 



J3l I RUE /EM PER 



MAY, 1965 



31 



You Can Develop A Profitable 
Business on A Shoestring 

Make $5.00 an Hour in 
Your Own Home 





91-Year-01«1 Member 






I wish ihore was spaco here to print the 
hundreds of letters received from men I've 
put in business with the Be/saw Sharp-All. 
With this precision machine you can sharpen 
all popular household, garden and shop 
tools easily and quickly. You need no pre- 
vious experience ... no inventory, no sell- 
ing, no space to rent. 

I've Done It for 40,000 Men 

I have been helping men get into this pro- 
fitable business for over 30 years. I'll finance 
you to get started . . . give you all the in- 
structions and help you'll need to really 
succeed. I'll keep you informed HOW oth- 
ers are making big cash profits every day. 
No salesman will call. No obligation. 

So don't delay. Send coupon for FREE 
book today. 

1 TA N~~ F7ELDT "President"" " 
j R.-i-ow Sharp-All Company 

7125 Field Bldg., 
I Kansas City, Mo. 64111 

I Na 



City 





Hr! 



3 easy ways to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedbor "88" for all electric drills. 
Bores foster in any wood at any angle. Sizes Vi" 
to %(,", S-75 each. %" to 1", $.85 each. l>/ 8 " 
to \]/ 2 " , SI. 30 each. 

2. Irwin No. 11 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, 7 /&" to 
3". Only $4.20. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, 5e" to 1%" '- Only $3.80. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
Gives double- cutter boring action. Only 16 turns 
to bore 1" holes through 1" wood. Sizes Vi" to 
1)4". As low as SI. 15 each. 

EVERY IRWIN BIT made of high analysis 
steel, heat tempered, machine-sharpened 
and highly polished, too. Buy from your 
independent hardware, building supply or 
lumber dealer. 

Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 
only $1.25 for 50 ft. size 
New and improved Irwin self-chalking design. 
Precision mode of aluminum alloy. Practically 
damage-proof. Fits the pocket, fits 
the hand. 50 ft. and 100 ft. sizes. Get 
Strait-Line Micro-Fine chalk refills and 
Tite-Snap replacement lines, too. Get 
a perfect chalk line every time. 

IRWIN Wil sro ,on ' 

every bit as good as the name 





MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA — 

History was once anain made in our 
Brotherhood as well as in Local 1244. On 
January 24, 1965, the local union had 
the honor and privilege to present to 
J. P. Clancy his 65-year membership 
button. 

Born on June 28, 1874, Clancy at the 
age of 91 years, is believed to be the 
oldest member, in age as well as in mem- 
bership, in the Province of Quebec. His 
initiation date is February 13, 1897, 
which makes 68 years continuous mem- 
bership. 

It was at the turn of the century, 
when our Brotherhood was organizing in 
Canada, that young members such as 
Brother Clancy, foresaw the future in 
joining together to create a stronger force 
to obtain better wages and working con- 
ditions. 

Signboard Assist 



^GARMENT WORKERS 
of MOLESTER 

'LOCAL UNIONS ARE BACKING YOU FOR 
BETTER W0RKIH& C0NDITI0NE5. JOB 
SECURITY £, HIGHER WAGES... wrbos m 



-^m^m&STf 




McALESTER, OKLA.— Local 986 of 
McAlester recently joined other unions 
in its section of the Southwest to assist 
the International Ladies' Garment Work- 
ers Union in organizing a lingerie plant. 
Union carpenters produced the sign, and 
union painters did the lettering. 



Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EN- 
II RE length of Common-IIip-Vnlley 
and Jack rafters completely worked 
• >iii for you. The flattest pilch is Vi 
inch rise to 12 inch run . Pitches in- 
crease U inch ris icli time until 

the steep pitch of -4" rise to VI" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
ings for each pitch. The smallest 
width is % inch and they increase 
Vi" each time until they cover a 50 
foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Hip, Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
pitches. 

A hip roof is 48'-9Vi" wide. Pitch 
is 7%" rise to 12" run. You can pick 
out the length of Commons, Hips and 
Jacks and the Cuts in ONE MINUTE. 
Let us prove it, or return your money. 



Getting the lengths of rafters by tho spat, and 
the method of setting up the tables is fully pro- 
tected by tho 1917 & 1044 Copyrights 



Price $2.r,0 Postpaid. If C.O.D. fee extra. 

Canada send $2.75 Foreign Postal M. O. or 

Bank Money Order payable in U. S. dollars. 

Canada can not take C.O.D. orders. 

California add 4% tax. 10(i each. 

A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 40S Palo Alto, Calif. 94302 



STAIRWAY 

CONSTRUCTION 
MADE EASY 




With the aid of the 

STAIRWAY CONSTRUCTION 
HANDBOOK 

It gives you complete, detailed, easy-to- 
follow instructions on how to lay out, meas- 
ure and cut for a more perfect stairway. 

With illustrations, photos and plain lan- 
guage, you are shown the method that years 
of experience has proven the fastest, most 
practical and efficient. 

Even with no previous experience, this 
step-by-step method will enable anyone to 
build a good stairway the first time and 
every time. Increase your skill and self-con- 
fidence now. 

Convenient pocket size, plastic bound 
— lays flat open, 16 pages of pictures. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

$2.50 postpaid Washingtonians add 4% 

DOUGLAS FUGITT 

11347 N.E. 124th St., Kirkland, Wash. 98033 



ORDER TODAY 

Send Stairway Constroction Handbook. 
Enclosed is $2.50 □ Check □ M.O. 



Name - _ 
Address 
City 



State 



32 



THE CARPENTER 




IN M 



ORIAM 



L.U. NO. 1, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bukala, George 
Clouter, T. G. 
Duchen, Sam 
Friberg, Tage 
Hellyar. Cecil J. 
Howison, James 
Jankun, Anton 
Jordan, Thomas F. 
Moran, James J. 
Nelson. Nels M. 
Olszewski. Casimir 
Palmer, Edward E. 
Reusch, Karl 
Sitar, Stefan 
Vlchek, Vincent 

L.U. NO. 2, 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 

Daniel. Paul A. 

L.U. NO. 7, 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN 

Anderson, Carl G. 
Benson, David 
Clauson, Carroll 
Fait, Joseph 
Hahn, Albert 
Hegg. Gunnar 
Holmes, Alex 
Johnson, Andrew 
Kasmar, Luke 
Morse, Louis 
Nashlund. Nels E. 
Nelson, Oscar E. 
Orner, Edwin 
Shoberg. G. E. 
Smith. Glen I. 
Snodgrass, A. E. 
Stark, Roy 
Thompson, Lou 
Thompson, Walter 
Stohl, Fred 
Wennerstrom, Gust 

L.U. NO. 12, 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Phillips, Andrew 
Schoonmaker. James 

L.U.NO. 14, 

SAN ANTONIO. TEXAS 

Brissenden. C. W. 
Dossey. Thomas H. 
Eidson, B. M. 
Gilmore. J. C. 
Hayes, Carlie 
Lawless. R. R. 
Reinhard. Paul 
Sammons. Herbert 
Stroud. D. U. 
Swomley, Daniel 
Treff, A. G. 

L.U. NO. 15, 
HACKENSACK, N. J. 

Barr, William 
Meek. Roderick 

L.U. NO. 33. 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Bowdin, John 



Bradley. Samuel 
Damico, Peter 
Labbe, Anthony 
Langille. Oliver 
MacKenzie. Hugh J. 
Simmons. Frank C. 
Warren, Lloyd 
Wirtz, Charles E. 

L.U. NO. 35, 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Lee. John Allen 

L.U. NO. 36, 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Showalter, Walter H. 

L.U. NO. 40, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Boisse. Joseph 
Curll, Kenneth 
Ihley, Charles 
Mason, Roger 
Sangeleer, William 
Young, Alex 

L.U. NO. 44, 
CHAMPAIGN, ILL. 

Ponder. Howard 
Radmaker, Ernest 

L.U. NO. 50. 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 
Brock. Isaac 
Coleman. J. Paul 
Lynch, Charles Andrew 

L.U. NO. 55 
DENVER, COLO. 

Dickerson. Ray 
Seaton, Richard 

L.U. NO. 61. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Brandes, Lawrence B. 
Bryant, William D. 
Curtis. J. O. 
Remm, H. F. 

L.U. NO. 62. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Reinhart. Randulfsen 
Seth. Nelson 

L.U. NO. 67. 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Bostick, Michael 
Boutin. Homer F. 
Chapman, Paul 
Coulombe. Alphonsus 
Curran, Herbert 
Farrell. Edward J. 
Kelly, John J. 
King, John W. 
Murphy. Cornelius 
Robertshaw, Thomas 
Wentzell, Robert 

L.U. NO. 72, 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Alaimo. Charles 
Nowicki, Walter 



L.U. NO. 89, 
MOBILE, ALA. 

Vickery, Jessie R. 

L.U. NO. 94, 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

D'Arezzo, Bennie 
DcLuca, Joseph 
DiFilippo, Clement 
Lavigne, Gabriel 
Levesque, Robert J. 
Thibault, Albert 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Finch. George W. 
Forster, Frederick 

L.U. NO. 103. 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Guthrie, Charles 
Jenkins, Henry T. 
Lofton, H. P.. Sr. 

L.U. NO. 112, 
BUTTE, MONT. 

Boyer, Lewis P. 
Gaffney, John 
Gribble. James 
Jones. George 
Knuckey, Joseph H. 
PafFhausen. Earl 
Raita. Thomas 
Siem, Kris 
Thomas, Richard H. 
Walters. William H. 
Wolffs, Charles H. 

L.U. NO. 135, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Nassau. Philip 
Pellettieri, R. J. 
Sokol, Sol 
Weinberg, Nathan 

L.U. NO. 139, 
JERSEY CITY, N. Y. 

Morley, James 

L.U. NO. 142, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Mossneau, Jacob 

L.U. NO. 144, 
MACON, GA. 

Tuck, Joseph L. 

L.U. NO. 159, 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 

McWaters. William F. 
Shuler, Ralph W. 
Vickery, A. B. 

L.U. NO. 162, 

SAN MATEO, CALIF. 

Anderson, Joseph 
Brink, Harrison S. 
Davis, Dan 
Feige. Alphie. H. 
Freschet. Antonio 
Gentry, Luther 
Hickman, Leroy 



L.U. NO. 174, 
JOLIET, ILL. 

Girard, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 188, 
YONKERS, N. Y. 

Carton. Richard V. 
Zahradka, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEXAS 

Bishop, L. D. 
Chappell, John B. 
Huse, E. W. 
Morton, Eugene W. 
Reinle, Otto 

L.U. NO. 200, 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Barclay, Harry 
Biggs, Richard 
Pacoe, Victor 

L.U. NO. 211, 
PITTSBURG, PA. 

Glover, William 
Pearce, Clarence 

L.U. NO. 215, 
LAFAYETTE, IND. 

Johnson, Frank W. 

L.U. NO. 261, 
SCRANTON, PA. 

Davis, John H. 
Kearney, Morley 
Marullo. Paul 
Osborn, Joseph 
Predenkoski. Stanley 

L.U. NO. 275, 
NEWTON, MASS. 

Hopwood, Guy 

L.U. NO. 287, 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Bell, Merle R. 

L.U. NO. 298, 

LONG ISLAND CITY 

N. Y. 

Schrempp, Karl 

L.U. NO. 301, 
NEWBURGH, N. Y. 

Parrella, Stephen 

L.U. NO. 311, 
JOPLIN, MO. 

Roper, Earl 
Tucker, Garland R. 
Wisdom, Onie 

L.U. NO. 322, 
NIAGARA FALLS, 

N. Y. 

Misch, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 325. 
PATERSON, N. J. 

Beun, John 
Krugman, Louis 
Quackenbush. Nat 
Van Goor, John 



Van Heste, John 
Wieman, Frank 

L.U. NO. 349, 
ORANGE, N. J. 

Magnuson, Martin 
Wiggins, Afred 

L.U. NO. 355, 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 

Shore, Stanley 

L.U. NO. 357, 
ISLIP, N. Y. 

Nelson, James 
Rusy, Andrew 

L.U. NO. 359, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Mueller, Nicholas 
Perry, John O. 

L.U. NO. 362, 
PUEBLO, COLO. 

Carlson, George J. 

L.U. NO. 368. 
ALLENTOWN, PA. 

Rizzotto, Robert 

L.U. NO. 369, 
NORTH 
TONAWANDA, N. Y. 

Dahl, Lewis A. 
McRae, John D. 

L.U. NO. 406, 
BETHLEHEM, PA. 

Fluck, Wilmer 

L.U. NO. 422, 

NEW BRIGHTON, PA. 

Sheerer, Park L. 

L.U. NO. 430, 
WILKENSBURG, PA. 

Allison, Harry 

L.U. NO. 488, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

, Anderson, Gunnar 
Bruno, Guiseppe 
Ekholm, Fred 
Graff, Herbert 
Guarino, Santi 
Horbach, Anton 
Kreisler, Sam 
Lilliedahl, Charles 
Lopez, Juan 
Wilson. George 

L.U. NO. 494, 
WINDSOR, ONT. 

Sochaski, Julian 

L.U. NO. 529, 
CAMDEN, ARK. 

Love, Lowell 

L.U. NO. 532, 
ELMIRA, N. Y. 

Rumsey. T. P. 

L.U. NO. 543, 
MAMARONECK, N. Y. 

Beceiglia, Patsy 



MAY, 1965 



33 



Cherbrock, Nicholas 
Olson, ( )scar 
Petrosillo, Pat 
Socoski. George 

L.U. NO. 574, 
MIDDLETOWN, N. Y. 

Brown, Arthur A. 

L.U. NO. 586. 

SACRAMENTO, 

CALIF. 

Mullen. Ira J. 

L.U. NO. 608, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Handy. William 
Lynam. Thomas 
Pumo, Paul 

L.U. NO. 679, 
MONTPKI.IER, VT. 

Ainsworth. Paul 

L.U. NO. 695, 
STERLING, ILL. 

Grim. William C. 

L.U. NO. 710, 

LONG BEACH, CALIF. 

Baines, Fred 
Baker. William J. 
McGee. Raymond 
Salisbury. C. W. 

L.U. NO. 727, 
HIALEAH, FLA. 

Evans, James K. 
Mosley. Layne E. 

L.U. NO. 746, 
SOUTH NORWALK, 
CONN. 

Fairchild. Frederick 

L.U. NO. 764, 
SHREVEPORT, LA. 

Rigdon. H. W. 
Stevens. C. A. 

L.U. NO. 813, 
CARBONDALE, PA. 

Wall. George 



L.U. NO. 819. 

WEST PALM BEACH, 

FLA. 

Pierce, C. O. 

L.U. NO. 899, 
PARKERSBLRG, 
W. VA. 

Hall. G. M. 

Stewart. Guy 

SAN BERNARDINO, 
CALIF. 

Calfas. Louis 
Culler. E. C. 
Gonzales. S. B. 
Hauer, Arthur P. 
Jordan, C. A. 
Nelson. Ragnar 
Stafford. Harry E. 

L.U. NO. 950, 
LYNBROOK, N. Y. 

Huestis. Wilbur 
Schmitt. Joseph H. 

L.U. NO. 978, 
SPRINGFIELD, MO. 

Carter. Lawrence A. 
Gault. Henry 
Wommack. Floyd 

L.U. NO. 982, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Helzerman. Albert F. 
Rice. William M. 

L.U. NO. 991, 
WINCHESTER, MASS. 

Wilson. Roy W. 

L.U. NO. 1042, 
PLATTSBURGH, N. Y. 

Drapeau. Alfred 
LaBarre. Henry 
Ryan, Robert D. 

L.U. NO. 1053, 
MILWAUKEE. MINN. 
Nitschke, Fred 
Radtke. Herman 



L.U. NO. 1075, 
HUDSON, N. Y. 
Hagadone, Marcy 

L.U. NO. 1089, 
PHOENIX, ARIZ. 

McNabb. Fred 
Williams, Charles L. 

L.U. NO. 1114. 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Freimark. Ferrol 

L.U. NO. 1140. 
HARBOR CITY, CALIF 

Mann. C. H. 
Simo. William F. 
Sullivan. William A. 

L.U. NO. 1165. 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 

Reid. Charles M. 

L.U. NO. 1172, 
BILLINGS, MONT. 

Fish, Garold 
Haverland, Claude 
Lewis. James 
Stiles. Warren 
Wimmer, C. A. 

L.U. NO. 1209, 
NEWARK, N. J. 

Scott. William 
Snyder. Herman 

L.U. NO. 1224, 
EMPORIA, KANS. 

Arndt. J. F. 

L.U. NO. 1281, 
ANCHORAGE, 
ALASKA 

Fisk, Paul 
Lander. Arndt 
Leonard. Ronald 
Pichler. Joseph 
Reed, Paul H. 
Steele, Cliff 
Yaun. Porter 





"If 1 were a factory 






worker, a working 






man on the railroads 




^H^^^H 


or a wage earner of 
any sort, 1 would un- 
doubtedly join the 




fi J0M 


union of my trade. If 




1 disapproved of its 
policy, 1 would join to 
fight that policy. If 




i^wr^"*M7^ 


the union leaders 




were dishonest, 1 






would join to put 






them out. 1 believe in 






a union, and 1 believe 






all men who are ben- 




efited by the union 


^^'^W 


are morally bound to 


help to the extent of 


m m V 


their power in the 


^ Ik \ W 


common interest ad- 


^^ \ W 


vanced by the union." 


V 


. . . President 




Theodore Roosevelt 



L.U. NO. 1337, 
TUSCALOOSA, ALA. 

Bell. Hugh B. 

L.U. NO. 1367, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Pearson. Sanl'ord 

L.LI. NO. 1402, 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Chappell. R. L. 
Cuddihy, John J. 
Phillips. J. R. 

L.U. NO. 1423, 
CORPUS CHRISTI, 
TEXAS 

Meyers. William A. 
Satlerwhite, C. L. 

L.U. NO. 1478, 
REDONDO BEACH, 
CALIF. 

Waller. Virgil Ervin 

L.U. NO. 1511, 
SOUTHAMPTON, N. Y. 

Hubbard. Roland L. 

L.U. NO. 1518, 
GULFPORT, MISS. 

Baker. Luna Ray 
Johnson, J. C. 

L.U. NO. 1524, 
MILES CITY. MONT. 

Bredok, Andrew 

L.U. NO. 1525 
PRINCETON, ILL. 

Swanson. Raymond J. 

L.U. NO. 1529, 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Alcock, Leroy 
Andrews. Elmer L. 
Bollen. Leroy 
Bost. Ray 
Fisher. Harry 
Goff, George 
Harrison. Gilbert 
Howell. Virgil 
Moore. Ray 
Robinson, Carl 
Smiddy. Jack 
Thomasson, O. E. 
Tuckness. William H. 
Weeks. Roy 
Willig. Karl F. 

L.U. NO. 1573, 
WEST ALLIS, WIS. 

Magnuson, Henry 
Rathburn, Ray 

LU. NO. 1683, 

EL DORADO, ARK. 

McDiarmid, Troy 

L.U. NO. 1723, 
COLUMBUS, GA. 

Brown. John D. 
Carlisle. N. C. 
Chadwick. T. B. 
Ellerbee, O. L., Sr. 
Glass, C. C. 



Lane. T. R. 

Windsor. George W., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 1786. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Binka, John 

L.U. NO. 1815, 
SANTA ANA, CALIF. 

Culp. Oscar L. 
Jones. Albert L. 
Steward. Clyde 
Virta, Oskar 

L.U. NO. 1822, 

FORT WORTH, TEXAS 

Joyce, Bert 
Sprinkle, J. H. 

L.U. NO. 1832, 
ESCANABA, MICH. 

( Carlson, E. Olof 

L.U. NO. 1835, 
WATERLOO, IOWA 

Avis, Roy E. * 

L.U. NO. 1967, 
SANTURCE, 
SAN JUAN, P. R. 

Laboy, Agapito Santiago 

L.U. NO. 2151, 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 

Barnett, Otis 
Carter, Loyless B. 
Minihan, John J. 

L.U. NO. 2235, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Fornataro, Mike 
Mitchell, Paul 
Sassone, Frank 

L.U. NO. 2250, 
RED BANK, N. J. 

Beers, Cecil 
Brand, Seymore 
Fuschette. Anthony 
Hyers, James H. 
Norman, Charles 
Olsen, Chris 
Padgett, Otis D. 
Raine, Clarence 
Sieben. William 
Tantum, Harry 

L.U. NO. 2261, 
FORT MYERS, FLA. 

Eddy, Earl J. 

L.U. NO. 2288, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Smith, Charles F. 
Tillman, Arthur 

L.U. NO. 2396, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Erickson, Trygve 
Larson, Lawrence 
Minear, Charles 
Ronmark, Ole 
Sande, Gust 
Seppi, Elmer 

L.U. NO. 2435, 
INGLEWOOD, CALIF. 

Hamilton, Clarence E. 
Hansen, Milton L. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



Wisconsin Deer Hunt 




By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Brother Goetz at 0216 S.W. Iowa Street, Portland, Ore. 97201 



More Sturgeon News 

Recent column item on sturgeon by 
Bill Fenger of Sheboygan, Wisconsin, 
prompts more on the subject. 

From Kenneth E. Skonberg, a mem- 
ber of Local 80, Chicago: 

"We have some pretty good sturgeon 
fishing about 160 miles north of The 
Windy City. Enclosed is a photo of a 
lunker I was fortunate enough to take 
out of Lake Winnebago, through the ice 
by spear, in a special winter season in 
Wisconsin. It tipped the scales at 40 
pounds and measured 52 inches from 
nose to tail." 

From Gilbert Wilson of Jerome, Idaho, 
a member of Local 1258. Pocatello: 

"I darn near got more than I bar- 
gained for on a winter (January) fishing 
trip to the Snake River. Being rigged for 
lighter game with twelve-pound test line 
and a five foot casting reel, I tied into 
a finny moose, a sturgeon that checked 
out close to 50 pounds. It took me 45 
minutes to land 'old fighter' who had 
things his way in that fast water." 




Mountain Lion Cubs 

Somewhere along life's highway an 
envelope containing a photo and letter 
from Suzanne (Suzie) Lee Brasher, wife 




Kenneth Skonberg and 40-lb. catch 
MAY, 1965 



Brasher brothers and lions 

of Charlie Brasher, a member of Local 
844 in Reseda, California, was lost. Con- 
sequently I don't know where to send the 
lures. But. as I said, I do have the photo 
and letter which follows: 

"Two brothers, Charlie (Chuck) and 
Jim Brasher, both members of Local 
844, returning home from a deer hunting 
trip to Grand Junction, Colorado in mid- 
December, this past year, bagged a pair 
of mountain lions, eight-foot specimens, 
in the Salina Canyon. The enclosed pic 
seals the story. 

Jim's wife Sharon and I enjoyed the 
trip as much as the men. We also brought 
back a deer each and a brace of Christ- 
mas trees. It was a most memorable ex- 
perience for us all." 

If Mrs. Brasher will take the trouble 
to drop me a card at 0216 S.W. Iowa, 
Portland, Oregon, 97201, I'll be happy 
to fire back some killer dillers. 

Mighty Beaver Dam 

Probably the longest beaver dam on 
record was located on the Jefferson 
River near Three Forks, Montana. It 
measured 2,140 feet in length. 



Bucks grow on trees 

Shades of the deer hunting season just 
past, pickings were great in Wisconsin 
last year, according to a recent letter and 
snapshot from Albert G. Evans of Birch- 
wood, Wisconsin, a member of Local 
2711. 

Al's snapshot might indicate that the 
Wisconsin bucks grow on trees. "Taint 
so," says Al, "we had to work for them." 

"There are six bucks hanging in this 
tree," says Al, "and one doe on the 
ground." Six members of the Evans fam- 
ily and brother-in-law Russ Schwoerer 
participated in the hunt. Additional mem- 
bers of the Carpenters' Union on the 
hunt were George Evans, president of 
Local 2711; Russ Schwoerer, and George 
and Bill Evans. Others on the success- 
ful hunt were Al's father, Gomer Evans. 
his wife, Lois Evans and brother Ed. 

Al modestly admits that the hunting 
last November in northern Wisconsin 
"wasn't too bad." 

Cheesecloth Sinkers 

Saltchuck anglers will do well to take 
a tip from the surf fisherman who ply 
the rocky California coast. They use 
small squares of cheesecloth filled with 
sand or gravel as sinkers. 

If snagged in the rocks, the cloth rips, 
freeing line and saving expensive lures, 
hooks and swivels. 

Tips On Nylon Line 

Don't worry if your monofilament ny- 
lon line has been exposed to extremely 
cold temperatures. Cold has no effect on 
the tensile strength breakload of a pre- 
mium monofilament. But don't use line 
that has been stored on a window sill 
exposed to the sun for the past three 
or four months. Sun can weaken mono- 
filament. 

Normally, fishermen don't have to 
worry about sunlight affecting the prop- 
erties of the line, since much of it is in 
Continued on Page 36 



35 




wear the 
shoe that's 



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OUTDOOR MEANDERINGS 

Continued from Page 35 

the water and little of the same part of 
the line is exposed for long on the reel 
while fishing. 

Lake Muses' Basses 

H. E. Updike of 905 E. Elm Street. 
West Frankfort. Illinois, a member of the 
Carpenters' Union for 44 years and 
Treasurer of Local 1193 for elosc to 17 
years, says his most enjoyable outdoor 
pastime is bass fishing, and on a recent 
junket to Lake Mases, east of Benton. 
Illinois, he amassed a bowed-in-the-mid- 
dle, 10-pound stringer of the largemouth 
variety, largest of which was a 4Vi 
pounder. 

H. E. lauds the finny merit of Lake 
Mases. says it features 37 miles of shore- 
line. 

You May Have A Record! 

That big deer, elk or bear or what- 
have-you-downed this past hunting sea- 
son might be a world record. If you wish 
to find out, write to the Boone and 
Crockett Club. 5 Tudor Place. New York 
17. N. Y. 

They will send you the proper regis- 
tration blank if you specify what animal 
you have downed. The form has de- 
tailed charts and instructions on how to 
measure your trophy. 

Time Out For Fish 

Bill Goetsch of Sacramento, is one 
Californian who'll forever sing the praises 
of Oregon's piscatorial resources. 

Seems like Bill had a couple of hours 
to kill and decided to try his hand for 
salmon in Alsea Bay near the town of 
Waldport. He purchased a one-day 
angling license for a dollar and a one- 
dollar salmon tag. He promptly caught 
an 18-pound Chinook and a nine pound 
silver salmon. Oregon: The land of milk 
and honey — and salmon! 

Packing A Bear 

William Kudler of 1699 Ramble Road. 
Parkland, Pennsylvania, member of Local 
359 says "shootin' them is not the chore 
of packin' them out — not by a long shot. 
One shot from his 30/30 brought down 
a big black bear in Pike county, P. A., 
that dressed out at 275 pounds. It took 
Brother Kudler and a partner three hours 
to pack the brute out — two miles of 
rough, virgin forest, across creeks, land- 
falls and knobs. 

One Less Sly Fox 

Steve Dible of Carey, Ohio, says 
he and his dad. a member of Local 
822 out of Findlay. Ohio, cover a lot 
of acreage in their outdoor meander- 



Last time out for mushrooms, they 
ran across a sly old fox and dad 
nailed it with a well-placed shot from 
his 32 caliber carbine rifle. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



— LAKELAND NEWS- 

B. L. King of Local Union 132, Washington, D. C, arrived at the Home 
March 2, 1965. 

Chester A. Berry of Local Union 428, Fairmont, W. Va., arrived at the 
Home March 8, 1965. 

Gus Spaht of Local Union 718, Havre, Mont., arrived at the Home March 22, 
1965. 

Charles O. Hewitt of Local Union 542, Salem, N. L, arrived at the Home 
March 23. 1965. 

Lars Larsen of Local Union 1456, New York, N. Y., passed away March 1, 
1965. and was buried in the Home cemetery. 

Butler McClintic of Local Union ,854, Madisonville, Ohio, passed away 
March 2. 1965. and was buried in the Home cemetery. 

William Ande of Local Union 15, Hackensack, N. J., passed away March 2, 
1965. and was buried in the Home cemetery. 

Lewis H. Harrison of Local Union 101, Baltimore, Md., passed away 
March 3, 1965, and was buried in Baltimore, Md. 

Olaf R. Johnson of Local Union 62, Chicago, 111., passed away March 14, 
1965, and was buried in Chicago, 111. 

Jiles M. Dunfee of Local Union 1627, Mena, Ark., passed away March 15, 
1965, and was buried in Mena, Ark. 

George J. Hartman of Local Union 340, Wilkinsburg, Pa., passed away 
March 22, 1965, and was buried in Oakmont, Pa. 

William Zichterman of Local Union 271, Chicago, 111., passed away March 
24, 1965, and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Charles A. Hedstrom of Local Union 181, Chicago, 111., passed away March 
28, 1965, and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 



Union Members Who Visited the Home During March 

Einan Frodalius, L.U. 1772, Hicksville, L. 1., N. Y. 
Mauntz Nordin, L.U. 49, Chelmsford, Mass. 
E. H. Sommers, L.U. 105, Cleveland, Ohio. 
A. Martin, L.U. 299, Union City, N. J. 

Frank Osterback, L.U. 1456, N.Y.C., now living Hillside, Lake Rappingers 
Fall. 

Alex Makinen. L.U. 413, South Bend, Ind. 

Maurice W. Howes, L.U. 444, Pittsfield. Mass. 

Alfred W. Jung, L.U. 1889, Downers Grove, 111. 

Herman Reck, L.U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

Peter Fruskiewicz, L.U. 1006. New Brunswick, N. J. 

Stanley G. Milner, L.U. 878, Beverly Farms, Mass. 

Charles H. Milner, L.U. 878. Beverly Farms, Mass. 

Fred Zimmers. L.U. 132, Washington. D. C. 

Stanley E. Nelson, L.U. 7. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Joe Klar, L.U. 7, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Joseph Mella, L.U. 385, New York City. 

Arthur H. Abele, L.U. 716, Zanesville, Ohio. 

Hilton Woodruff, L.U. 11, Cleveland, Ohio 

Frank Meligo. L.U. 11, Cleveland, Ohio 

Junnius Phillips, L.U. 1693, Chicago, 111. 

Harry J. Schleicher. Sr.. L.U. 1285. Allentown, Pa. 

Otto F. Ryberg, L.U. 854, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

William Dahlman, L.U. 224, Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Louis Black, L.U. 210, Stamford. Conn. 

Harold O. Nelson, L.U. 94, Providence, R. I., now living Cranston, R. I. 

Anton J. Liehl, L.U. 1741, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Harry Nelson, L.U. 993, Miami, Fla. 

Gunnar Eckman, L.U. 11, Cleveland, Ohio, now living Melbourne, Fla. 

Fred M. Welch, L.U. 2246. Fennimere, Wis. 

Russell M. Hughs, L.U. 428, Fairmont. W. Va. 

Fairmont, W. Va., now living Inverness. Fla. 
Norwood. Mass. 

188, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Chicago, 111. 

1236. Michigan City, Ind. 



A. C. Hugus, L.U. 428, 

Byron Legge, L.U. 866, 

Daniel Bonomice, L.U. 

Ivar Swanson, L.U. 58, 

Walter F. Wintek, L.U. 

Gust A. Swenson, L.U. 58, Chicago, III. 

John Chivinski, L.U. 132, Washington, D. C. 

Howard Brackenbury, L.U. 12, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Walter Radtke, L.U. 721, Santa Monica. Calif. 

Thomas L. McDade, L.U. 132, Washington. D. C. 

Robert J. Bluvett, L.U. 12, Syracuse. N. Y. 



now living Jefferson, Md. 



AUDEL 

CARPENTERS 

St BUILDERS GUIDES 



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Continued on Page 38 



INSIDE TRADE INFORMATION — 

lor Carpenters, Builders, Joiners, Building Mechanics and 
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Stairs, Hoists, Scaltolds. HOW TO: Kile 8 Set Saws Do 1*1 

Carpenters Arithmetic, Solve Mensuration Problems Esti- 

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I Mail Audel Carpenters & Builders Guides. 4 Vols, on 7 day free 

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You'll Like Being a 
SKILLED 

LOCKSMITHS 



you'll EARN MORE, LIVE BETTER\" 
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LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE 
I)iv. of Technical Home Study Schools 
Dept. 118-055, Little Falls, N. J. 



Earned 

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While 

Train- 
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"WliileL._ 
taking the Lock- 
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I earned enough 
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besides for the 
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soon." J. King, 
Hereford. Tex. 




■qtripmvnt 
LOCKS, MC«° 

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tuppHod 
fat um 

with oslwi* , 



LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE, Dept. 118-055, 
Little Falls, New Jersey Est. 1948 

Please send FREE illustrated Book — "Your Big Op- 
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MAY, 1965 



37 



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Dept. C-5 Rockford, III. 



I AKI I AMI NEWS cont'd 



John Wardin, L.U. 188, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Ralph H. Clcyton. L.U. 2018. Pt. Pleasant. N. J. 

C. Kafod, L.U. 106. Dcs Moines. Iowa. 

Levi Nelson, L.U. 61. Chicago, 111. 

P. Heijn. L.U. 325. Little Falls, N. J. 

Lester W. Williams. L.U. 163, Pcckskill, N. Y. 

Oscar Voss, L.U. 290. Lake Geneva, Wis. 

Charles Griffin, L.U. 53. White Plains, N. Y. 

Geo. M. Clyburne, L.U. 531, Reddington Shores, Fla. 

Charles Hayer, L.U. 455. Summcrvillc. N. J. 

David H. Johanson, L.U. 1307, Evanston, III. 

Victor Kantelo, L.U. 15, Ramsey, N. .1. 

Dicdrich Sturkcn, L.U. 608, Carmil, N. Y. 

Erik Leanderson. L.U. 1573, West Allis, Wis. 

Walfred Peterson, L.U. 80. Chicago, 111., now living Chesterton, Ind. 

Clarence L. Wille, L.U. 839, Des Plaines. III. 

Byron C. Stoddard, L.U. 229, Glen Falls, N. Y. 

Douglas Pearl, L.U. 916, Aurora, III. 

Verner G. Swenson, L.U. 94, Providence, R. I. 

Emit Trachta, L.U. 308, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Evert S. Swanson, L.U. 58. Chicago, 111. 

Otto Christiansen, L.U. 119, Montclair, N. J. 

Dante L. GaHoni, L.U. 885, Woburn, Mass. 

Albert E. Paul, B.A., L.U. 203, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Forrest Handley, L.U. 1426, Elyria. Ohio. 

Peter C. Nelson, L.U. 141, LaGrange Park, 111. 

Hilding Larson, L.U. 1693, Hinsdale, 111. 

Arthur Urban. L.U. 11, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Nelson Van Wyen. L.U. 412, Sayville, L. I., N. Y. 

A. J. Whitely, L.U. 1725, Holly Hill, Fla. 

G. R. Seyben, L.U. 545, Vandergrift, Pa. 

Bertus Venendaal, L.U. 298, L. I. City, N. Y. 

J. B. Bruce. L.U. 671, Cloves. N. Mex. 

Walter Johnson. L.U. 2117, Flushing. N. Y., now living Woodstock, Conn. 

Arne Hantala, L.U. 1456, New York City. 

Peter Thellepes, L.U. 91, Racine, Wis. 

Cornelius Van Osterbridge, L.U. 15, Hackensack, N. J. 

Leo Nieme, L.U. 454, Hi Nella. N. J. 

Charles Roy Booth, L.U. 2072, California, Pa. 

John K. Eastman, L.U. 361, Duluth, Minn. 

Walter V. Sevinski, L.U. 626. Wilmington, Del. 

Clarence T. Brown. L.U. 1128, Plainfield, 111. 

John Bern, Jr., L.U. 325. Paterson, N. J. 

G. Nelson Miller, L.U. 377, Alton, 111. 

Charles D. Campbell, L.U. 186, Steubenville, Ohio, now living Toronto, Ohio. 

S. A. Campbell, L.U. 186. Steubenville, Ohio, now living Toronto, Ohio. 

Paul Pingel. L.U. 1196. Franklin Port, 111. 

Clares Palmberg, L.U. 181. Chicago, 111. 

Joseph A. Barnett, L.U. 685, Chicopee, Mass., now living St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Bernard Hallin, L.U. 1248, St. Charles, 111. 

Robert A. Schade, L.U. 182, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Emile Leske, Jr., L.U. 496, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Harry V. Collum, L.U. 324, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Carl Mehlin, L.U. 927, Danbury, Conn. 

F. E. Grigsby, L.U. 1320, Berlin, Pa. 

Wm. J. Weller, L.U. 12, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Guy O. Baker, L.U. 128, St. Albans, W. Va. 

Vallin Ramsvick, L.U. 1456. Hicksville, N. Y. 

Albert F. Remer, L.U. 1, Chicago, 111., now living Sarasota, Fla. 

H. Schmitz. L.U. 1, Chicago, 111. 

Mathew Masson, L.U. 1784, Chicago, 111. 

John E. Jones, L.U. 18. Hamilton, Canada. 

Enmon R. Smithers, L.U. 12, Syracuse, N. Y. 

R. J. Siebelt, L.U. 1275, Largo, Fla. 

J. J. Knutelsky, L.U. 117, Albany, N. Y. 

Frank Murphy, L.U. 608, New York City. 

Louis J. Viena, L.U. 325, Paterson, N. J. 

Emil Salo, L.U. 623, Danielson, Conn. 

Henry Overeem, L.U. 325, Paterson, N. J. 

T. Kendrick, L.U. 8, Westmont,, N. J. 



Continued on Page 39 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



LAKELAND NEWS cont'd 



Gunnar Nelson, L. U. 181, Chicago, 111. 

Axel Anderson, L.U. 58, Prospect Heights, 111. 

Raymond lohnson, L.U. 15, Tappon, N. Y., now living Largo, Fla. 

Wallace H. Scolpini, L.U. 964, Tappon, N. Y., now living Clearwater, Fla. 

Paul T. Anderson, L.U. 8, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sulo Musakka, L.U. 1331, Buzzards Bay, Mass. 

Allen Musakka, L.U. 1331, Buzzards Bay, Mass. 

Everette H. Dorman, L.U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

Alfonso Vitello, L.U. 1922, Chicago, 111. 

David E. Berg, L.U. 15, Hackensack, N. J., now living Jameston, N. Y. 



Frank Heimann, 
Model Home Builder 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL.— Working alone 
and by hand, with no blueprints, Frank 
J. Heimann. retired member of Local 166, 
Rock Island, recently built two houses in 
five months, but at a scale of % of an 
inch to a foot! 

This is a notable feat since both the 
miniature log cabins were built to exact 
detail. Heimann said that he built the 
"'backwoods cabin" first, reminiscent of 
his own childhood home. The cabin is 
complete with such minute details as an 
old wooden pump and an outhouse sit- 
uated at the rear, including a toilet paper 
roll on the door. 

Some of the pieces in the larger cabin 
are so tiny that Heimann used a magni- 
fying glass while working on them. For 
example, the double windows contain 
little panes of glass and 25 pieces of 
wood each. The doors and gates actually 
open and include an overhead garage 
door which slides open when the latch 
is released. 

The houses, built of wood throughout, 
include chimneys' which at first appear to 
be of stone, and shingles, which are 
actually thin pieces of walnut veneer. 

The newer model, which Heimann 
terms a "suburban home," includes a light 
fixture inside. The light can be snapped 
on by flicking a switch situated inside 
the tiny front door. 

Although Brother Heimann plans to 
build no more homes, his wife states 
that she would like him to make a church 
for her. 




Heimann holds the tools given to him 
when he was eight years old. He proudly 
displays his first four models. Carefully 
protected in glass-enclosed cabinet, these 
include a bobsled, and milk, farm and 
coal wagons. 




Frank Heimann and his two log cabins. 
The one in the foreground represents the 
"backwoods cabin" and the other is his 
"suburban home." 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 



Armco Steel 25 

Audel, Theo 37 

Barclay Manufacturing 29 

Belsaw (Multi-Duty) 30 

Belsaw (Sharp-All) 32 

Chicago Technical College ... 23 

Construction Cost Institute ... 39 

Eliason Stair Gauge 28 

Estwing Manufacturing 38 

Foley Manufacturing 30 

Fugitt, Douglas 32 

Goldblatt Tool 36 



Hydrolevel 30 

Irwin Auger Bit 32 

Lee, H. D 27 

Miller Sewer Rod 28 

Riechers, A 32 

Siegele, H. H 30 

Skil Corporation 16-17 

Stanley Works Back Cover 

Technical Home Study 37 

True Temper 31 

Vaughan & Bushmell 28 

Weinbrenner-Textron Division. 36 



You Can Be 
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CONSTRUCTION 

COST 

ESTIMATOR 



If you have the ambition to become the top 
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home study course, Construction Cost Esti- 
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WHAT WE TEACH 

We teach you to read plans and specifications, 
take off materials, and figure the costs of ma- 
terials and labor. You prepare complete esti- 
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those you will find on every construction proj- 
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that is correct for work in your locality based 
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lesson you correct your own work by compar- 
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You don't need to send lessons back and forth ; 
therefore you can proceed at your own pace. 
When you complete this course you will know 
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ACCURATE LABOR COST DATA 

The labor cost data which we supply is not 
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You don't need to pay us one cent until you 
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'ng business, just return what we have sent 
you and there is no obligation whatever. I£ 
you decide to study our course, pay us $13.25 
monthly for three months, a total of only 
$39.75. 

Send your name and address today — we will 
do the rest. 



CONSTRUCTION COST INSTITUTE 

Dept. C-S65— University Station 
Denver, Colorado 80210 



MAY, 1965 



39 




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M. A. HUTCH ESON, General President 



If There Had Been None of Them, No States Could Exist at All' 



NOW that the passage of a medical care and hospital- 
ization program for the aged is virtually assured in 
this session of Congress, we think it time to turn our 
attentions to the healthy older worker. 

Hardly a day passes that we don't have a personal 
acquaintance with or read in the daily papers of some 
worker over 40 who sees job opportunities pass him by 
because of his age. This is most unfortunate in a nation 
now in its golden age of development and one that will 
need all of its human resources to reach its greatest 
potential. 

The latest available statistics show us that there are 
over 17 million men and women in the 65 years or older 
category, currently the mandatory age for retirement from 
the market place. This compares with just over 10 mil- 
lion in the 18 to 21 year old bracket, the age when youths 
begin to enter the work force. 

Statistics also show that as a nation we are growing 
older. The median age for our entire population is nearly 
30 years and this is increasing yearly. 

So what are we as a nation going to do about our older 
population that still has many years of productive service 
left? Men and women whose wisdom and knowledge 
gained through years of experience could be making a 
great contribution to our nation, but they are being passed 
over by many unwise employers, particularly those em- 
ployers who are afraid they will have to put out a few 
dollars in retirement benefits later on. 

One man who has been campaigning for a better break 
for the older worker is 58-year-old Congressman Clarence 
Long (D., Maryland). 

Congressman Long recently introduced a bill in Con- 
gress to establish within the Labor Department a Bureau 
of Older Workers. Long said the central purpose of the 



proposed agency would be to convince employers, through 
facts and figures, that it is good business to hire workers 
over forty. 

At a recent Conference on Job Barriers Against Older 
Workers, called together by Congressman Long, the rep- 
resentatives of business and labor who attended unani- 
mously agreed that many qualified people as young as 
40 and even 35, are being denied employment because 
of their age. 

In the bill introduced by Congressman Long, the Bu- 
reau of Older Workers would be responsible for leader- 
ship in increasing job opportunities for men and women 
over forty years of age by formulating standards and 
policies to promote the welfare of older workers, to re- 
move arbitrary and artificial job barriers, and otherwise 
to advance opportunities for profitable employment. 

An agency of this type is long overdue. When we look 
about us and see older men and women with unlimited 
talents being shunted aside because of their age it makes 
us wonder. What if Winston Churchill had been forced 
to retire from public service in 1939 at age 65, one year 
before he was to be made Prime Minister of England. 
The course of world history may well have been far 
different indeed. And what if Albert Schweitzer, the 
medical-missionary, just turned 90 and still operating his 
native hospital on the Ogowe River in French Equatorial 
Africa, had been recalled to his native Alsace a genera- 
tion ago because he was too old to go on at 65? 

Marcus Tillius Cicero, in the ages before Christ, even 
then put the older worker and his relationship to the 
community of man in proper perspective when he wrote: 
"Intelligence, and reflection, and judgment, reside in old 
men, and if there had been none of them, no states could 
exist at all." 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



GENERAL OFFICERS OF: 



GENERAL OFFICE: 



THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 101 Constitution Ave n.w 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Finlay C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave.. N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



second general vice president 
William Sidell 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 " 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Terzick 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W.. 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St.. New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 

Third District, Harry Schwarzer 
16678 State Road, North Royalton, Ohio 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16, Minn. 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 10, Mo. 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 

1126 American Bank Bldg., 

621 S. W. Morrison St., Portland 5, Ore 

Eighth District, Patrick Hogan 
8564 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent, Toronto 7, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 



M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 



NAME 



Local # 



OLD ADDRESS 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



City 



NEW ADDRESS 



Zone 



State 



.Local # 



City 



State 



Zip Code Number 



PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

BE SURE TO WRITE IN YOUR LOCAL UNION NUMBER 



WE NEED YOUR 

LOCAL UNION 

NUMBER 

Because we are chang- 
ing over our mail list to 
our new computer, it is 
impossible for us to add, 
subtract, or change an 
address if we do not have 
your Local Union num- 
ber. Therefore, if you 
want your name added to 
the mail list of the jour- 
nal, or if you want it 
taken off, or if you want 
your address changed, 
please include your Local 
Union No. in your re- 
quest. Thank you for 
your cooperation. 

PETER TERZICK 





What do 
"torture- 
tested" 
levels 

mean 
to you? 



You're 
surer. 




THE T<»L BOX OF THE WORLD 




Torture testing is a must ... to assure 
positive accuracy and long service 
life of levels. Stanley levels are 
tested in extremely hot and cold 
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Here's why Stanley levels are able 
to pass these rigid tests: (1) A dur- 
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accuracy in. (2) A close-tolerance 
milling operation makes the top and 
bottom and both ends perfectly par- 
allel for unerring accuracy. (3) 
Solid-set vials on aluminum level 
No. 313 are protected by shock- 
padded glass covers. Here are other 
quality Stanley levels every carpen- 
ter needs : 



Lightweight mason's level 
No. 255A (right) made 
from extra-tough mag- 
nesium I-beam, with 
easy-to-replace vials 
protected by heavy win- 
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easy handling. In 
lengths of 24", 28", 30" 
and 48" with 6 vials 
and 72" and 78" with 
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Aluminum torpedo level 
No. 264 (above) is light- 
weight, pocket-sized, 
with 3 solid-set Cat's 
Eye vials — plumb, level 
and 45° mitre. Bottom 
grooved for use on 
shafts, pipes, etc. Nine 
inches long. 



Do you know how to use a Steel 
Square that solves so many problems 
of laying out work? Write for our 
free book No. 33 on how to use the 
Stanley. Rafter Square. Stanley 
Tools, Division of The Stanley 
Works, New Britain, Connecticut. 
In Canada: Hamilton, Ontario. 



Official Publication of the 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 



FOUNDED 1881 



JUNE, 1965 




THE 



<3£\l£LP 




VOLUME LXXXV 



NO. 6 



JUNE, 1965 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Acting Editor 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Action Begins on 14(b) 2 

Pleasure Boat Building the Union Way 4 

The Journeyman of Tomorrow 8 

Report on BCTD Legislative Conference TO 

You Can Help "Books for Appalachia" 13 

Millwright Skills Serve the Space Age 14 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 12 

Editorials 18 

Canadian Report 19 

Home Study Course 20 

Plane Gossip 22 

Local Union News 23 

In Memoriam 35 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 36 

Lakeland News 38 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N. E., Washington, D. C. 20018. by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20c in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

On the bays, rivers and lakes of 
the United States and Canada, recrea- 
tional boats ranging in size from mod- 
est little "putt-putts" of about 12 feet, 
up to giants of 50 feet and longer, are 
part of the growing trend toward "life 
on the water". 

Boating is bringing a large volume 
of employment to members of our 
Brotherhood in building, maintaining 
and repairing the thousands of pleas- 
ure boats. 

When the article beginning on Page 
4 was undertaken. The Carpenter's 
photographer went to the big Chris 
Craft Corporation's boat factory at 
Salisbury, Maryland, located on the 
famed "Eastern Shore." where fine 
boat-building has been a proud tradi- 
tion for over 200 years. Members of 
L. U. 2811 employed there have the 
same pride of workmanship as their 
forebears. 

The article beginning on Page 4 
praises the use of wood, the tradi- 
tional material, for boat-building. Yet 
our shipwright members also work 
with other excellent materials in many 
locations. The Carpenter hopes to 
cover their activities in future issues. 

We wish to acknowledge the 
courtesy of the Chris Craft Corp. in 
furnishing the marine scene on the 
cover which features a "Brotherhood- 
built" 1965 35-foot Chris Craft "Sea 
Hawk." 






Action Begins 
On Section 14(b) 



'ki • i • ' rrrn • ' , -r 



WE MUST ASSUME THE NOW OR NEVER' ATTITUDE 



THE MOST IMPORTANT 

. . . action you can take this month 
to protect your union wages and 
working conditions is to write your 
Congressman and tell him that you 
want Section 14(b) of the Taft- 
Hartley Law repealed. You want 
favorable action on HR 77, the bill 
now pending to accomplish that 
purpose. Put it in your own words 
and send it post haste to your own 
home-district Congressman, c/o 
House Office Bldg., Washington, 
D.C. 20025. Urge your wife, rela- 
tives and neighbors to write too. 
Put it in your own handwriting. It's 
time well spent! 



TN a special message to the Con- 
-*- gress. May 18, 1965, President 
Lyndon Johnson urged the repeal of 
Section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley 
Act "with such other technical 
changes as are made necessary by 
this action." 

This expected request by the Pres- 
ident was a follow-up to his State 
of the Union Message of January 4, 
1965, when he said: ". . . as pledged 
in our 1960 and 1964 Democratic 
platforms, I will propose to Congress 
changes in the Taft-Hartley Act 
including Section 14(b). I will do 
so hoping to reduce conflicts that 
for several years have divided Amer- 
icans in various states of our Union." 

With this latest appeal of the 
President on May 18th, we must 
assume the "now or never" attitude. 
Every union member should write 
to his Congressmen and fight to 



repeal this law which is designed to 
destroy unions and free collective 
bargaining. 

While the Taft-Hartley Law, 
passed by Congress in 1947, per- 
mits various restricted forms of un- 
ion security, Section 14(b) of that 
law permits state "right-to-work" 
laws to outlaw these same forms of 
union security. This is inconsistent 
and contrary to a basic principle of 
our American legal system, the su- 
premacy of Federal law. Further- 
more, Section 14(b) does not allow 
states to permit such forms of union 
security as the union shop. 

In his most recent message to 
Congress, President Johnson also 
urged the amendment of the Fair 
Labor Standards Act to extend its 
protection to an additional AVi 
million workers; and to restrict ex- 
cessive overtime work through the 
payment of double time. Concern- 
ing the unemployment insurance 
program, the President wants it 
strengthened to provide a permanent 
program of Federally extended bene- 
fits for long-term unemployed with 
substantial work histories. 

As this issue of The Carpenter 
goes to press, the House Labor and 
Education Committee plans to hold 
hearings on HR 77, the bill to 
repeal 14(b), almost immediately. 

The forces opposed to strong 
unions — the forces behind these so- 
called "right to work" laws — are 
mounting a full-scale campaign 
against repeal of 14(b). We have 
to be able to answer their propa- 
ganda with facts. As long as 14(b) 



repeal is before Congress, we will try 
to provide those facts. Attached are 
some questions about "right-to- 
work" laws that frequently come up, 
and the answers to them. (They were 
supplied to us by the Women's 
Activities Division of COPE.) 

We urge you to spread this infor- 
mation throughout your community 
and to make 14(b) repeal your 
Number One political objective in 
the months ahead. 

Questions and Answers 
on Section 14(b) Repeal 

Q. How is it that unions want to 
force workers to belong and pay 
dues when no other organization 
compels membership? 

A. Unions, unlike church organi- 
zations or service clubs, are in the 
special position of being required by 
law to provide service to all persons 
in a bargaining unit. Such services 
cost money and the costs should be 
shared fairly by all those benefited 
by them. A church, for instance, 
does not have to provide its facili- 
ties to a person who does not join. 
An arbitration case can cost a local 
union $1,000 or more to restore a 
fired worker to his job. It is simply 
not fair for one worker to get the 
benefit of such help without paying 
his share of the cost. 

Q. Why shouldn't each state have 
the right to decide on its own 
whether or not the union shop will 
be permitted? 

A. First of all the Constitution 
of the United States empowers Con- 
gress to regulate commerce (and 



THE CARPENTER 



labor relations is part of commerce) 
between the states uniformly. Sec- 
ondly Congress has long recognized 
that uniform standards of labor leg- 
islation must apply in all states if 
some workers aren't to be treated 
unfairly. This very point was spelled 
out both in the original Wagner 
Act, and when Taft-Hartley itself 
amended the Wagner Act, it was 
spelled out again. Finally, Section 
14(b) permits states to make the 
law more restrictive, but not less 
restrictive — the only such provision 
in all Federal law. 

Q. Don't working people them- 
selves want Section 14(b) to protect 
them from having to join a union? 

A. Emphatically, no! When the 
original Taft-Hartley Act was passed 
in 1947, it contained a provision 
requiring a vote of workers to ap- 
prove the union shop before it could 
become part of a contract. In 46,1 19 
elections conducted under that pro- 
vision, workers voted for the union 
shop in 44,795 of them— 97.1%. 
All told some 5,500,000 individual 
votes were cast, and 91% of them 
were cast in favor of the union shop. 

Q. Don't the "Right-to-Work" 
laws passed under Section 14(b) by 
state legislatures bring more industry 
and more jobs to states that have 
such laws? 

A. No. In every survey of the 
major reasons why plants locate in a 
state, anti-labor laws rank at the bot- 
tom of the list of reasons for new 
plant location. Topping the list are 
resources, transportation and close- 
ness to major markets. 

Q. Doesn't compulsory union 
membership force a member to pay, 
through his dues, for some things 
he doesn't believe in? 

A. Of course not. Every intelli- 
gent worker believes in job security, 
better wages, and working condi- 
tions — offered by union contracts. 
Taxes force some people to pay for 
some government policies they don't 
believe in. But union decisions, like 
governmental decisions, are arrived 
at by majority vote. It the ma- 
jority decides that a particular pro- 
gram is beneficial, then the union 
must carry it out if it is to be truly 
democratic. 



'Right -to -Work' Forces 
Gear Up to Block Repeal 

All the forces that have tried to foist so-called "right to work" laws on 
American workers for years— the right-wingers, NAM, Chamber of Commerce 
and the National Right to Work Committee— are cranked up for an all-out 
drive to prevent repeal of Section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act. 

The National Association of Manufacturers has distributed to business leaders 
throughout the country a complete kit of pro-i4(b) material to try to drum up 
public opposition to repeal. 

The National Right to Work Committee has registered as a lobby in the 
national Congress. One of its lobbyists is Edward Nellor who served on 
Barry Goldwater's press staff in the 1964 presidential campaign, and who once 
worked on the staff of right wing broadcaster Fulton Lewis Jr. The obvious 
purpose of its lobbying will be to prevent 14(b) repeal. 

From the journals and printing presses of the right wing extremists, there is a 
flow of propaganda, likening repeal of 14(b) to a national disaster. 

"Human Events," one of the major right wing publications, is filling its pages 
with anti-repeal material. And the John Birch Society already has urged its 
members to work against 14(b) repeal. 

All of the elements backing the open shop and fighting 14(b) repeal are 
urging their followers to write to congressmen and senators, newspapers and 
opinion-makers expressing their views. How about you? Have you taken up 
your pen for repeal of 14(b)? 



'LET'S YOU AND HIM FIGHT' 




JUNE, 1965 



Union boat builders carry on 

age-old skills of the craft 

in booming small-boat industry 



.'•'**V 




"."""- 






Pleasure Boat Building . . . the 




- .... 




J. R. Pocklington, manager of Salisbury 
plant of Chris Craft Corp., rear, was 
once president of Federal Labor Union 
20783, Detroit. With Preston Morris he 
checks chocks on a 38-foot Corinthian 
being shipped to Boston. 



XT/HEN early man observed that a 
W log would float, it was not long 
before he hollowed one out and 
climbed aboard that first and most 
crude of all boats. The beginning arts 
of primitive man were quite often 
highly developed with regard to boat- 
building. Even today the Indian birch- 
bark canoe remains a thing of grace 
and beauty. 

Through the ages and in each cul- 
ture, boatbuilders have handed their 
acquired knowledge and skills down 
from father to son. 

Boatbuilding has been a skill of 
many members of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America since the establishment of the 
union. Today, union shipwrights are 
employed in all boat-building centers 
of North America. 



Boatbuilding for the recreational 
trade in the United States is increas- 
ingly becoming "big business". Bet- 
ter pay and shorter hours, lengthened 
vacations and better access roads to 
open water and rivers have made the 
diversion of boating and boat-based 
water recreations available to more 
people and has resulted in virtually 
a mass market for small boats. En- 
gineers have developed simple methods 
of marine conversion for mass-pro- 
duced automobile engines, thus sub- 
stantially lowering the cost of marine 
power plants. 

According to the Outdoor Boating 
Club of America, the use of small 
outboard boats has more than doubled 
in the past 13 years. In 1950, 131,000 
outboard-type boats were sold. In 
1963, there were 257,000. The dollar 




After the engine is positioned, all con- 
nections must be made. Here William 
Moore, left, and William Hancock, mem- 
bers of Local 2811, deftly pull everything 
together. 



President of L.U. 2811 is William Davis, 
here operating a hot press of Chris Craft 
design which joins sheets of marine ply- 
wood together. The unit has 370 members. 



Sharp tools make for safety and good 
work, so Claude Nichols, vice president of 
Local 2811, puts new edge on shaper 
head. The plant operates as a union shop. 




THE CARPENTER 



The cabin deck of this Chris Craft 

cruiser nearing completion at 

the Salisbury, Maryland, plant where 

L.U. 2811 members are employed, 

is littered with items of trim which are 

being installed by M. W. I learn 

and V. C. Elliott. 



Vr 



Inion Way 




value of the motors sold for use on 
the nation's outboards zoomed from 
$63 million in 1950 to a high of $253 
million in 1959 and dropped to $167 
million in 1963. 

The U.S. Coast Guard maintains 
totals of boat registrations in the 50 
states and the District of Columbia. 
By law, all motor boats according to 
varying horsepower requirements of 
the states (and sailboats generally 
from 25 feet), up to 65 feet, must 
carry a registry number issued by the 
state in whose waters they are princi- 
pally used. Above 65 feet they are 
considered "vessels" rather than 
"boats". The 1964 boat total, accord- 
ing to Coast Guard records, was 
3,568,100. The vast majority of these 
were relatively small boats. 



Operating with glaring battery of lights 
behind him, Frank Ross, chief shop stew- 
ard, puts final coat of glossy white paint 
on bow of cruiser nearing completion. 



With this vast market at his dis- 
posal, modern techniques have as- 
sisted the wooden boat builder in his 
efforts to produce an ever more ac- 
ceptable and economical small boat. 
Large craft have gone to stronger 
steel (who could visualize a wooden 
Queen Mary?) but the strength of 
seagoing wood has been significantly 
increased by today's remanufacturing 
processes. Wood which has been 
laminated into plys and cemented with 
waterproof adhesives has a strength 
which would have been both the joy 
and envy of those early craftsmen who 
turned out the fleet Yankee Clippers 
on the shores of Chesapeake Bay. 

Many boats of the past were built 
as open shells, into which the com- 
partmented cabins and interior struc- 
tures were largely simply deposited. 



L.U. 2811 treasurer, Murray Shores, left, 
a clerk in engine office, checks specifica- 
tions with Tommy Northam, supervisor, 
formerly financial secretary of local union. 





**"*? 




Kirby Evans assembles instrument panels 
to be positioned in cruisers. Every bit of 
wood in Chris Crafts is painted both 
sides, even if hidden or upholstered. 



JUNE, 1965 




Al left: A cabin superstructure 
approaches completion. Robert Hcarn, 
far left, inserts bungs over screws. 
Thomas Johnson on roof installs horn. 
Dale War liaudsands a corner post 
and Alton Hanks in foreground, applies 
white tiller. Cabin will go on a 
35-foot "Constellation." 

Below: The great public interest in 
recreational boating is evident in this 
long shot of one section of the Salisbury 
plant. Here cruisers arc having 
planking applied over the "skeletons" 
of keels and ribs. Man in foreground 
is using power sandcr to smooth a hull. 



Today every bulkhead and bit of 
cabinetry serves to strengthen and 
stiffen the wooden boat without add- 
ing unnecessarily to its weight. 

The boat builders have also found 
that there is a practical limit to the 
size of glass fiber hulls. While a few 
extra-large hulls (above 35 feet) have 
been molded, most boat builders pre- 
fer to hold them to 30 feet and, 
preferably, smaller. 



There was a time when no master 
of a small craft would think of trust- 
ing a hull unless it was laid up with 
solid planking at least an inch and 
an eighth thick. The old displace- 
ment hull shape with a generous 
amount of freeboard at the bow to 
hold against crashing head-on seas had 
no substitute. 

Today many a 35-footer (or even 
larger) goes blithely and safely cruis- 




Nelson Bragg, recording secretary of Lo- 
cal 2811, feeds seat backs into sander. 



One of five women members of the local, 
Eunice James, stitches cabin draperies. 



ing into churning offshore waters with 
only a scant five-eighths of an inch 
of marine plywood hull, scientifically- 
designed, between the people inside 
and the water outside. 

One of the primary reasons boat- 
men continue to prefer wood in their 
small craft, both motorboats and sail- 
ers, is that only wood has real marine 
beauty. Wood takes a fine finish easily. 
With staining and varnishing, wood 
has a warmth which no synthetic 
material can completely recreate. Im- 
proved plastic-based varnishes have 
made it possible to maintain boats 
"in Bristol fashion" (first-class condi- 
tion) with far less application of the 
varnish brush than was possible in 
years past. A boat almost has to have 
a certain minimum amount of bright 
work (natural wood trim) in order to 
have buyer-appeal, sellers agree. Even 
glass fiber boats and those made of 
various metals generally have natural 
wood trim added for beauty's sake. 

The natural strength of wood, which 
never diminishes after years of flex- 
ing in a boat, makes it highly desir- 
able as a boatbuilding material. Oak 
is generally used as the material for 
keels and other hull framing members, 
often being steam-bent into shape. 



THE CARPENTER 




Anti-fouling paint is applied to finished 
hulls by Guilford Abbott, James Murphy. 



At right: A group of the skilled crafts- 
men in the Chris Craft plant try their 
skills at indoor shuffleboard during lunch 
period. They made board themselves. 





u^^s0t«C 



Mahogany is widely-used for its 
strength in framing and planking and 
because of its beauty when used for 
interior panels and exterior members. 
There are many other sturdy woods 
popularly used in boat construction 
such as spruce, teak, cedar, pine, fir 
and cypress. 

Wooden boats, properly maintained, 
have a life expectancy which has be- 
come positively indefinite. In the olden 
days, a well-built boat could reason- 
ably expect a lifetime of from 20 to 
30 years. Now, with modern chemi- 
cal techniques for filling the pores of 
wood and chemically safeguarding it 
against the onslaughts of rot and natu- 
ral deterioration, the life of a wooden 
boat is something subject only to con- 
jecture; certainly well over 30 years 
with even ordinary care. 

The metallic boat and the glass 
fiber boat came about in answer to 
problems of wooden boat maintenance, 
most of which problems have now 
been greatly diminished. Some small 
boat builders of repute are continuing 
to construct their craft of wood, but 
cover the completed hulls with a thin 
veneer of glass fiber. Decks and other 
exposed upper surfaces, formerly 
varnished or painted, are currently 



being covered with cemented-down 
vinyl and other similar materials 
which will take heavy foot traffic 
without surface damage. Boat build- 






m 



J-im 




Power plant of each craft is tested after 
it is completed. Hoses provide supply of 
water to engines. Fred Cullen runs tests. 

ers are beginning to favor a plywood 
with an overlay called "medium den- 
sity" on its exposed surfaces. This is 
an exterior grade plywood panel with 
a cellulose fibre surface bonded to its 



face with phenolic resin. Marine 
enamels are then used over the "medi- 
um density" and the service life of 
the enamel is thereby greatly extended. 
Sheet vinyl is being laminated to ply- 
wood in some boat yards and the next 
logical step is the use of factory-fin- 
( 'on tin i led on Page 21 



FLOATING A BOAT 

The boom year for U, S. boat-buying 
was 1959. It was about this time when 
the nation's bankers "discovered" boat- 
ing. Several years previously, one had 
to have cash in order to buy any kind 
of a boat. Then the finance companies 
were tempted to take a chance on 
boats. The interest charges were con- 
siderable. 

Then the banks discovered that the 
finance companies were coming to them, 
borrowing money at a relatively low 
rate of interest, financing boats at a 
higher interest rate, and pocketing the 
difference. Many bankers then broke 
with hidebound tradition, and more 
have done so in the ensuing years. 
Today many boats, properly insured 
and with a significant down payment, 
are being financed for periods up to 
seven years. 



JUNE, 1965 



The Journeyman of Tomorrow 

CAREER CRAFTSMAN 



I 1 IS SOMETIMES SAID of the 
foreign language newspaper that every 
time they prim a death notice, they 
lose a subscriber. 

Is The Carpenter, perhaps, simi- 
larly chronicling the gradual demise 
of the Brotherhood of Carpenters as 
an aggregation of loyal, union-minded 
members every time it prints a photo 
or news report of a 25-year pin cere- 
mony or an "old-timers night"? 

Who is going to take the places of 
these stalwart old-time members when 
they leave the craft? What kind of 
union members will their successors 
be? 

These are thoughts which have un- 
doubtedly occurred to many in the 
Brotherhood, and those who have re- 
garded the future of the Brotherhood 
and of trade unionism in general with 
some foreboding may be interested in 
a significant experiment in trade union 
education which has just rounded out 
its first year of operation in the San 
Francisco Bay Area. 

In that time, 540 Carpenter appren- 
tices have attended, and 460 have 
graduated from, special trade union 
education classes held two hours a 
night, once a week for 10 weeks, 
covering a variety of subjects which 
include general labor history; the his- 
tory and structure of the Brotherhood; 
union and negotiated benefits, by-laws 
and working rules; jurisdiction; auto- 
mation; political education and labor 
economics. 

The trade union classes are separate 
from the regular trade classes, and 
where there is a schedule conflict, the 
apprentices are excused from regular 
classes to attend them. 

This precedent-setting trade union 
education program was inaugurated in 
March 1964 by the Bay Counties Dis- 
trict Council of Carpenters, whose 
jurisdiction embraces San Francisco 
and adjoining Alameda, San Mateo 
and Marin counties. 

Spark-plug for the venture was 
District Council Executive Secretary 
C. R. Bartalini. who had come to 
realize over a period of time that, as 
he puts it, "we're losing over 100 
members a month due to death or re- 
tirement. These are the solid old- 
timers who built our union and have 
been its backbone. Their places are 



CERTIFICATE 

n witness that ■'""" "° c 



has attended 

ami satisfactorily completed the Trade Union Education Classes 
for Apprentices of the Bay Counties District Council of Car- 
penters for the term ending fiu-uary ib, id<.s . 

ratemal congratulations, and welcome to the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners of America. 






Executive Secretary-Treasurer 



President 



At end of course. Bay Area graduates receive completion certificate. 



being taken by newcomers who accept 
the fine wages and conditions we enjoy 
today without knowing what we had 
to go through to win them. Many of 
them see the union only as something 
they have to pay dues to in order to 
work; some are actually hostile." 

Under Bartalini's leadership the Dis- 
trict Council delegates voted to fi- 
nance a Research & Education De- 
partment and entrusted its operation 
to Harold Rossman, a veteran trade 
unionist with more than a quarter- 
century of experience in trade union 
journalism, education and research. 

It was decided to concentrate ini- 
tially on incoming apprentices. The 
District Council voted that all new 
apprentices must attend the trade 
union education classes and that none 
could be initiated without completing 
the course. 

The Curriculum 

Decisions on the curriculum and 
length of the course came next. A 
quick survey disclosed that there was 
no ready-made pattern to follow. In 
staff discussions, some 23 potential 
study areas were mapped, but it was 
decided arbitrarily to limit the classes 
to 10 weeks, and a selection of topics 
was made to comprise a curriculum 
for a course of that length. 

Classes were scheduled four nights 
a week, Monday through Thursday. 
7 to 9 p.m., in the four counties of 
the District Council's jurisdiction. 
Consideration was given to holding 



the classes in public school buildings, 
but it was decided that the trade union 
education program, as distinct from 
the regular trade classes, would more 
fittingly be conducted in centrally lo- 
cated union halls in each county. 

Certain Problems 

In preparation for the classes, and 
even more clearly after they had 
started, certain problems became 
evident: 

First, there were no text book or 
study outlines available that would be 
exactly suitable for young trade union- 
ists in this craft and in this area; and 
if there were, there would still be the 
problem of assigning home reading to 
students who are tired after a day's 
work, who have regular craft classes 
on one or two other nights of the 
week and who are not great readers to 
begin with. 

This seemed to dictate that instruc- 
tion should be largely by the lecture 
and discussion methods, with little or 
no written material. 

Second, it was obvious that the 
young tradesmen, many of them over 
20, married and fathers of families, 
would, at least at the start, resent hav- 
ing to give up a free evening to "go 
back to school." 

That meant that the District Council 
would have to be firm about compel- 
ling attendance, but at the same time, 
that the classes must be made inter- 
esting, if a positive relationship with 
the students were to be achieved and 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



if the instruction were to result in 
better understanding and an improved 
image of the Union. 

To help increase interest, suitable 
films were chosen to go with seven of 
the 10 general topics, and guest lec- 
turers were used whenever possible, 
such as having officials of the District 
Council discuss subjects like the struc- 
ture and functions of the union and 
trustees of the fringe benefit funds talk 
about the fringes. 

Topical Interests 

As the course progressed, certain 
difference in response to the topics 
were observed. It was easy to get a 
discussion going on topics like the 
union and fringe benefits, working 
rules and jurisdiction, which touched 
the students closely and were within 
the range of their experience. Ob- 
viously, there was less two-way ex- 
change in the classes covering past 
history of the Carpenters and labor 
generally. 

Yet it was necessary for a rounded 
treatment that the apprentices should 
know something about labor's early 
struggle, about the virtual destruction 
of the building unions and conditions 
in the Bay Area during the American 
Plan open shop period and the Great 
Depression of the '30's, and so on. 

One device to make the historical 
material more acceptable and mean- 
ingful — to keep it from being just 
"dead history" — was to draw parallels, 
whenever possible, with recent and 
current events. Thus, the historic 
Pullman Strike of the 1890's is com- 
pared with the bitter Florida & East 
Coast Railroad strike-lockout which 
has dragged out for the past two years 
with much of the old high-handedness, 
violence and rancor. Yesterday's open 
shop drives are linked with today's 
so-called "right-to-work" drives. Cur- 
rent news clippings reporting picket- 
line violence, use of injunctions, labor 
spies and deputized strikebreakers are 
cited. 

The main effort is to convey central 
concepts, rather than a mass of detail, 




GRADUATION NIGHT: A class of San Francisco apprentices proudly show 
their certificates at the conclusion of one of the sequences of the San Francisco 
Bay Area Carpenters' special trade union education classes. 




as when side-by-side chronologies of 
the major labor struggles and of 
America's business cycles are used to 
illustrate how the employers' heaviest 
attacks on unionism coincided with 
the depression periods when there 
were millions of unemployed, desper- 
ate workers among whom they could 
hope to recruit scabs. 

Labor's Social Gains 

Discussions of labor's early experi- 
ments in political unionism and Uto- 
pian schemes show how these were 
a consequence of its frustrations and 
defeats on the economic front; yet 
how they nevertheless brought such 
permanent social gains for all Ameri- 
cans as free public schools, mechanics' 
lien laws, direct voting in elections, 
control of child labor and the like. 

The course emphasizes the positive 
as well as the negative. There is full 
acknowledgment of today's wider ac- 
ceptance of unions and collective bar- 
gaining — but the reminder also that 
there are powerful, unreconstructed 
employer interests who still plot to 
weaken or destroy organized labor, 
and that this still can happen any time 



NOW HE KNOWS SOME- 
THING ABOUT THE UN- 
ION. Shown here receiving his 
certificate of completion from 
the Trade Union Education 
program of the Bay Counties 
District Council of Carpenters 
is apprentice Louis J. Amaral 
of Local Union 1622. Left to 
right: Education and Research 
Director Harold Rossman; Exe- 
cutive Secretary-Treasurer C. R. 
Bartalini; Amaral, and Presi- 
dent Al Figone. 



the unions become too complacent and 
lose their readiness and ability to fight. 
While the historical overview is im- 
portant, the largest part of the course 
deals with present and future pro- 
grams and problems of the labor 
movement and of our craft, and seeks 
to inform the member about his own 
union and its structure, functions and 
benefits. 

Implanting Ideas 

Always kept in view is the realiza- 
tion that the program is not trying to 
turn out labor scholars, but rather to 
implant some idea of the long, hard 
struggles to win today's conditions; to 
impart some understanding of labor's 
basic goals, methods and philosophy; 
to build esteem and loyalty for our 
union; to dispel some of the commonly- 
held false notions about unions in gen- 
eral and the Brotherhood in particular. 

Lesson outlines are considered to be 
guides, but not straitjackets. The 
important thing is to present ideas and 
get reactions. When a class takes the 
bit in its teeth and starts an energetic 
discussion on some point, the discus- 
sion is allowed to run, even if it means 
that part of the planned lesson has to 
be condensed or eliminated. 

The result has been a course with 
little or no assigned reading, no tests 
and considerable informality in its 
procedure. 

At the final session there is a "grad- 
uation" of sorts — a simple ceremony 
of presenting attractive printed certifi- 
cates or "diplomas" to those whose 
attendance and participation has been 
satisfactory. 

Continued on page 32 



JUNE, 1965 




4,200 Delegates Attend 
Building Trades Department 
Legislative Conference; 
President Johnson Pays 
Surprise "Thank You' k Visit 



President Johnson addressing Conference delegates. 



SECTION 14(B) HOLDS TOP PRIORITY ON 1965 LABOR LEGISLATIVE AGENDA 



FIRST THINGS FIRST 

How did President Johnson's surprise 
visit to the Tenth National Legislative 
Conference of the Building and Con- 
struction Trades Department come 
about? 

It was touched off by a spontaneous 
series of events. First was the impas- 
sioned plea by AFL-CIO President 
George Meany tor solid labor support 
of the President's policy in Viet Nam 
and the Dominican Republic. The re- 
sponse of the 4,200 delegates was so 
enthusiastic, that Department President 
Neil Haggerty announced he would im- 
mediately notify President Johnson of 
their "100 percent support." 

What was the effect on President 
Johnson? Let the chief executive de- 
scribe it himself: 

"I knew you were meeting today and 
I wanted very much to come over and 
drop in and give you a word of wel- 
come and say 'howdy' and 'thank you.' 

"But when I looked at my schedule 
and saw the cables being brought to 
my desk, I didn't see how in the world 
I could make it. Then I got a telegram. 

"It wasn't about repealing Section 
14-b, although I know that is important 
to you and it is important to me. 

"It wasn't about the various legisla- 
tive proposals in which you are inter- 
ested, important as they are. But it 
was about the most vital issues in this 
country and for that matter in the whole 
world — peoce and freedom. 

"So I have stolen these few minutes 
to come over here fust to say thank 
you. * * * Thank you for putting first 
things first, for being leaders of the 
free America today, for being even 
before that the leaders of America 
herself." 



AN all-time record turnout of more 
than 4,200 delegates to the tenth 
and most successful National Legis- 
lative Conference of the AFL-CIO 
Building and Construction Trades De- 
partment put the freedom of their 
country and its allies at the head of 
labor's "must" list. 

As a direct result, President Lyndon 
B. Johnson, on a day of international 
crises, paid a surprise "thank you" 
visit to the session at the new Wash- 
ington Hilton Hotel. 

In a 40-minute major address that 
was covered in great detail by the 
television and radio networks and the 
world press, the chief executive em- 
phasized that repeal of Section 14-b 
of the Taft-Hartley Act, which en- 
courages anti-union "right-to-work" 
laws in the states, was "important to 
you and it is important to me." 



Moreover, as did top congressional 
leaders of both parties, Johnson clear- 
ly indicated his backing of other key 
measures sought by organized labor, 
including passage of a situs picketing 
bill, a higher minimum wage and 
Medicare. 

While the representatives of 3.5- 
million building tradesmen sat in rapt 
attention, Johnson launched a highly 
significant discussion of his domestic 
and foreign policies. 

AFL-CIO President George Meany 
earlier endorsed Johnson's strong ac- 
tion in both the Dominican Republic 
and Viet Nam, pointing out that no 
one ever can successfully defend free- 
dom by appeasing a dictator, as ex- 
perience with Hitler, Mussolini and 
Stalin had proved. He expressed the 
hope that every patriotic American 
worker would back the president in 




Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz admires a delegate's briefcase, as members 
of his escort committee prepare to go with him into the meeting hall. From 
left, IBEW Secretary Joseph Keenan, Secretary Wirtz, William McSorley, Jr., 
of the Building Trades Department, Carpenters' General Secretary R. E. Liv- 
ingston, and Operating Engineers' Vice President J. C. Turner. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



foreign affairs without reservation. 

Haggerty, agreeing with Meany and 
others that the outlook for repeal of 
14-b now was highly favorable, 
stressed that the situs picketing bill 
was sorely needed. He explained this 
was due to a 1951 U.S. Supreme 
Court decision which restricted picket- 
ing at a construction job site. Three 
administrations. Republican and Dem- 
ocratic alike, have recognized these 
restrictions as unfair. 

Concord now having been achieved- 
with industrial unions on the details 
of a job-site picketing bill, Haggerty 
stated there is no reason for Congress 
to wait any longer to enact this leg- 
islation. 

He also called for a higher mini- 
mum wage, broader coverage under 
the Fair Labor Standards Act, over- 
time improvements, shorter work- 
week and correction without com- 
promise of the denial of the Negroes' 
right to vote. 

The United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners was ably repre- 
sented at the conference by approxi- 
mately 600 delegates from all over 
the nation. They assembled at their 
own special luncheon on the second 
day of the conference. 

President Johnson gave delegates to 
the Conference a firm pledge. He 
promised that no world problems, 
critical as they are, would be allowed 
to keep the United States from meet- 
ing the needs and demands of its own 
people. 

Neither trouble abroad nor any 
group here would ever stand in the 
way, Johnson averred, as "we build 
a Great Society where no man or 
woman is the victim of fear or pov- 
erty or hatred, where every man and 
woman has a chance of fulfillment, 
for prosperity and for hope." 

Those who thought he would put 
off until another day the anti-poverty 
program, the Appalachia program, the 
medical care program and other mat- 
ters of deep concern to organized 
labor were "just talking through their 
hats," Johnson said, "because we are 
not going to put anything off." 

President Johnson's dramatic per- 
sonal appearance climaxed the open- 
ing day of a four-day legislative con- 
ference that demonstrated the tremen- 
dous prestige and influence of the 
Building and Construction Trades 
Department. 

In the galaxy of national leaders 
who addressed the conference were 
Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, 
Speaker of the House John W. Mc- 
Cormack, House Republican Minor- 
ity Leader Gerald R. Ford, Jr. and 



Senator Pat McNa- 
mara of Michigan, 
sponsor of a 14(b) 
repeal bill, is es- 
corted into the hall 
by L. M. Weir of 
the Detroit Dis- 
trict Council, left, 
First Vice Presi- 
dent Finlay Allan, 
right, and other 
members of an es- 
cort committee. 



General President 
M. A. Hutcheson 
extends a hand of 
welcome to Cali- 
fornia Senator 
Thomas Kiichel. as 
he comes to the 
speakers' platform. 



Wilbur D. Mills, D.-Ark., Chairman 
of the House Ways and Means 
Committee. 

From the Senate came Pat Mc- 
Namara, D.-Mich.; Jacob K. Javits, 
R.-N. Y.; Lee Metcalf, D.-Mont.; 
Thomas H. Kuchel, R. -Calif.; and 
Jennings Randolph, D.-W. Va., plus 
Congressman Frank Thompson, Jr., 
D.-N. J., sponsor of legislation that 
would knock out right-to-work laws 
in 19 states. 

There were Secretary of Labor W. 
Willard Wirtz, Undersecretary of La- 
bor John F. Henning and Solicitor of 
Labor Charles Donahue. 

In addition to Presidents Meany 
and Haggerty, labor speakers in- 
cluded BCTD Secretary-Treasurer 
Frank Bonadio, General Counsel 
Louis Sherman and Andrew J. Bie- 
miller, Director of Legislation for the 
AFL-CIO. 

Johnson, Vice President Humphrey 
and Secretary Wirtz mentioned that 
1.6-million more Americans were 
working today than a year ago, that 
the unemployment rate was the low- 
est in nearly eight years and the eco- 




nomic situation looked rosy, with a 
record of 51 consecutive months of 
uninterrupted expansion without in- 
flation. Yet, said Wirtz, the presi- 
dent was more conscious of the people 
still not working than other consid- 
erations. 

Of particular interest to the dele- 
gates as well as the nation was an 
observation by Vice President Hum- 
phrey, who is chairman of the presi- 
dent's Committee on Equal Employ- 
ment Opportunity. 

"I am charged with the responsi- 
bility of seeing that equal hiring poli- 
cies are observed on all federally-as- 
sisted construction projects," he said. 

"And I say to you today, directly 
and indirectly, that the general presi- 
dents of your international unions 
have been most co-operative. They 
have pledged to me their full co-op- 
eration of equal opportunity within 
the building and construction trades. 

"And I have pledged to them that 
the federal government has no in- 
tention of seeking to abolish estab- 
lished union hiring procedures which 
Continued on page 17 



JUNE, 1965 



11 



r ,i * 




Washington ROUNDUP 




OUR ARTICLE ON H.R. 6363, the Congressional bill designed to restore to building 
trades unions the right to picket an unfair construction site (which we published 
in the April issue of the CARPENTER) was inserted in the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD by 
Congressman James G. O'Hara of Michigan. The article was noteworthy in that it 
gave an historical background and explanation for the current legislative action. 

DESALINATION PROGRAM-The AFL-CIO believes that if the United States is to make a 
decisive breakthrough in the technology of desalting sea water, it must spend more 
money than it is now doing. While approving legislation for a five-year extension 
of the government's water desalination program, APL-CIO Legislative Director 
Andrew J. Biemiller has expressed doubt that even the proposed $200,000 increase 
in appropriations will be adequate to speed up the program to the point where 
desalted water can be made competitive with other water sources. In a letter to 
Senator Henry M. Jackson, Washington Democrat and Chairman of the Senate Interior 
Committee, Biemiller suggested that the Secretary of the Interior be asked to 
formulate an accelerated desalination program. 

AFL-CIO PRESIDENT George Meany has sent a telegram to the White House praising 
President Johnson's stand on Vietnam. "Your clear, concise statement to the press 
setting forth United States policy for the preservation of human freedom in South 
Vietnam as well as our nation's firm determination to continue to seek an honor- 
able solution to this dispute is in complete harmony with America's traditional 
dedication to freedom and peace," Meany said. 

THE RECREATION FIELD should be the source of many "new job opportunities of the 
kind envisioned in President Johnson's Job Development Plan for the service 
industries," says Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz. Wirtz pointed out that 
today the average American has 160 hours more leisure time than he. had in 1960, 
largely because of longer vacations and paid holidays. 

FAIR PACKAGING AND LABELING BILL introduced by Senator Philip A. Hart, Michigan 
Democrat, has been strongly backed by the Johnson Administration, through Assist- 
ant Secretary of Labor Esther Peterson. Despite powerful business opposition and 
reports that the Administration might not fight for the bill, Mrs. Peterson went 
out of her way to assure the Senate Commerce Committee that the Administration's 
position had not changed from the day, two years ago, when she appeared in support 
of the legislation. At the same time, the AFL-CIO also strongly supported the 
bill as demanding "no more than integrity from the packaging industry." 

FOR 15 YEARS OR MORE the U. S. State Department has been "bugged by bugs" in 
U. S. Embassies abroad, especially behind, the Iron Curtain. Try as it might, be 
State Department has not been able to eliminate the hidden listening devices and 
even cameras planted in American embassies. Finally, and at long last, the State 
Department remembered the "miracle men" of World War II. The famous Seabees, 
Construction Battalions, were estimated to be 98% union men and performed the 
impossible from one end of the Pacific to another. "We've decided we'd better 
leave the solving of this problem up to the Seabees," the State Department told 
the House Appropriations Committee, and asked for $900,000 to put the Seabees to 
work. The result: 21 Seabee electricians, carpenters, plumbers and plasterers 
will work on all important embassies to be built or repaired from now on, and 
38 other Seabees will supervise and keep under "constant observation" all foreign 
workers hired for embassy construction. "Debugging by Seabees will make us 
termite-proof," explained a Navy officer. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



You Can Help "Books For Appalachia" 



TROM THE HEART of one of 

America's most seriously-depressed 
areas has come an appeal to the 
Brotherhood of Carpenters to enlist 
the skills of its members in the na- 
tion's "War on Poverty." 

Under the sponsorship of the Office 
of Economic Opportunity, that directs 
the poverty war, and the National 
Congress of Parents and Teachers, an 
organization called the Appalachian 
Volunteers of the Council of the 
Southern Mountains, Inc., is adminis- 
tering a program to furnish basic 
school library books to the one- and 
two-room schools of Appalachia. In 
a letter to President Maurice Hutche- 
son, they have solicited the voluntary 
labor of members of the Carpenters 
in the construction of specially- 
designed boxes for transporting the 
books. 

"Books for Appalachia," as the pro- 
gram is called, is directed toward im- 
proving the educational opportunities 
of children in the one- and two-room 
schools in the Appalachia Mountain re- 
gions of Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Vir- 
ginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, 



North Carolina, Alabama and Georgia. 
The lack of education is an important 
aspect of the problems of the region. 
The Appalachian Volunteers wish to 
place balanced and suitable collections 
of books in these schools which now 
frequently offer children no reading 
material except limited numbers of 
.state-issued textbooks. It is hoped that 
access to this supplementary material 
will broaden the scope of the present 
curricula in these schools and provide 
the intellectual boost the children need 
to improve their life chances in our 
competitive society. 

Through the generous cooperation 
of REA Express, special bargain rates 
have been allowed for shipping the 
donated books in specially-constructed 
wooden boxes. These boxes will serve 
a triple function, having been also 
designed to act as book shelves in the 
limited space and facilities of the small 
schools and to make possible the con- 
venient and safe exchange of book col- 
lections between schools. 

Locals of the Brotherhood of Car- 
penters are being asked by the Appala- 
chian Volunteers and encouraged by 




President Hutcheson to take on the 
worthwhile project of constructing 
these simple but sturdy boxes as their 
contribution to the "War on Poverty." 
The broader the base of cooperation 
in this combined federal and private 
effort, the more of our citizens will 
feel the concern which must be stimu- 
lated to solve the difficult problems of 
poverty in the midst of America's 
plenty. 

In local communities, "Books for 
Appalachia" is a project of the Parent- 
Teacher Associations. Locals or indi- 
vidual members willing to undertake 
this worthwhile service project should 
contact their PTA or at least be pre- 
pared to cooperate when and if they 
are contacted. 



LIBRARY PROJECT - BOOK BOX PLAN 



l"x2" CLEAT 




1/4" MASONITE 



l"x2" CLEAT 



MATERIALS for the construction of the 
library project book boxes are as 
follows . 

72" x 1" x 10" pine (finished) 
13V2" x 24" sheet masonite for back 
Two 13'/2" x J" x 2" pine cleats 
Screws, nails and glue 
Furniture tacks and small screws for 
the masonite 



V4" masonite cover 

INSTRUCTIONS 

1) Cut pieces from finished 1" x 
10" stock. (The actual dimensions 
of the 1" x 10" will be V4" x 
93/4") 

2) Fit and secure pieces with glue 



and several screws with nails 
interspersed 

3) Masonite backing should be glued 
and tacked to 1" x 10" frame, 
with several small screws inter- 
spersed 

4) Attach 1" x 2" cleats with screws. 
Cleats serve as handles. 



JUNE, 196S 



13 



Millwright Skills 
Serve trie Space Age 

A steady hand and intense concentration 

are essential qualities required of our Local 1402 

members as they help place a giant steel magnet 

in position for a space age research program 



THE precision skills of the union 
millwright are being put to the 
test this month, as members of Local 
Union 1402 of Richmond, Virginia, 
help to place a giant magnet in posi- 
tion for space-age research. 

Working to tolerances of .008 of an 
inch in an 18-inch work space, these 
skilled craftsmen are drilling holes for 
machined pins, so that 270 tons of 
steel can be positioned in a 600-mil- 
lion electron volt synchrocyclotron . . . 
which is a technical way of describing 
a Cadillac-type of atom smasher. 

Catalytic Construction Company, 
one of our national contractors and 
signatory to our agreement, is present- 
ly involved in the installation of the 
synchrocyclotron, a proton-beam ex- 
traction and transport system, a 10 
mev linear electron accelerator and a 
3 mev dynamitron with a electron 
beam transport system. 

This work is being performed for 
the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administrations Langley Research 
Center in the building of a Space Radi- 
ation Effects Laboratory in Newport 
News, Virginia, the purpose being to 
develop materials for use in space 
problems. This is an example of how 
millwrights become involved in highly- 
integrated and extremely - technical 
construction projects in this modern 
era. 

It behooves us, therefore, to con- 
tinue to upgrade our skills and knowl- 
edge and continue to make our work 
practices conducive to the promotion 
of the industry, if we are to continue 
to grow in our ever-expanding eco- 
nomic and technical world. 

The main magnet is the heart of the 
600 mev synchrocyclotron being in- 
stalled by Catalytic. It consists of 2700 
tons of steel. Proper operation of the 
machine required that the steel be as- 
sembled in such a manner that two 
50-ton center pole tips, which are 16 
feet in diameter and approximately 14 
inches apart, are positioned within .008 




Millwrights of Local Union 1402 drilling 1,000 two-inch 
diameter holes in bottom pole tip to improve the magnetic held. 



of an inch. The steel was manufac- 
tured at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 
and delivered to the job site in 54 
50-ton slabs. The assignment of as- 
sembling magnet steel was made to the 
Millwrights Local Union 1402, Rich- 
mond, Virginia. Each piece, as it 
arrived, was cleaned, inspected, and 
surface defects incurred during ship- 
ment were repaired. The Millwrights' 
work on the assembly of the magnet 
started with leveling and aligning the 
two support rails. Eighteen horizontal 
bottom yoke pieces were installed in 
place, leveled, set for elevation within 
.010 of an inch, and aligned parallel 
to the center line of the machine. Ten 
vertical legs were set, and the 18 hori- 
zontal top yokes and eight pole pieces 
were set in preliminary position. A 
measurement of the actual gap be- 
tween the two pole tips then was 
taken, and each of the 18 slabs which 
make up the top yoke of the magnet 
were individually shimmed for proper 
elevation, allowing for deflection dur- 
ing bolting, so that the final gap would 
be the proper distance. The pole tip 
bolts were then torqued to 16,000 



ft-lbs, and the gap between the pole 
tips measured. The gap, as measured 
in 235 different places, was within a 
tolerance of =p .005 of an inch as 
specified. 

The concentricity, or measurement 
of whether one pole tip was directly 
above the other, was taken using dial 
indicators. Adjustments were made 
until the tolerance of .008 of an inch 
was obtained. The 54 pieces which 
make up this magnet have now been 
welded together and were accepted by 
NASA as a job "well done". 

The steel in the magnet was forged 
and machined by Bethlehem Steel 
Company and erected in their shop. 
It was checked by Catalytic Construc- 
tion Company's engineers in the Beth- 
lehem shop to determine that tight 
tolerances could be met in the field. 
The magnet was then disassembled 
and shipped by railway, one piece to 
a car, ready for the Millwrights to 
begin their work. 

NASA's synchrocyclotron was initi- 
ally a copy of a machine located in 
Geneva, Switzerland. However, after 
some of the initial magnetic field 



14 



THE CARPENTER 




measurements were made, it was de- 
cided by NASA that it was possible 
to make this machine better than the 
original, which was designed and is 
operated by the Central European 
Organization for Nuclear Research 
(CERN). A number of calculations 
and studies were made by NASA 
and the Virginia Associated Research 
Center to determine how best this 
might be done. It was finally decided 
that the best way to improve the 
machine was to drill approximately 
one thousand 2-inch diameter holes in 
the bottom pole tip and add small 
washer-shaped shims in these holes. 
This appeared to be a most difficult 
undertaking, since the Millwrights 
would be required to do all of this 
work within a space of only 14 inches. 
However, a system was worked out 
and the schedule established for this 
work. Since every day it took to drill 
the holes added one day to the sched- 
ule, all of this work was done on a 
"crash" basis. In the final analysis, this 
part of the project was a success and 
exceeded expectations of the engineers 
and scientists. It is unique in that, due 
to this final fine shimming, the mag- 
netic field as measured in gauss was 
adjusted to within two parts in 18,000! 

As the project continues, the Mill- 
wrights of Local 1402 are now level- 
ing and aligning 26 magnets of the 
proton beam extraction and transport 
system which range in weight from 
two to 27 tons to a tolerance of zc .020 
of an inch to provide proper control 
for the beam coming out of the 
cyclotron. 

In addition to the 600 mev synchro- 
cyclotron installation, the Millwrights 
will be used in the installation of the 
10 mev linear accelerator and the 3 
mev dynamitron along with their as- 
sociated equipment such as water 
pumps, vacuum pumps, blowers, etc. 

Carpenters provide necessary sup- 
port and back-up for the Millwrights 
on this project. 




Early stages of magnet assembly; bottom coil in place. 




A device for measuring the magnetic field, installed in gap. 







Final stages of assembly; plastic sheeting protects the project. 




JUNE, 1965 



15 



A revolution in compact power 
tool design from Skil! 



It's a super compact 
masonry hammer-drill! 



It's an all-purpose 
Vb-inch drill! 





New Skil Model 624! Fully 8 inches shorter 
overall than any other hammer-drill its size 



Here's a hammer-drill so com pact you can 
put two of 'em end-to-end and they'd still 
be shorter overall than any other single 
tool this size. It goes without saying— No 
hammer-drill made goes where the 624 does! 

Flip the switch to "hammer" and you 
get 21,500 blows per minute, (with power 
rotation of a percussion carbide bit) to 
make holes up to %" in masonry— fast. 

Flip 'erto "drill" and you've got a heavy- 
duty V^-incher, compact enough to work in 
tight spots between studs and joists, pow- 
erful enough to drive wood augers, hole 



saws and big self-feeding bits. And you 
never have to baby it because the Super 
Burnout Protected Motor was made to 
take overloads and abuse and bounce 
right back. 

There's never been anything like the 
624. Just $109.50. Also Hammer-Drill Kit 
Model 627 with y 4 ", %" and V 2 " percussion 
carbide bits, steel carrying case, only 
$124.50. Ask your Skil representative 
about the new Model 680 Vz" Compact 
Drill, too. Or write: Skil Corp., Dept. I40F, 
5033 Elston Ave., Chicago 60630. 




f&a. model TOOL TOOL TOOL 

624 6?d ABC 



Chart shows clearly ultra com- 
pactness of the 624. Just 7Vt 
inches long, shorter than most 
l A" electric drills. 



Go lAKtln ike pick of the, pnos... 



pnu/polrnni c 



More 

good news 
from Skil 




Model 100 Heavy-Duty Plane— Motor-on- 
top design lets you use it as a surface 
plane on large areas as well as an edge 
plane. Has full 90° bevel adjustment (45° 
left or right) .0 to Vs" depth adjustment. 
Tooth-belt drive needs no lubrication. 
Fence mounts on either side or removes 
for planing large surfaces. 




Model 856 6V," Super-Duty Saw-A 

rugged top handle performer built for 
day-in, day-out professional use. Has 
Super-Burnout Protected motor that 
withstands frequent excessive overload- 
ing, rugged helical gears and Ball and 
Roller Bearings, Vari-torque safety clutch, 
push-button blade lock, many more. 
Super-Duty Models also available in 7 l A", 
8y 4 " and 10" sizes. 




Model 78 V." Heavy-Duty Drill— Combines 
the extra lightweight compactness and 
convenience of a pistol-grip drill with high 
torque (750 rpm) large chuck capacity 
and "tough job" power. Quality built with 
5 ball and 3 needle-roller bearings and 
precision cut gears. Has trigger switch, 
pin for locking in "on" position, cord pro- 
tector. Side handle for extra leverage 
removes for drilling in tight spots. 

FREE DEMONSTRATION! 

Call your Skil distributor for a free dem- 
onstration. You'll find him listed under 
"Tools-Electric" in the Yellow Pages. Or 
write Skil Corpora- 
tion. Department 
1 40F, 5033 Elston 
Avenue, Chicago. 
Illinois 60630. POWER^TOOLS 

JUNE, 1965 



SW4. 



Report On BCTD Legislative Conference 



Continued from page 11 

are based on merit and qualifications 
of the individuals. 

"We seek to impose no quotas, no 
preferential treatment on the basis of 
color or other factors. We expect 
that all applicants for apprenticeship 
programs will be given fair and 
equitable treatment, and I know that 
many of you have gone out of your 
■way to see that this has been ac- 
complished." 

If the personal appearance of the 
bi-partisan legislative leaders and ad- 
ministrative figures was not enough 
in itself to make this tenth legislative 
session successful, the findings of the 
hard-working delegates during two 
full days of visits with Senators and 
Congressmen on Capitol Hill was 
most auspicious. 

Never before had they been so 
warmly received or had such unmis- 
takable commitments of solid back- 
ing for organized labor's legislative 
program been received, they reported. 

Yet, from every authoritative 
source, from President Johnson, 
Meany, Haggerty to the legislative 
leaders, came the clear warning that 
the rank-and-file must not relent for 
an instant in the fight to get labor's 
programs enacted. 

Speaker after speaker stressed that 
Congressmen and Senators must be 
written to, telephoned and, especially 
when they are back in their home 
territories, spoken to so that there 
would be no letup of effort. Nothing, 
it was emphasized, can be taken for 
granted. 

Johnson himself referred to the need 
of maintaining what Meany described 



as "the people's lobby" when he dis- 
closed that he soon would send his 
labor message to Capitol Hill. 

"By the way," he remarked, "while 
we are talking, I want to make ar- 
rangements with you today to realize 
that we don't just send these messages 
up to Congress to be read. "We send 
them up there to be acted upon, up 
or down." 

House Speaker McCormack pre- 
dicted that most of labor's legislative 
program would be enacted but he 
warned that repeal of 14-b "might 
be won or lost by ten votes," so that 
co-ordination of efforts was manda- 
tory. 

Two liberal Republican senators — 
Javits of New York and Kuchel of 
California — joined in calling for re- 
peal of Section 14-b and urged pas- 
sage of the on-site picketing bill. 

Democratic Senators McNamara 
and Randolph, noting the legislative 
advances of recent years, stressed the 
need to maintain the effort. They also 
supported expanded public works de- 
velopment under regional umbrellas. 

Congressman Thompson said his 
House labor subcommittee would 
start hearings on the job site picket- 
ing bill immediately following action 
on 14-b. 

Congressman Ford pledged bipar- 
tisan support of the president's ac- 
tions in the Dominican Republic. 
But he expressed the opinion that 
the country would be better off if the 
minority party were stronger and 
asked the delegates to consider the 
benefits of a two-party system, espe- 
cially if the Republican Party made 
certain that "the labor movement 
has its day in court." 



Employee Rights for Military Training 



The job rights of workers who go on 
summer training as members of the 
Armed Services Reservists or National 
Guard are spelled out in a notice just 
issued by the U.S. Department of Labor. 

The director of the Office of Vet- 
eran's Reemployment Rights, Hugh W. 
Bradley, recently stated that under re- 
employment rights laws the job isn't 
really left in the sense that a vacancy 
exists; however, even these short tours 
of duty place certain responsibilities on 
both parties. He listed these principal 
requirements: 

Employees must — 

* Request a leave of absence for 
training. 

• Report back promptly when it is 
over. 



Employers must — 

* Grant leave for official training 

duty. 
Reinstate the employee on his re- 
turn with such seniority, status, 
pay and vacation rights as though 
he had not left. 
Bradley pointed out that the rules 
which govern the trainee's right to re- 
employment are essentially the same as 
those which guarantee these rights to 
the regular servicemen. 

The principal difference is in the re- 
port-back time for the trainee. Follow- 
ing training duty, the reservist or na- 
tional guardsman must return to work 
without delay after his release or on his 
arrival at his home city after the tour 
of duty. 



17 





EDITORIALS 



* BOATS, TIME, AND MONEY 

Our "cover story" this issue, describes pleasure 
boat construction on Maryland's Eastern Shore — 
where almost every citizen, at one time or another, 
takes to the waters of Chesapeake Bay for recreation. 
Many members of the Brotherhood here . . . and across 
the continent, as well — own their own boats, thanks to 
union-won wages and union-won hours for enjoying 
them. 

Organized labor can claim a share of the credit for 
the upsurge in recreational boating. Good union con- 
tracts have made it possible for wage earners to buy 
and operate pleasure boats where, in another day and 
time, it would have been unthinkable. Time was when 
a worker was hard-pressed to feed his family, much 
less take them on a cruise! 

* STRONGER DRUG CONTROLS 

Strong endorsement of legislation to tighten Federal 
controls over depressant and stimulant drugs has been 
voiced by organized labor. A bill known as the Drug 
Abuse Control Amendments of 1965. would revise the 
Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act to suppress illegal sales 
of barbituates, amphetamines and similar drugs. 

The bill, called HR 2, has passed the House of 
Representatives and now awaits action in the Senate. 
It must first be studied by the Senate Labor and Public 
Welfare Committee, and, so far, no hearings are sched- 
uled. 

It would be a pity to see this vital drug legislation 
sicken and die in committee. Perhaps the committee 
is figuratively sampling the barbituates, when actually 
"pep pills" are needed. 

* WHY HIGHER EDUCATION? 

With millions of school children beginning summer 
vacation, you may have a son or a daughter who just 
received a high-school diploma. While some fathers 
would like to have their sons follow in their foot- 
steps, many sons do not want to follow their father's 
trade. 

If such is the case with your son, it might be wise 
to sit down with him and have a frank discussion about 
higher education. Help him plot a course for school- 
ing and show him the best way to finance it. The im- 
portant thing is to work with him and don't discourage 
his ambition. 



The degree of education which one strives for de- 
pends on the eventual goal he wishes to attain. A 
college degree has become a basic requirement for 
those applying for more and more jobs today. 

As Dean William Haber of the University of Mich- 
igan recently said: "Outlays for education are finally 
being identified as investments rather than expendi- 
tures." 

* WHO WANTS THE "WRECK" LAW? 

Now that President Johnson has used his high of- 
fice in a plea for repeal of Section 14(b) of the Taft- 
Hartley Act, the issue looms even higher on the 
legislative agenda of the 89th Congress. 

For months, organized labor has been asking its 
friends in the Congress to support repeal of Sec- 
tion 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act. This is the sec- 
tion of the law under which the Federal Government 
surrenders its jurisdiction in the area of the union 
shop and permits states to pass so-called "right-to- 
work" laws banning union shop contracts. 

Here are some of the reasons why organized labor 
seeks repeal of the compulsory open shop section of 
Taft-Hartley: 

The National Interest — -The healthiest areas of the 
country are those in which trade union organization 
is widespread. Unions help to elevate purchasing 
power which, in turn, aids business both large and 
small. Generally speaking, so-called "right-to-work" 
states are those which have the lowest per capita 
income. 

Workers Want Union Shop — There seems to be 
little question that workers want union security. You'll 
find few workers are on so-called "right-to-work" 
committees around the country. Most such commit- 
tees are made up of employers. 

The Moral Issue — Top religious leaders of this 
country from all major faiths oppose "work" laws on 
a moral basis. Declared the executive board of the 
Division of Christian Life and Work of the National 
Council of Churches of Christ in America: ". . . union 
membership as a basis of continued employment 
should be neither required nor forbidden by law; the 
decision should be left to agreement by management 
and labor through the process of collective bargain- 
ing." 

This is what repeal of Section 14(b) would accom- 
plish. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



1 4r Iganadian Report 



MEDICARE ACROSS CANADA 



If you are biting your fingernails in 
anxious anticipation that a national 
health plan is near reality in Canada, 
you can save your nervous system by 
forgetting about it — temporarily. 
There are no signal lights flashing on 
the horizon that a national plan is go- 
ing to happen soon. Give it, say, ten 
years. 

In the meantime a pattern of medi- 
care seems to be forming which, while 
not delineating a national health serv- 
ices system in the true meaning of the 
words, might find every province with 
some kind of medicare — all of them 
short of labor's goal, yet all of them 
a step or several steps toward the 
optimum objective of a national plan 
for all Canadians which all can readi- 
ly afford and with discrimination 
toward none. 

Taking a quick swing across Cana- 
da, the medicare situation in the 
provinces is something like this. 

In the maritime provinces, nothing 
much is doing except in Newfoundland 
which has had for some years a 
"cottage hospital scheme" whereby 
citizens in outlying areas (and al- 
most every part of the island is "out- 
lying") can get medical care at gov- 
ernment expense while children up to 
sixteen also get surgical care at no 
direct cost. 

As for Quebec, the government has 
already made its views known that 
some kind of health services program 
will be introduced but no actual plan 
has been announced. 

Ontario is in the throes of conflict 
triggered by the introduction in April 
1963 of a medicare plan by Premier 
Robarts. This legislation would pro- 
vide subsidies to the lowest income 
groups for medical attention, and set 
standards for private insurance 
schemes to be available at govern- 
ment-approved rates. All but the low- 
est income groups would pay the 
standard rates. The doctors and the 
insurance companies generally ap- 
prove the plan. The public, including 
unions, farm groups, welfare agencies, 
consumer groups, agree with the To- 
ronto newspaper which called it 
"horse-and-buggy medicare". 



On May 1 1, the Ontario government 
re-introduced its medical care bill to 
the Legislature in amended form. It 
has met some, but by no means all, 
of the criticisms. The new medicare 
plan will come into effect June 1, 1966. 

The people of Manitoba rely at the 
moment on a private doctor-sponsored 
Manitoba Medical Services plan to 
which about 60 per cent of the public 
subscribe. Presumably the premiums 
are too high for the rest of the popula- 
tion, which is one of the big objec- 
tions to all private plans. 

Saskatchewan held the world lime- 
light for a while when it was giving 
birth to its medicare plan. The doc- 
tors went on strike against it. But the 
birth took place anyway, and today 
that province enjoys the best plan in 
Canada at the lowest rates, and even 
the doctors seem to be not too un- 
happy with it. As for the public, they 
wouldn't do without it. After all, the 
premium for a family of any size is 
only $55 a year if the breadwinner is 
making between $4500 and $5000 a 
year. Premiums under private plans 
in the other provinces are about triple 
this amount. 

The next prairie province, Alberta, 
was the first to establish a medicare 
plan using private insurers and sub- 
sidizing the low income groups with 
public funds. The family which pays 
$55 a year under the government plan 
in Saskatchewan, would pay $159 in 
Alberta. 

What is shaping up, then, is ten 
provinces with ten plans. This doesn't 
add up to a national plan, but who 
knows? Some time some government 
at Ottawa will do what a Royal Com- 
mission has already said it should, that 
is, establish a national health services 
program, subsidized with federal funds 
and, like the hospital plan already in 
operation, administered by the prov- 
inces. 

Commons Boosts 
Home Building Funds 

If any chance existed that the cur- 
rent building boom would have a 
short life, it was just about eliminated 
by the voting of additional funds by 



the federal government for home- 
building. 

The House of Commons gave quick 
approval to the government's proposal 
to boost the funds available under the 
National Housing Act by $3.6 billion. 
Central Mortgage and Housing, the 
federal housing agency, will now have 
a bigger chunk of money to stimulate 
house construction, urban renewal, 
public housing, university housing and 
so on. 

With residential construction reach- 
ing a record level last year with 165,- 
685 housing starts, new heights in 
homebuilding could be reached this 
year and next. The general feeling 
is that a giant building boom is in 
the making. 

Question: Do Wages 
Push Up Prices? 

Often enough the first reaction to 
wage demands in important indus- 
tries like steel and construction is 
that, if the demands are conceded, 
it would lead to inflation. Prices 
would be forced up. What the wage- 
earner would win as a worker, he 
would lose as a consumer. People on 
fixed incomes like old age pensioners 
would be hardest hit. All this would 
happen if labor got the wage boosts 
it demanded. 

Union researchers have just as often 
provided facts and figures to show 
that usually prices go up first and 
wage demands follow. 

Now a study by the federal De- 
partment of Labor called "Wage De- 
termination in Canada" seems to bear 
out labor's contention. The study in- 
dicates that there is "little likelihood 
that wage increases are a cause of 
price inflation". It shows that wage 
behavior is dominated by economic 
influences. 

Dr. George Saunders who publishes 
the study says: 

"Wages have generally moved 
quickly or slowly in response to 
changes in economic activity," point- 
ing out that in one significant period 
of price increases, 1957-58, the in- 
creases occurred in "the weakly un- 
ionized food and services sectors" so 
that it was not very likely "that nego- 
tiated wage settlements were as im- 
portant in pushing up prices in that 
Continued on page 37 



JUNE, 1965 



19 



tf HOME STUDY COURSE 




BASIC MATHEMATICS 



This and succeeding units will deal with new material 
as well as contain review problems covered in preceding 
units. It is hoped that each participating carpenter will 
set up a series of problems of his own in order to practice 
the skill being covered in these units. This unit covers the 
process of multiplication of whole numbers. 

MULTIPLICATION OF WHOLE NUMBERS— Multiplica- 
tion is the short process of adding the same number (called 
the multiplicand) a specific number of times (called the 
multiplier). The answer to a multiplication problem is 
called the product. 

EXAMPLE: Find the product of 58 x 347. 



3 47 

58 

2776 



347 
58 



2776 
1735 



347 
58 



2776 
1735 
20 126 



Place the multiplier (58) under the multipli- 
cand (347). Start to solve the problem by 
multiplying 8x7 which equals 56. Place the 
6 under the units column (under the 7 of the 
multiplicand) and remember that you must 
carry over the 5 from the 56 to the next step. 
Now multiply 8x4 which equals 32. Add 
the 5 which was carried over to the 32. 
32 + 5 = 37. Place the 1_ under the tens 

column (under the 3 of the multiplicand) 
and carry over the 3. Multiply 8x3 which 
equals 24 and add the 3 which was carried 
over. 24 + 3 = 27. Place the 27 in such a 

manner that the 7 is under the hundredth 
column (under the 4 of the multiplicand) 
This number, 2776, is called a partial product 
in the multiplication process. 

Now multiply 5x7 which equals 35. Place 
the 5 in the tens column and carry the 3 to 
the next step. Multiply 5x4 which equals 
20 and add the 3 that was carried over. 20 

+ 3 =23. Place the 3 under the hundredths 

column and carry the 2 to the next step. 
Multiply 5x3 which equals 15 and add the 
2 that was carried over. 15 + 2 = 17. Place 
the 17 in such a manner that the 7 falls under 

the 1000's column. The second partial prod- 
uct is 1735. 

Draw a line under the two partial products. 
Add the partial products to get the final prod- 
uct which is 20126. 58 x 347 = 20126. 
In the multiplication process, one must be 
careful to keep each partial product in the 
correct alignment with the other partial prod- 
ucts during the solving of the problem to 
permit accurate addition. Also, remember 
to place the first number to be listed in the 
product under the number of the multiplier 
being used. 



Solve the following multiplication problems: 

1. 23 2. 321 3. 38 4. 82 

x8 x7 xl2 x66 



5. 
9. 


49 

x92 

319 
x73 

472 x 
538 x 
43x6 
302 x 

4036 
x607 

2191 
x203 

4052 
xl9 


6. 247 
x26 

10. 803 1 

,\84 

938 = 


7. 387 8. 
x62 

1. 2563 12. 
x 24 


974 
x95 

2504 
x 71 


* 


13. 


17. 200x4893 

18. 986x7230 

19. 2155x867 

20. 706 x 6304 

23. 1327 
x689 

27. 9001 
x835 

31. 479 
x59 







14. 


1009 = 


= 




15. 


058 = 


25 = 




16. 


1912 = 




21. 


22. 52768 
X5512 

26. 8506 

x34 

30. 3625 

x42 


24. 
28. 
32. ( 


3984 
x200 


25. 


839 

x274 


29. 


>058 
.835 



Solve the following review problems: 

1. 23 + 45 + 67 + 89 = 

2. 945 + 727 + 389 + 22 = 



3. 402 + 97 + 8347 + 463 = 

4. 479 + 508 + 73 + 5246 = 

5. 31 + 642 + 7953 + 607 = 

6. 97 — 68 = 



7. 


503 — 364 = 


8. 


7216—3249 = 


9. 


8123 — 6547 = 


10. 


4287— 1989 = 


11. 


245 + 746 + 9644 = 



12. 833 +416 + 417 + 1666 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



13. 3291 + 1645 - 

14. 746 — 245 = 



1646 



15. 9644 — 833 = 

16. 1666 — 416= 

17. 3219 — 2143 = 

18. 10887 — 4651 = 

19. 4684 + 596 + 3111 + 1609 = 

20. 9610 — 2143 = 



Answers to problems above on page 32 ' 



DID YOU CATCH THE ERROR? 
. . . the wrong answer to the No. 1 subtraction 
problem in the first installment of Home Study 
Course, Page 19 of our May issue? Many readers 
did . . . and we apologize. The answer should 
have been 36, not 35. It was a printer's error, 
and we'll try not to let it happen again. 



Pleasure Boat Building 

Continued from Page 7 

ished panels. Modern sealants and preservatives have 
also helped reduce maintenance problems for the vastly 
increased numbers of modern boat enthusiasts. 

The wooden boat has another quite valuable advan- 
tage for its owner; he may sand and stain and varnish 
it to his heart's content! There is little he can do to or 
for a metallic boat; nothing he can do for a glass fiber 
boat but scrub (ugh!) or wax (ugh!) it. But with wood, 
he can smooth and stain and varnish leisurely, shooting 
the breeze in neighborly fashion with the fellow on his 
boat in the next slip, idly sipping on a cold beer and 
looking for the perfection in his varnishing which he 
had barely missed the time before (it was too cold or 
too hot or too humid or too windy). He will savor the 
smoothness through his fingertips and await the praise 
of his dockmates who will dutifully exclaim: "A wonder- 
ful brightwork job .... looks like a real professional 
job!" Where but from wood can come such joy? 



HIRING RATE HITS '55 LEVEL IN MARCH 

Factories began to exhaust their rosters of laid- 
off workers in March and took on new employes 
in sufficient volume to send the hiring rate to its 
highest seasonally-adjusted level since the winter 
of 1955, the Labor Dept.'s Bureau of Labor Sta- 
tistics reported. 

The hiring rate moved from 35 per 1,000 work- 
ers in February to 39 in March, slightly above 
normal, and the seasonally-adjusted rate rose to 
32 per 1,000 workers. The lay-off rate was un- 
changed from February's 12 per 1,000 workers, 
a 10-year low. 

As chances for jobs broadened, the rate soared 
to 15 per 1,000 workers, 25 percent higher than 
a year ago and the highest seasonally-adjusted 
level in eight years. 




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Estwing 



MFG. CO. Dept. C-6 
2647 - 8th Street 
Rockford, Illinois 



JUNE, 1965 



21 








Absolute Proof 

In the Russian school, the class was 
discussing Adam and Eve. "And what 
nationality were they?" asked the 
teacher. 

"Russians!" answered a student 
from Hungary. "Excellent!" replied 
the teacher. "How do we know this?" 

"Because," replied the young Hun- 
garian, "they had no roof over their 
heads, no clothes on their backs and 
only one apple between them to eat 
. . . and they called it Paradise!" 

— Mrs. R. E. Epps, 
Winton, Calif. 

REGISTER TO VOTE 



f^w^s 





Night and Day 

"How do you like my new evening 
gown?" asked the wife. 

"Pretty, but confusing," was the 
reply. 

"How do you mean confusing?" 

"Well," said the husband, "I can't 
decide whether you're on the inside 
trying to get out, or on the outside 
trying to get in." 

TAKE PART IN UNION AFFAIRS 

On the Fence 

Almost everyone knows the differ- 
ence between right and wrong. Some 
just hate to make decisions. 

ALWAYS BOOST YOUR UNION 

If the Shoe Fits . . . 

People who act like heels . . . de- 
serve to get stepped on! 



Very Special Delivery 

The Department of Defense re- 
ceived this letter from a boy in Okla- 
homa: "Send me all the information 
you have on airplanes." Since he 
wanted it in a hurry, he added: 
"Please send it by guided missile." 

UNITED WE STAND 

Pauline's Pearls 

And there was the girl who was so 
suspicious she wouldn't even accept 
an imitation pearl necklace because 
she was sure there was a string at- 
tached! 

UNION DUES — TOMORROW'S SECURITY 

Legal Vote 

At a polling place a man and wom- 
an started to go into a voting booth 
together. "It's all right," the man 
explained when an official stopped 
them. "We're married." 



R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE? 

Only Fair Return! 

In an Irish village the priest and 
the doctor were always sparring but 
the doctor always went to confession 
to the priest. Then the priest fell ill 
and the doctor cured him. When the 
priest tried to pay him, the doctor 
would take nothing. "We're quits al- 
ready, Father. You keep me out of 
hell, and I keep you out of heaven." 

— Ralph C. Hardouin, 
New Orleans, La. 

BUY AT UNION RETAIL STORES 

Only Proper! 

The lieutenant conducting an in- 
spection found books in the recruit's 



This Month's Limerick 

A do-it-yourselfer named Zammer 
Bragged that he was good with a 
hammer. 
Until his wife said, "Joe, 
Grab a nail and let's go!" 
Then he smashed his thumb quite a 
whammer! 

■ — Edwin Gieselman, Sr., 
Benton, III. 



laundry bag and demanded an ex- 
planation. 

"Certainly, sir," replied the roqkie. 
"They're dirty books!" 

IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH 

rhe Corrupter 

Billy's mother asked him why he 
didn't play with the little boy next 
door. "He's a nice boy," she re- 
minded him, "and I never heard him 
say naughty words." 

"No," Billy admitted, "but you will 
tomorrow. I just told him some." 

BE UNION BUY LABEL 




Post-Graduate Course! 

A young fellow walked into a cabi- 
net shop looking for a job. "Sure," 
said the owner, "You can start by 
sweeping out the shop!" "But I'm a 
college graduate!" cried the appli- 
cant. "That's okay," replied the own- 
er. I'll show you how." 

USE ONLY UNION-MADE TOOLS 

Toute Suite Tooter 

Two ladies were waiting for the 
train and asked when it would arrive. 
"Somewhere between two to two and 
two-two," replied the station agent. 
"Who does he think he is," asked one 
woman of the other, "the whistle?" 

— Jos. M. Hilpert, 
Belleville, III. 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 



22 



THE CARPENTER 




/ 

/ 



LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Western Sawmill Workers Hold Convention 



PORTLAND, ORE— Progress, wide- 
scope reports, top-flight Brotherhood 
speakers and an attendance of some 550 
delegates, guests and wives — wrapped in 
a harmonious bundle describes the 28th 
annual four day convention of Western 
Council, Lumber and Sawmill Workers- 
UBC&J here April 12-15. 

Attendance jammed the Empire Room 
of the Multnomah Hotel to capacity with 
standing room only most of the four 
days, delegates hearing addresses by Peter 
Terzick. Brotherhood general treasurer, 
and R. E. Livingston, Brotherhood gen- 
eral secretary. 

Terzick turned back the pages of 
time, reviewing gains made by Lumber 
and Sawmill Workers during the past 
30 years, paying tribute to old-timers 
with the comment: "Many men today 
carry scars of those days of organizing." 

Turning the spotlight on Lumber and 
Sawmill Workers leadership, Terzick 
complimented Kenneth Davis, Brother- 
hood West Coast co-ordinator, and Earl 
Hartley, Western Council executive sec- 
retary, stating he "wouldn't trade this 
leadership of the past 30 years for 
anything." 

The general treasurer discussed the 
political trend, noting the only method 
of getting favorable candidates is to 
turn out at the polls election day. "We 
need strong political action," he said. 

General Secretary Livingston told dele- 
gates the lumber industry is an essential 
part of the national economy, that con- 
struction of new homes is" vital to success 
of the industry. 

"The construction industry is by far 
the largest single outlet for lumber," he 
said. "It accounts for 70 per cent of the 
total use of lumber. . . ." He emphasized 
the nation is growing, that "each year 
during the coming generations, we will 
have to build the equivalent of 15 cities 
of 200,000 persons each to take care 
of the increased population." 

Livingston said the physical decay of 
the nation's older cities is a problem — 
one that can be solved only through 
building at a much faster rate than ever 
before . . . decent homes, schools, all 
generally affecting the economy of the 
lumber industry. 

Lyle Hiller, general executive board 
member from the seventh district, ex- 
pressed pleasure with progress of the 
council, pointing that future together- 
ness would be stronger as the produc- 
tion and construction segments of the 
Brotherhood co-ordinated their efforts. 




The swearing-in of the officers of the Western Council. From left, Robert C. 
Weller, newly-elected president (executive secretary, Montana LSW District Council); 
James Bledsoe, newly-elected vice president (executive secretary, Portland-Coast Co- 
lumbia LSW District Council); Earl Hartley, re-elected executive secretary. Western 
Council; Keith Brown, warden, Local 1845, Snoqualmie, Wash.; Paul E. Dye, con- 
ductor, Local 2652, Standard, Calif. 




Joseph Hazard, retiring president, was presented traveling gifts by the Western 
Council at a special banquet. Left to right, Kenneth Davis, Brotherhood West Coast 
Co-ordinator; Lyle Hiller, General Executive Board Member from Seventh District; 
Earl Hartley, Executive Secretary, Western Council; Pete Terzick, Brotherhood Gen- 
eral Treasurer; Joseph Hazard; Patrick Hogan; General Executive Board Member, 
Eighth District; Mrs. Hazard, and R. E. Livingston, General Secretary. 



Patrick Hogan, general executive board 
member from the eighth district, ad- 
dressed the council executive commit- 
tee at its pre-convention session. 

Delegates wound up the four day con- 
vention after electing Robert C. Weller, 
executive secretary of Montana LSW 
District Council, as new president; James 
Bledsoe, executive secretary of Portland- 
Coast Columbia District Council, as vice 
president; Earl Hartley, re-elected as 



council executive secretary; Keith Brown. 
Local 1845, Snoqualmie, Wash., as 
warden and Paul E. Dye, Local 2652, 
Standard, Calif., as conductor. 

Other convention business included re- 
ports on 1966 negotiation plans by 
Hartley, action on 34 resolutions by dele- 
gates, report that The Union Register, 
official LSW-UBC&J weekly labor pub- 
lication is solidly self-sustaining. 



JUNE, 1965 



23 



25-Year Pins Presented by Local 1599 




REDDING, CALIF. — Local 1599 of Redding recently presented 25-year pins to: front row, from left — Blaine McKinney, George 
Specr, Jack Whiting and Charles Cundiff, Sr. Second row — Ray Tolliver, Frank Hazell, Alex Jamieson, Roy Fletcher, Tom Pear- 
son, Peter Mantis and Lester Nelson. Back row — Ralph Heidle, Carl Opsahl, David E. Allen, Frank Bryant and Sylvan VanDyke. 



Local 325 Presents 25-Year Pins 




PATERSON, N. J. — At a dinner given to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Local 325 of Paterson, 25-year pins were 
awarded to those members who were eligible. First row from the left: Edward Burns, Thomas Antonnucci, Michael Kearney, 
Alex Pirie, John Van Derweil, Ted Scheppe, Joseph Spinosa, Garret Zimemers and George Dunn. Second row: James Costa, Peter 
Esselman, Joe Boscorino, Herman Gieson, Daniel Leitch, Anthony Puluse, Robert Zindt and Peter Neiskens. Third row: George 
Doran, Anthony Avolio, Gilles Morrison, James Avolio, Robert Morrison, Jacob Maas, Albert Stoepker, Louis Okma, Board 
Member Raleigh Rajoppi, Patsy Rocco, Carmel Vivino, Jacob Jansen, Russell Clemens, Orie Hayunga and Bill Martin. 



L.U. 10, Chicago, 111 

L.U. 13, Chicago, 111 

L.U. 105, Cleveland, O. . . 
L.U. 176, Newport, R. I. . 
L.U. 180, Vallejo, Calif. . 
L.U. 642, Richmond, Calif. 
L.U. 801, Woonsocket, R.I. 



Recent Contributions to Kennedy-Roosevelt Fund 

1.65 
14.00 

3.20 
20.25 



24.15 


L.U. 


900, Altoona, Pa. .. 


43.75 


L.U. 


1083, New Castle, 


25.00 


N. 


B 


20.00 


L.U. 


1135, Port Jefferson, 


22.67 


N. 
L.U. 


Y 


30.00 


1319, Albuquerque, 


5.00 


N. 


M 



L.U. 1888, New York, 
N. Y 

L.U. 2189, Madera, 
Calif 


... $ 


2.50 
1.00 


L.U. 2264, Pittsburgh, 
Previous contributions 


Pa. 

. $ 
... $ 
... $ 


10.00 

223.17 

127,252.41 

127,475.58 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



Detroit JAC Holds Graduation Banquet 




Displaying the Journeymen's certificate given to 67 graduating apprentices at the 
19th Annual Graduation Banquet sponsored by the Detroit Carpentry Joint Appren- 
ticeship Committee are: left to right — L. M. "Boot" Weir, secretary of the Council; 
Roscoe Bricker, graduating apprentice; Jack Wood, secretary of the Council; Ernest 
E. Landry, chairman of the Apprenticeship Committee; Finlay C. Allan, First General 
Vice President of the Brotherhood; and John "Jack" Armstrong, president of Darin 
& Armstrong. 



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DETROIT, MICH.— The Detroit Car- 
pentry Joint Apprenticeship Committee 
held its 19th Annual Graduation Ban- 
quet on Saturday, March 13, 1965, at 
which time 67 graduating apprentices 
received their Journeyman's Certificates 
from the Brotherhood, and also their 
Certificates of Completion from the 
United States Department of Labor, Bu- 
reau of Apprenticeship and Training. 

On hand to present certificates were 
Finlay C. Allan, First General Vice 
President of the United Brotherhood; 
Stuart Proctor, retired Head Instructor, 
Apprentice Training School and member 
of International Apprenticeship Commit- 
tee; James Whyte, field representative of 



the Department of Labor's Bureau of Ap- 
prenticeship and Training; and Henry 
Tuck, Head Carpentry Instructor at the 
Apprentice Training School. 

Among the dignitaries attending this 
year's function were Jack Wood. Secre- 
tary-Manager of the Detroit Building 
Trades Council; State Senator Raymond 
D. Dzendzel, who is also a business agent 
of Local 982; and Jack Kelley, Deputy 
Commissioner, Department of Buildings 
and Safety Engineering, who represented 
Mayor Jerome P. Cavanagh. 

This year's toastmaster, L. M. "Boots" 
Weir, was presented with a scroll in 
honor of his outstanding service to the 
Apprenticeship Committee for the past 
13 years. 



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your own saw filing service in your 
basement or garage. A small cash pay- 
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your hands. The profits you make easily 
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■ UlCj ITIIg.UU. Minneapolis, Minn. 55418 



Seven Brothers 

NEWPORT, R. I.— The Furtado Broth- 
ers — seven of them — are all members of 
Local 176 in Newport. Their father was 
a contractor and taught his 10 sons the 
trade. He and one of his sons have since 
passed away. Two of the brothers are 
living away from Newport. 




Sixty-seven Detroit apprentices sit with officers of the joint apprenticeship committee and visitors for an official photograph. 
JUNE, 1965 25 



San Francisco Bay Apprentice Winners 
BAY AREA CARPENTERS 

JOINT APPRENTICESHIP COMMITTEES 

Ba^ CouNTits District Council of Carpenters 




I 



San Francisco Bay Area Apprentice Con- 
testants performed before several thou- 
sand persons attending the Annual Spring 
Garden Show in Oakland, Calif., May 8. 




Finalists are shown above with C. R. 
Bartalini, Sec'y Bay Counties District 
Council of Carpenters and Gordon Lift- 
man, Director of the Bay Area Carpen- 
ters Apprenticeship & Training Program. 
Contestants from left to right: Gordon 
Kvamme, Local 22, first place, John F. 
Warren, Local 22, fourth place, Richard 
Gordon, Local 35, third place, Sylvan 
Berges, Local 162, Honorable Mention, 
C. R. Bartalini, Gordon Littman, Joe 
Grigsby, Local 1473, Honorable Mention 
and Ken Kirstine, Local 162, second 
place. 

Left: Judges for the 1965 Bay Area Car- 
penters Apprentice Contest were former 
contestants. Shown with First Place Win- 
ner Gordon Kvamme are David Gladyz, 
Ron Francesconi and Richard Keeth. 



Arizona Apprentice Dinner Honors Grads 

YUMA, ARIZ. — At the annual completion 
dinner, sponsored by the Arizona Carpenters' 
Apprenticeship Committee, two apprentices re- 
ceived certificates as "Outstanding Apprentices" 
as well as their journeymen certificates. Don 
Savage, left and Robert Boggs, center, received 
their certificates from Ben Collins, general rep- 
resentative. 

Members of the Yuma JAC, shown below, 
are, left to right, Howard Hansen, coordinator; 
Bob McNeal, state committee; Whitey Wiles, 
Bill Pridgen and Red Marshall. 





State Senator Olson, 
A Member Retires 

FRAMINGHAM, MASS.— At a testi- 
monial dinner, given by his ninny friends. 
Senator Charles William Olson was paid 
tribute by more than 1000 people. A 
member of the Carpenters' for 55 years 
and a member of the General Court for 
30 years. Senator Olson recently retired 
from office. 

Although unable lo be present. Gover- 
nor John S. Volpe sent a Sterling Silver 
Paid Revere Bowl to the Senator, as a 
"symbol of appreciation and gratitude for 
all the services you have achieved." 




Among those at the Olson Dinner were, 
left to right, Joseph A. Martel, financial 
secretary of Local 860; Harry P. Hogan, 
general representative; the honored guest, 
Honorable Charles W. Olson; and An- 
drew E. Shusta, president of the Massa- 
chusetts State Council of Carpenters. 

When his family moved east from St. 
Paul, where Brother Olson was born, he 
decided to follow the carpentry trade, as 
his father and brothers had done. He was 
about 16 years old when he became a 
member of our Brotherhood Local 861, 
Southbridge, Mass., in October, 1909. A 
short while later he transferred his mem- 
bership to Local 1287 (no longer in exist- 
ence) in New Bedford, Mass. 

This local refused to allow him to 
work as a journeyman carpenter, as he 
was only 17, and they doubted his quali- 
fications at that time. Because of the per- 
sistence of Brother Olson, they finally 
gave him a special examination in which 
he proved he was capable. From then on 
he followed the trade. Even after he be- 
came a member of the Massachusetts 
House of Representatives in 1934 he 
worked during the summer months at his 
trade. He left New Bedford and became 
a member of Local 910, Gloucester, 
where he worked until his brother, who 
was foreman on the Ames Plow Co. Pro- 
ject in Framingham, Mass. area, urged 
him to come to work for him. 

He became a permanent resident of 
Ashland, Mass., and served in various 
capacities for the town until he was 
elected to the Massachusetts House in 
1934. In 1941 he was elected to the 
Senate where he served with honor and 
with the respect of his colleagues re- 
gardless of Party affiliation. 

THE CARPENTER 



1964 Pin Presentations of Local 2170 




SACRAMENTO, CALIF. — Local 2170 of Sacramento recently presented 25-year pins to the members shown above. Here 
are the names of the honorees (not in order pictured): 

Albert Ball, Urbie Batiste, Aubrey Bennet, Sam Bingham, A. E. Boething, William E. Bogue, Harry Bowen, John Bowman, 
E. R. Britton, Norman B. Brown, Earl Cantrell, C. F. Clifton, Wayne E. Cook, Kenneth Cort, R. I. Coram, Ralph Gilardi, A. 
E. Gordon, Byron Grimes, E. E. Haddick, William Hardt, Alvin E. Johnson, Howard Kay, Glen Keenan, Floyd Keuhey, 
Frank Larson, F. O. McGinnis, Phil MacKinnon, C. R. Morris, George P. Murphy, Ed Neher, John Neville, H. L. Newby, Gai- 
tano Nitopi, Harry Nyquist, L. H. Peters, A. Pleines, Edmund Redgate, T. S. Reichenberg, Jack Rowett, C. B. Shepley, E. E. 
Sherman. A. Silva, Harry Sollenberger, John Speck, Kenneth Spittler, W. F. Studebaker, Charles Theilbahr, Victor Virga, R. G. 
Wallace, H. M. Whitsitt and H. J. Young. 



York, Pa., Local 
Presents Pin 

YORK. PA.— On February 27, 1965, 
Local 191 of York held its sixth annual 
banquet. Some 280 members and guests 
were in attendance. General representa- 
tive Raymond Ginnetti represented the 
General Office and spoke on the history 
of Local 191. Twenty-five-year member- 
ship pins were presented to those mem- 
bers who were in attendance by Brother 
Ginnetti. Special recognition was given 
to three brothers who were unable to be 
present. They were: Harry C. Sunday 
for having 65 years of continuous mem- 
bership, Charles Sterner for having 59 
years, and Harvey A. Seachrist for hav- 
ing 49 years and for being the oldest liv- 
ing member, having reached the age of 92. 




In photo from York, from the left, are: Raymond Ginnetti, general representative; 
George McDermirt, Norman Weigard, William W. Reigart, John S. Ehrhart, Jesse 
Stambaugh, Warren Tyson and John Shanbarger, president of Local 191. Present at 
the banquet, although not in the photo, was pin-winner Stanley Carlson. 



Local 1753 Membership Pins Given 

LOCKPORT, ILL.— At the quarterly meeting of Local 1753 
in Lockport membership pins were presented to the following, 
from the left: Lawrence Nordstrom, president of Local 1753; 
Gust Fellman, former treasurer; Eddie Sandbloom, recording 
secretary; and Elmer Grant, trustee. Brothers Nordstrom, Fell- 
man and Grant received 40-year pins, and Sandbloom received 
a 35-year pin. 



Local 16 Presents Pins to 10 Members 




SPRINGFIELD, ILL.— Local 16 of Springfield recently pre- 
sented 25- and 50-year pins to 10 of its members. 

Fifty-year pins were given to (seated from the left): George 
Phelps, Robert Bell, Harry Graham and Mike Martin. 

Twenty-five year pins to (standing left to right): Firth Tom- 
linson, Victor Mathias, Henry Meiners, John Reilly, Frank 
Cope and George Carver. 



JUNE, 1965 



27 



POWER GUN 

Opens Sewer 
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THINK OF IT! 




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your own Business. Tear out Ad now & write 
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Local 756 Celebrates 
64th Anniversary 

BELLINGHAM, WASH.— The 64th 
anniversary of Local 756 was celebrated 
on March 19, 1965 with a banquet. The 
invocation was given by Reverend Den- 
ton Sutton, a member of Local 756. 
President James T. Crombic introduced 
Brother Sutton and the master of cere- 
monies G. Roscoe Hilliard. 

Among the speakers were: Brother 
Lyle Hiller, board member of the 7th 
District: H. H. Brown, president of the 
Washington State Council, and O. L. 
Ilaggen. business representative and 42- 
year member. 

Following the program. Brother An- 
tone Flotre was presented a 50-year 
pin. H. H. Brown presented 25-year 
pins to 55 members of the local. 

Those members receiving pins were: 
Kasper Aagaard, Harold Anderson. Paul 
Baeten. H. F. Barrett. Alton Benner, 
Jr.. August Bergquist. Joe Collopy, J. 
T. Crombie, Chas. Davis. Vernon De- 
Golier. Guy Eiford. James Erickson, An- 
tone Flotre was presented a 50-year 
ger, Wm. Gesse. Elwood Haggen. O. L. 
Haggen. Carl O. Hansen. Otto Hanssen, 
Aylmer Harriman. Jarle Helland. G. R. 
Hilliard, Loyal Hoffman, Marvin Hovde, 
George Johnson, Harold Johnson, May- 
nard Johnson. Leo Johnson, Victor Jones, 
S. C. Kentch. Lawrence Lingbloom, Lew 
Little, Julian McCaffery, Irving McKin- 
non, Elton Mogenson. L. R. Moore, 
George Nieshe, Emil Olsen John Pazaski, 
E. A. Rector, C. I. Rogers. Rudolph 
Salmon, C. H. Schoenberger, Fred Selene, 
E. V. Shields, Howard Shields. E. A. 
Smith, Millard E. Smith. Paul R. Smith, 
Forest Umphenour, Geo. Vanderbrink. 
Reider Webstad, Geo. Wills, Raymond 
Wilson and James Williams. 




Lyle Hiller, 7th District Board Mem- 
ber, presents a 50-year pin to Antone 
Flotre. 





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Vaughan Hammers are the result 
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They're better built and better bal- 
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they're known as the "swingin'est" 
hammers made! And a hammer's first 
and best mate is the Vaughan Super- 
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When you buy, buy Vaughan quality 
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28 



THE CARPENTER 



New NLRB Member Is Labor Veteran 



Sam Zagoria, newly-appointed mem- 
ber of the National Labor Relations 
Board, is well qualified by training 
and experience for the demanding re- 
sponsibilities of his important admin- 
istrative and quasi-judicial position. 




SAM ZAGORIA 

Zagoria has many friends in organ- 
ized labor gained through 10 years 
service on Capitol Hill as administra- 
tive assistant to Senator Clifford P. 
Case of New Jersey, earlier training as 
a newspaperman, and service on other 
official governmental agencies. When 
he was sworn into office by Supreme 
Court Justice Arthur J. Goldberg, 
many friends from organized labor at- 
tended the ceremonies. 

As a journalist, Zagoria began his 
career while in high school and Rut- 
gers University on local papers. After 
completing work for his Bachelor of 
Letters in Literature degree, he grad- 
uated to The Washington Post, where 
he covered District of Columbia ac- 
tivities and Congressional assignments 
before becoming assistant city editor, 
suburban editor and state editor. 
Meanwhile, he won a Nieman Fellow- 
ship at Harvard University, awarded 
for outstanding newspaper work, and 
in 1955 began his service with Senator 
Case. 

During his tenure with Senator Case, 
Zagoria worked closely with him on 
Congressional reform; defense contract 
disclosures and labor legislation, serv- 
ice that eminently qualified him for 
his present responsibilities on the Na- 
tional Labor Relations Board. He has 
a broadened viewpoint of labor's stake 
in our national economy through his 



service as president of the Washington 
Newspaper Guild; and is seasoned to 
the problems of management and the 
public through his participation in leg- 
islative drafting and committee work 
as assistant to Senator Case. He also 
served on the National Committee for 
a Fair Minimum Wage. 

" In appointing Zagoria to the board. 
President Johnson maintained the bi- 
partisan status of three Democrats and 
two Republicans, and the new mem- 
ber's own remarks as he took the oath 
revealed his lofty yet practical con- 
cepts of the various responsibilities 
that organized labor, management and 
government have in seeking to obtain 
full production and salary levels to 
raise living standards, at the same time 
working toward abolition of labor- 
management strife. 

"When labor and management re- 
solve their differences," Zagoria said, 
"the public gains; when labor and man- 
agement do not, the public is the loser. 
... I am looking forward particularly 
to service on the board at this time 
because it comes when this country 
seems to be entering a new industrial 
era, one in which the computer is tak- 
ing over center-stage as both a hero 
and a villain. There is no disputing 
the fact that this faceless, sexless, sani- 
tary giant of unrivaled efficiency will 
bring many good things to many more 
people, but it is also true that, as we 
are propelled into what the magazines 
call the 'Cybernated Generation', the 
union man, the organization man, in- 
deed all working men, are bound to 
grow concerned. 

"Union members are worried about 
retaining jobs. Recent events suggest 
that their leaders are facing insecurity, 
too. Managements are worried about 
competition automating sooner and 
cheaper and about how to keep ma- 
chines and men working in happy tan- 
dem. The problems are coming. 

"But President Johnson has shown 
that determination, good will and lead- 
ership can help a nation work away 
the scourges of humanity — injustice, 
ignorance, despair and disease. The 
same dedication applied to the growing 
computer crisis could result, initially, 
in new techniques for harmonious em- 
ployer-employee relationship, and, 
eventually, in new concepts about the 
role of the workers in our economy. 
. . . That we are enjoying unparalleled 
prosperity and record-low unemploy- 
ment gives us a respite within which to 
seek new solutions to employment 
security." 



You Can Be 
a Highly Paid 

CONSTRUCTION 

COST 

ESTIMATOR 



If you have the ambition to become the top 
man on the payroll — or if you are planning 
to start a successful contracting business of 
your own — we can teach you everything you 
need to know to become an expert construc- 
tion cost estimator. A journeyman carpenter 
with the equivalent of a high school education 
is well qualified to study our easy-to-understand 
home study course, Construction Cost Esti- 
mating. 

WHAT WE TEACH 

We teach you to read plans and specifications, 
take off materials, and figure the costs of ma- 
terials and labor. You prepare complete esti- 
mates from actual working drawings just like 
those you will find on every construction proj- 
ect. You learn how to arrive at the bid price 
that is correct for work in your locality based 
on your material prices and wage rates. Our 
course is self-teaching. After you study each 
lesson you correct your own work by compar- 
ing it to sample estimates which we supply. 
You don't need to send lessons back and forth ; 
therefore you can proceed at your own pace. 
When you complete this course you will know 
how to estimate the cost of all types of con- 
struction : residences, schools, churches, and in- 
dustrial, commercial, and institutional build- 
ings. Our instructions are practical and com- 
plete. We show you exactly how to proceed, 
step by step, from the time you unroll the 
plans until you actually submit your proposal. 

ACCURATE LABOR COST DATA 

The labor cost data which we supply is not 
vague and theoretical — it is correct for work 
in your locality — we leave nothing to guess" 
work. Instead of giving you a thousand rea- 
sons why it is difficult to estimate construction 
costs accurately, we teach you how to arrive 
at a competitive bid price — low enough to get 
the job — high enough to realize a profit. 

STUDY WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

You don't need to pay us one cent until you 
first satisfy yourself that our course is what 
you need and want. We will send you plans, 
specifications, estimate sheets, material and 
labor cost data, and complete instructions for 
ten days study ; then if you are not convinced 
that our course will advance you in the build- 
ng business, just return what we have sent 
you and there is no obligation whatever. If 
you decide to study our course, pay us $13.25 
monthly for three months, a total of only 
$39.75. 

Send your name and address today — we will 
do the rest. 



CONSTRUCTION COST INSTITUTE 

Dept. C-665— University Station 
Denver, Colorado S0210 



JUNE, 1965 



29 




/ joint BuiLDimifiDusrRv Pffo^ 
Apprwiti 




Local 764 Presents 
Lifetime Membership Pin 



Oregon finalists stand in front of their finished waiting stations. 




Oregon State 
Winners Announced 

THE DALLES. ORE.— The Eighth 
Annual Oregon State Carpenter Appren- 
ticeship Contest was held at "The 
Dalles." Oregon, May 1 and 2, in con- 
junction with the Lions Club Home 
Show. 




David Carpenter is congratulated by B. 
A. Cliff Sansburn of Local 1896. 



Competing apprentices were David S. 
Carpenter. L. U. 2181, Corvallis; Don L. 
Sevy, L. U. 1388, Oregon City; Allan L. 
Redding, L. U. 1065, Salem; Lars A. 
Hustoft, L. U. 1273, Eugene. 

Judges for the contest were William 
Thomas, General Contractor; Art 
Howell. Journeyman, L. U. 1896, The 
Dalles; Fred A. Drewalow, retired jour- 
neyman, L. U. 1896; the Coordinating 
Judge was General Representative Paul 
Rudd. United Brotherhood of Carpen- 
ters & Joiners of America. 

The manipulative project was designed 
to serve as a waiting station for school 
children at rural pick-up points and has 
been donated to the school board by 
the Lions Club. 

The first place winner, David S. Car- 
penter, won an all-expense trip to Al- 
buquerque to represent the State of Ore- 
gon in the Seventh Annual Western Re- 
gion Contest, August 18, 1965. 

Second place winner, Don Sevy, will 
serve as an alternate to the Western 
Region Contest and will receive a 
$50.00 United States Savings Bond. 

All contestants received Certificates of 
Awards on participation. 



New Jersey State Council Holds Conference at Rutgers 




NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J.— The New Jersey State Council recently held a con- 
ference at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, covering important matters as to 
Maintenance by Contract and the Davis-Bacon Act. 

Special guests were Second General Vice President William Sidell and Research 
Director D. D. Danielson. Also present were: George Wallish, secretary-treasurer, 
Pennsylvania State Council; Raymond Ginnetti, general representative; Raleigh 
Rajoppi, president of the New Jersey State Council; James Moss, secretary-treasurer 
of the N. J. State Council; and Professor Levine of Rutgers University. 



SHREVEPORT, LA.— At a recent 
meeting of Local 764 a number of the 
old-timers gathered to see J. D. Edmia- 
ston receive his lifetime membership pin. 
Edmiaston, born in 1886, joined the 
Brotherhood in 1919. 

The presentation to Brother Edmiaston 
was made by A. H. Williams, financial 
secretary of Local 764. 

First 50- Year Pin 
Given by Local 2212 



"*5fi 3 H 



EAST ORANGE, N. J.— Fred Meis- 
nest was recently presented a 50-year pin 
by Local 2212 of East Orange. He is 
the first and only pensioner in the local 
and the first 50-year member. 

He was initiated into Local 306, New- 
ark, N. J. in 1914, and laid all types of 
intricate wood floors. Fred transferred 
into Local 2212 as a charter member in 
1939, and has been warden since 1943. 

At the presentation were, from left: 
James P. Patterson, business represent- 
ative of Local 2212; Fred Meisnest, and 
Robert M. Voung, president. 

Vice President's 
History Note 

WASHINGTON, D. C— Vice Presi- 
dent Humphrey told a labor audience 
recently that in speaking to a business 
group he commended them on reports 
that they were studying history. 

"I told them that it was fine to read 
ancient history," the Vice President said, 
"but they didn't have to vote it." 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



Five Sons, All Members of Local 385 

1 ~* T 




NEW YORK CITY, N. Y. — Local 385 has the second father-and-five-sons combi- 
nation to come to our attention. From the left: Brother Baldomero Vellon and sons 
— Manuel, 43; Andres, 42; Bernadino, 41; Alexander, 33 and Alberto, 29. 

Local 1811 Awards 25- Year Pins 




MONROE, La. — Local 1811 presented pins to the following: front row, from the 
left: T. L. Rabalais, James I. Graves and Prentice C. Gaston. Second row: O. L. 
Blazier, Jesse O. Anding, Murray Anderson and D. K. Aldridge. Standing are: H. Y. 
Johnson, Ernest Bade and W. A. Dunn. 

Also eligible for a pin although not present were: Jim Anding, M. J. Boyett, Charles 
N. Brazzell, L. W. Bridges, A. F. Cooper, B. F. Garrett, W. L. Jinks, L. J. Hayden, 
J. P. Lincecum, W. F. O'Neal, D. W. Osbon and Fred Roberts. The three remaining 
charter members of Local 1811 are Ernest Bade, W. A. Dunn and Alex Sikes. 

John Swetkovich Honored by Local 1164 




BROOKLYN, N. Y. — At the quarterly meeting of Local 1164, the officers and 
members presented a watch to John Swetkovich, who has been a business represent- 
ative for the local for 30 years. On hand for the presentation was Conrad Olsen, first 
vice president of the New York City District Council. 

Participating in the ceremony were: front row, from the left: Joe Henneberger, 
conductor; Eric Johnson, vice president; Conrad Olsen, 1st vice president of the 
New York City District Council; John Swetkovich, business representative and finan- 
cial secretary; and Anthony Spilar, president and business representative. Top row: 
Ernest Svara, trustee; Robert Willets, trustee; Erich Willkens, trustee; Alex Honzer, 
delegate to the New York City District Council; and Michael Braito, warden. 



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163 p., 463 II., covering concrete work, form build- 
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CARPENTRY.— HaB 307 p. 767 II., covering 
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CARPENTER'S TOOLS.— Covers sharpening and 
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BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— Has 380 
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THE FIRST LEAVES.— Poetry. Only $1.50. 
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_Zip- 




JUNE, 1965 



31 



Journeyman of Tomorrow 

Continued from l'afic 9 

In place of a final examination, a 

portion of the last period is set aside 
for the students to fill in a two-page 
questionnaire which asks them to indi- 
cate their relative interest in the 10 
topics covered and the various films 
shown, also whether they found the 
course "very worthwhile," "worth- 
while" or "a waste of time," whether 
they think it will make them better 
union members and to write any com- 
ments they wish to make. 

These questionnaires are unsigned, 
and the students can — and do — speak 
their minds freely. It should therefore 
be significant that almost 40 per cent 
of all the responses to date describe 
the classes as "very worthwhile" and 
almost all the rest as "worthwhile." 
Only six out of each 100 have labeled 
the classes "a waste of time." 

Over 95 per cent have answered 
affirmatively the question, "Do you 
think these classes have given you a 
better understanding of the trade and 
of the union, and will make you a 
better member?" 

Of course, "You can't win 'em all," 
and some of the written comments are 
gripes, such as: 

"I have come to be an apprentice, 
not a union man. I can learn much 
more at school. I missed a lot of 
important things because of these 
meetings." . . . "Topics were slanted 
too much toward the Union. I feel 
both sides of the question should be 
given." "I have too many things to 
do on nights like Tuesday. I did not 
like the union class." 

But by far the largest number of 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Audel. Theo. & Co 39 

Belsaw Machinery Co. 

(Sharp-All) 31 

Chicago Technical College ... 37 

Construction Cost Institute ... 29 

Eliason Stair Gauge Co 28 

Estwing Mfg. Co 23 

Foley Mfg. Co 25 

Hydrolevel 39 

Line Holder 34 

Miller Sewer Rod Co 28 

Siegele, H. H 31 

Skil Corp . 16 

Stanley Works Back Cover 

Technical Home Study 

(Locksmithing) 33 

Vaughan & Bushnell Mfg. Co. 28 



comments are approving, and many 
sound almost embarrassingly like pat- 
ent medicine testimonials, as in these 
examples: 

"In my opinion, all members should 
have such educational classes (includ- 
ing journeymen.)" . . . "It answers 
questions that you would never know 
about your union. It gives a better 
feeling about the union." . . . "Very, 
very informative." . . . "Learned some 
things I never knew about the union." 
. . . "Just that I learned a great ileal 
about our union and unions in general 
and that I enjoyed the class." . . . 
"Generally a very excellent course, 
seemed to pack a good deal of diverse 
information into 10 weeks." . . . "Ex- 
cellent — should be required of all ap- 
prentices." ... "I thought it was very 
well conveyed. My only regret is that 
I missed a couple of them." ... "I 
believe every young member should 
go through this course, because it is 
really worthwhile and very educa- 
tional." 

The first year of the program has 
been one of shaking down, testing 
and discarding. Some topics and films 
have been changed. But the course of 
study is not frozen into a pattern; it 
retains a current events quality, in that 
the cases and examples cited change as 
time and events progress; newspaper 
clippings, magazine articles, official 
AFL-CIO reprints and pamphlets and 
similar material of a timely sort is used 
wherever appropriate. 

Seasonal Changes 

The content of some sessions simi- 
larly changes to suit the season, so that 
the subject matter and stress of the 
political education session was differ- 
ent just before the 1964 Presidential 
election than in the most recent one, 
which focused on Congress and the 
California State Legislature. Again, as 
the District Council prepares for its 
contract negotiations at midyear, the 
next discussion on the Brotherhood 
and its subordinate bodies will deal 
specifically with the content and me- 
chanics of this year's bargaining. 

Now the Bay Counties District 
Council of Carpenters is planning its 
next moves. The first will be to re- 
quire attendance at the classes by 
younger journeymen coming into the 
district from other areas. Also in pros- 
pect are voluntary classes, or programs 
in conjunction with regular union 
meetings, to bring some of the back- 
ground topics and, perhaps, up-to-the- 
minute briefings on current develop- 



ments and problems to the general 
membership. 

What will be the long-term results 
of this ambitious excursion into for- 
mal, compulsory union instruction for 
the District Council's younger and 
new members? Bartalini gave the an- 
swer to that one when the program 
was set up: "Ask me in five years, 
maybe. If we see the results in better 
meeting attendance, more participation 
in activities, a better attitude on the 
part of the younger members, then we'll 
know we've been successful." 

Hopes for Future 

Meanwhile, as the ranks of the 
union fill up increasingly with mem- 
bers of the first generation in Ameri- 
can history to grow up without 
personal experience of a major war 
or major depression, who don't know 
that we didn't always "have it this 
good," there is no immediate, certain 
answer to the question, what good does 
it do to tell them, for example, that 
as recently as 1942 in this area, a 
journeyman carpenter's wage was 
$10 a day as against today's combined 
wages and fringes of $41.72 a day? 

The important thing is that before 
this, nobody even bothered to tell 
them; now, at least, they are being 
told. 



HOME STUDY COURSE 

Answers to Problems, Pages 20-21 

Multiplication: (1) 184; (2) 
2247; (3) 456; (4) 5412; (5) 
4508; (6) 6422; (7) 23994; (8) 
92530; (9) 23287; (10) 67452; 

(11) 61512; (12) 177784; (13) 
442736: (14) 542842; (15) 
260494; (16) 577424; (17) 
978600; (18) 7128780; (19) 
186892375; (20) 4450624; (21) 
2449852; (22) 290857216; (23) 
914303; (24) 796800; (25) 
444773; (26) 289204; (27) 
7515835; (28) 229886; (29) 
76988; (30) 152250; (31) 28261; 
(32) 5058430. 

Review Problems: (1) 224; (2) 
2083; (3) 9309; (4) 6306; (5) 
9233; (6) 29; (7) 139; (8) 3967; 
(9) 1576; (10) 2298; (11) 10635; 

(12) 3332; (13) 6582; (14) 501; 
(15) 8811; (16) 1250; (17) 1076; 
(18) 6236; (19) 10000; (20) 7467. 

EDITOR'S NOTE: Please do not send 
answers to Home Study Course prob- 
lems to the International Office in Wash- 
ington. These problems are tor training 
and practice and are not "for the 
record." 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



Local 1913 Honors 123 Members 



VAN NUYS, CALIF.— On Friday 
night, February 26, Carpenters Local 
1913 held a 25-year and 50-year mem- 
bership awards ceremony to present 126 
of its members with pins. Of these, two 
men, Meyer Katz and James Casey, re- 
ceived their gold pin with the Carpenter's 
emplem for 50 years or more continuous 
membership. Mrs. Joseph Wagner, 
widow of the late Joseph Wagner, re- 
ceived a scroll of appreciation for Brother 
Wagner for 50 years membership in the 
Brotherhood and Mrs. Carl Guadagno, 
widow of the late Carl Guadagno, re- 
ceived a 25-year pin for her husband's 
long membership in the Brotherhood. 
Silver pins were presented to: 

Albert C. Abel, Frank A. Alain, C. 
W. Allen, Lloyd J. Allen, Geo. W. Ander- 
son, William Anderson, Marvin L. At- 
kinson, Edson Avery, Joseph W. Bannon, 
Peter Berkowitz, George R. Billups, E. L. 
Blosser, Frank E. Boyce, Joseph Branca, 
William P. Brenton. R. E. Brumfield. 
Leo R. Burton. Ora Byers, Dante Car- 
nesciali, Raymond Caron, Max Cobmand, 
James T. Coffie, Howard P. Cooper, 
Frank Councilman, Homer D. Cox, 
Louis J. Cox, William L. Cumpston, 
John F. Dahlstrom, B. F. Dirnberger, 
Marvin H. Doggett, Charles Dyer, Ken- 
neth Edwards, Grover D. Endsley. Ernest 
R. Erickson, Estie L. Feasel, Julius Ferk- 
ingstad, Leslie M. Flinn, Hugh I. Free- 
man, Frank J. Fuller, Marcus D. Gay, 
James Goeschl, Harry Goldsberry, Leon- 
ard Gustafson, Ben G. Habeger, Walter 



A. Hachtel, Charles W. Haigh, Edward 
Hampton, E. C. Handloser, Robert E. 
Harris, Earl C. Harrison, James Harrison, 
Newt R. Heflin, Earl A. Hein, F. J. 
Henson, Frank V. Hill, N. F. Hillyer, 
A. L. Hoenish, Bennie HofF, Frank Ho- 
lan, A. B. Holstrom, Oscar A. Huebner, 
Emerson E. Hughes, J. F. Hughes, Floyd 
L. Hursh, Harvey Jenkins, Harold Johns, 
Pete Kaldhusdal. John Kendall, H. W. 
Knox. Carl Krohn, Charles E. La Dam, 
.Pqul F. Landis, Laurits Larsen, J. A. 
Lavigne, Ernest Lidberg, Oscar Lind- 
quist, W. L. Logan. L. E. Long, Henry 
J. Maag III, N. F. Markgren, H. E. 
Marks, Samuel Martin, Louis A. Mason, 
Frank H. McCown, Clarence McElravy, 
Ernest S. Moore, Max Moscrip, F. C. 
Muir. Edwin Nelson, Harry E. Nelson, 
David Newquist, William Nilsson. Matt 
Nordahl, Axel Nordstrom, Eric C. Nor- 
ris, Carl Novak. Gust H. Olson Olaf 
N. Ottoson, A. G. Overall, Joe Pacal, 
J. E. Peterson, W. A. Richter. Frank 
Rothstein, Walter S. Saigren, C. M. Samp- 
son, Raymond E. Seal, Leroy Shuey, Neal 
W. Spencer, C. Stollenwerk, Chris 
Strunk. Herb Sundquist, Nels S. Swan- 
son, Rudolph Swedberg, Gil Travel- 
ler, Joseph C. Vandine, Edwin Vanselow, 
Glenn Vausbinder, Abe Walovitch, Ben 
M. Warren, James O. Wash, Erwin 
Weber, Emil Wedman, Ward B. Wilson 
and John Zubek. 

Bros. John L. Cox and John Swank, 
both of Van Nuys, still members of 1913, 
received 50-year pins quite some time ago. 



Hocker Receives 50- Year 
Pin from Local 287 



First Pension Checks in Rhode Island 



PROVIDENCE, R. I.— The Provi- 
dence, Pawtucket and Central Falls Dis- 
trict Council recently held an Old Timer's 
Night, at which the first pension checks 
of the Rhode Island Carpenter's Pension 
Fund were distributed. 



A total of 81 checks were distributed 
to certain members whose ages ranged 
from 65 to 93 years, and whose member- 
ship ranged from 32 to 63 years. The 
pension paid amounts up to $25 per 
month on a quarterly basis. 




The group receiving pension checks consisted of, from the left: George A. Turgeon, 
chairman of the Board of Trustees; Robert E. Hayes, president of the Council and 
a trustee; Jerome J. Kearney, business representative and trustee; Fred Young, a 50- 
year member in Local 94; William J. Sheehan, attorney for the Fund, and Leroy K. 
Bartlett, secretary-treasurer of the Fund. 




HARRISBURG, PA.— Local 287 has 
presented Brother William H. Hocker 
with a 50-year pin. He has served as an 
officer and has been on the executive 
board of Local 287 since 1939. He has 
been a delegate to the Keystone District 
Council of Carpenters, since it was 
founded. The pin was presented by Rob- 
ert H. Getz, business representative. 



You'll Like Being a 
SKILLED 

LOCKSMITH 



you'll EARN MORE, LIVE BETTER 
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You'll enjoy your work as a Lock- 
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LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE 
Div. of Technical Home Study Schools 
Dept. 118-065. Little Falls, N. J. 



I V 



"$642' 
WHILE 

LEARN- 
ING' 

Now 
average 
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my spare time. 
With the help of 
your instruction, 
anyone can mas- 
ter the course 
with ease." 
R. Ted GirTord 
Robinson. 111. 







LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE, Dept. 118-065, 
Little Falls, New Jersey Est. 1948 

Please send FREE illustrated Rook — "Your Big Op- 
portunities in Locksmithing, ' ' complete Equipment 
folder and sample lesson pages — FREE of all obli- 
gation — (no salesman will call). 

Name 

(Please Trint) 

Address 

City State Zip 



JUNE, 1965 



33 





MM(fQ» 



?000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who. in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 



AIR FORCE MEDAL— Apprentice Ger- 
ald Burkhart is a member of Local 418 in 
Greeley, Colo. He is also a member of 
the Greeley Air National Guard. Re- 
cently. Burkhart was presented the USAF 
Airman's Medal by the Governor of 
Colorado, John A. Love. 

The citation accompanying the award 
reads: 

"Airman Second Class Gerald W. 
Burkhart distinguished himself by hero- 
ism, voluntarily risking his life at Greeley 
Air National Guard Station on 11 July 
1964. On that date Airman Burkhart 
rescued another airman who had become 
unconscious while working on an antenna 
pole approximately 62 feet above the 
ground. 

"At any time during his descent from 
the pole with the unconscious airman, 
but particularly when at a cross arm. he 
removed his safety belt. Airman Burk- 
hart could have fallen to the ground 
sustaining grievous injury or possible 
death. By his courageous action and 
humanitarian regard for his fellow man, 




Gov. Love congratulates Burkhart 

Airman Burkhart has reflected great 
credit upon himself and the United States 
Air Force." 

Burkhart is a member of the 138th 
Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron, 
the only fulltime ANG radar unit in the 
Sioux City Air Defense Sector. Burkhart 
functions as a specialist in the Squadron's 
Telephone Maintenance Section. 




LINE 
HOLDER 




$ 1 

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Nail on wall 
when working 
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The fastest, quickest 
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LINE HOLDER 
without line 
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LINE HOLDER 
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length of 103# 
test nylon twine 
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Sold on money back guarantee. Patent pend- 
ing, made in U. S. A. Invented by member 
of Carpenters Union, Local 226, Portland, 
Oregon. 

HOW TO ORDER. Send your name 
and address, check or money order 
and we will ship postpaid. 

LINE HOLDER 
P. O. Box 42086, Portland, Oregon 




Fits conveniently 
in ruler pocket 



TAKE SAFETY ON 
YOUR SUMMER VACATION 



Local 189 Honors Veteran Carpenters 




QUINCY, ILL. — Local 189 of Quincy has honored 15 of its members for long years in the craft. At the celebration dinner, 
pins were presented by W. E. (Duff) Corbin, international representative and president of the Illinois State Council (third from 
left in back row, above). Those receiving pins were, from the left, front row: Leopold Zwick, Carl Arp, Ray Middendorf, Os- 
car Trine, Walt Kleynsteuber, Fred Koenig, Kit Hudson and Carl Herman; back row — Ray Eickleschulte, Bob Waterkoette, 
Corbin, Herb Rakers, Clarence Upschulte, Ray Brinkman and Bernard and Herman Kemner. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 




L.U. NO. 13, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Donohue. John 
Komen, Jacob 
La Guardina, Tony 
Nierman, George 
Solberg, Gust 
Valle, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 49, 
LOWELL, MASS. 

Voter, Clarence, E. 

L.U. NO. 53, 

WHITE PLAINS, N. Y. 

Englund, Carl 

L.U. NO. 54, 
BERWYN, ILL. 

Pravda, Joseph 
Strnad, Louis 

L.U. NO. 55, 
DENVER, COLO. 

Jones, Lewis 

L.U. NO. 59, 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Eastridge, Carl 
Petrillo, Peter 
Pfeiffer, Fred 
Reinhart, Guy 

L.U. NO. 61, 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Allen, Frank H. 
Allen, Lester C. 
Nihlean. Robert 
Watt, Robert 

L.U. NO. 62, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Klein, George, Sr. 
Stark, Arthur 

L.U. NO. 141, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Ellison, Shelton E. 
Turnquest, Albert 

L.U. NO. 142, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

George, Joseph P. 

L.U. NO. 182, 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Bebenroth, Hugh 
Buehl, Louis 
Crisboi, George 
Darwal, Charles 
Evans, Glenn 
Hubinak, John 
Haller, Fred 
Horn, Henry 
Mayefhofifer, Martin 
Santora, Louis 
Strauss, Henry 
Tuller, John 

L.U. NO. 184, 
SALT LAKE CITY, 
UTAH 

Decker, Allen 
Lehmer, Charles C. 
Madsen, Robert W. 
Schlegel, Otto 

L.U. NO. 186, 

STEUBENVILLE, 

OHIO 

Tice, Harold O. 

L.U. NO. 242, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Kline, Ransome R. 
Poirot, Elmer 



L.U. NO. 246 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Darmstadt, August 
Swift, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 257, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Hansen, Christian 
Probst, John 
Samuels, Arthur ., 

L.U. NO. 261, 
SCRANTON, PA. 

Martin, Louis 
Pfeiffer, C. L. 

L.U. NO. 272, 
CHICAGO HTS., ILL. 

Pettinga, George 
Schichner, Fred 
Swanson, Edwin 

L.U. NO 278, 
WATERTOWN, N. Y. 

Ross, Ray 

L.U. NO. 281, 
BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 

Beagle, William 

L.U. NO. 283, 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Daniels, Riley 

L.U. NO. 314, 
MADISON, WIS. 

Carlson, Andrew 
Manteufel, Charles 
Meyer, Harvey V. 

L.U. NO. 341, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Chmielewski, Anton 
Kurek, Joseph 
Safjan, Willie 

L.U. NO. 350, 
NEW ROCHELLE, 

N. Y. 

Nykwest, Carl 
Pace, Anthony, Sr. 

L.U. NO. 359, 
PHILDELPHIA, PA. 

Chambers, Robert 
McLane, Robert C. 

L.U. NO. 393, 
CAMDEN, N. J. 

Alessi, Joseph 
Beidler, Joseph 
Dauksys, William 
Fritz, Harold 
Hampton, Albert 
Hopen, Jens 
Jones, Charles 
Kelley, William P. 
Neissner, Frederick 
Nolan, Herbert 
Rudolph, Harry 
Scholund, Raymond 
Strobel, Rinehart 
Thornbarrow, G. A. 
Warner, William 
Wick, Frank 

L.U. NO. 430, 
WILKINBERG, PA. 

Dreisbach, R. A. 

L.U. NO. 512, 

ANN ARBOR, MICH. 

Clinansmith, C. W. 
Corwin, Cassius E. 
Radenbaugh, Paul 
Simpson, W. L. 



L.U. NO. 517, 
PORTLAND, ME. 

Burke, William 
Leighton, Ralph 
Lord, Daniel 
Nelsen, Carl 
Pollard, Russell 
Ward, John F. 

L.U. NO. 584 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Dubose, Charles W. 

L.U. NO. 665, 
AMARILLO, TEXAS 

Cox, Kenneth L. 
Evans, C. A. 
Goodman, Lester E. 

L.U. NO. 721, 
LOS ANGELES, 
CALIF. 

Bobby, Arthur 
DeLeon, Pedro 
Hardy, Richard 
Koniezcny, John 
Lindskog, S. J. 
Metzger, Heinrich 
Rodriquez, Alfred 

L.U. NO. 735, 
MANSFIELD, OHIO 

Stoller, Howard 

L.U. NO. 743, 

BAKERSFIELD, 

CALIF. 

Curry, Willie 
Elliott, J. C. 
Holman, Tom 
Hood, B. W. 
Moon, George E. 
Skidmore, Luther O. 
Young, Virgil 

L.U. NO. 764, 
SHREVEPORT, LA. 

Cain, Marvin E. 
Jackson, Larry Keith 
Murray. J. C. 
Parham, Carrell 

L.U. NO. 787, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Zaluk, Frank 

L.U. NO. 791, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Anderson, Hilding 
Begnocke, Joseph 
Doran, Elmer 
Regevig, Anton 
Tavares, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 860, 

FRAMINGHAM, 

MASS. 

Hand, Edward 
Merrill, Egbert 

L.U. NO. 942, 

FORT SCOTT, KANS. 

Albee, C. U. 
Duncan, George L. 
Wallace, John L. 

L.U. NO. 950, 
LYNBROOK, N. Y. 

Pettit, John Fox 

L.U. NO. 1065, 
SALEM, ORE. 

Kelly, James C. 



L.U. NO. 1074, 
EAU CLAIRE, WIS. 

Barry, Linus 
Franzen, Joseph 
Smalley, Elmer 

L.U. NO. 1098, 
BATON ROUGE, LA. 

Whitehead, Elliot 
Ray, Glen B. 

L.U. NO. 1108, 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Bajgrowicz, John 
Birch, Emil 
Carlson, Herbert E. 
Davidson, Wayne 
Duplay, Frank 
Good, Joseph 
Gustafson, Gust 
Kason, John 
Keisel, Fred 
Lade, Lawrence 
Lutz Albert 
Meder, Elmer 
Moilov, Paul 
Svec, Steve 
Wolf, George 

L.U. NO. 1162, 
FOREST HILLS, N. Y. 

Busewitch, Arsen 

L.U. NO. 1292, 
HUNTINGTON 
STATION, N. Y. 

Honohan, Arthur 
Velsor, Herbert 

L.U. NO. 1301, 
MONROE, MICH. 

Berns, Karl 

L.U. NO. 1367, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Jeske, Harold 

L.U. NO. 1407, 
WILMINGTON, 
CALIF. 

Varney, Clarence 

L.U. NO. 1423, 
CORPUS CHRISTI, 
TEX. 

Dillon, P. P. 

L.U. NO. 1433, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Acord, George 
Burr, L. H. 
Larsen, Oscar A. 

L.U. NO. 1437, 
COMPTON, CALIF. 

Auringer. Burton L. 
Britten, Ben H. 
Eli, Jessee L. 
Newton, Linn S. 
Thorley, Wm. Stewart 
Wagner, Kurt H. 

L.U. NO. 1449, 
LANSING, MICH. 

Reeve, Guy 

L.U. NO. 1497, 
EAST LOS ANGELES, 
CALIF. 

Brand, Glennon 
Johnston, T. H. 



L.U. NO. 1599, 
REDDING, CALIF. 

Forward, Arthur 

L.U. NO. 1616, 

NASHUA, N. H. 
Dube, Albert 
Poulin, Edward 
Renard, Henry 
Therreault, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 1752, 
POMONA, CALIF. 

Dawson. J. J. 
Eisenoch, John 
Kelley, Howard 

L.U. NO. 1764, 
MARION, VA. 

Mason, Charles A 
Vernon, Vance 

L.U. NO. 1822 
FORT WORTH, TEX. 

Carlson, C. G. 

L.U. NO. 1846, 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Austin, William B. 
Brooks, J. T. 
Crow, A. B. 
DeBautte, Clarence 
Guillot, Samuel 
Heide, Oliver J. 
Landry, Walter Paul 

L.U. NO. 1922, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Carither, Clint 
Golden, John H. 
Mueller, Andrew 

L.U. NO. 1925, 
COLUMBIA, MO. 

Dowell, John W. 

L.U. NO. 1978, 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 

Brennan, George 
Cummings, Lawrence 
Hayhurst, John, Sr. 
Herbert. George, Sr. 
Horrigan, Dennis 
Kennerdell, John 
Kirrmann, John 
Nostrand, Francis 
Renzi, Luke 
Russell. Andrew 

L.U. NO. 2027, 
RAPID CITY, S. DAK. 

Lyke, Leon 
Surface. Lafe 

L.U. NO. 2046, 
MARTINEZ, CALIF. 

Barker, George T. 
Ellis, George 
Gales, Luther 
Rolling, Ray 
Pierce, Lionel 
Sodder, Ivan 

L.U. NO. 2070, 
ROANOKE, VA. 

Eyler, C. E., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 2288, 
LOS ANGELES, 
CALIF. 

Hall. Carey J. 
Padilla, David R. 





jmimm 



By FRED GOETZ 



Raiders may write to Brother Goetz at 0216 S.W. Iowa Street, Portland. Ore. 97201 



The Black Bandit 




Itchy-fingered scattergunners who want 
to keep "Old Betsy" working 'til the ar- 
rival of the fall bird-hunting season, can 
do just that with an occasional sortie 
after the black bandit of the cornfield: 
THE CROW. 

Discounting table-fare qualities, the 
crow is, nevertheless, a worthy target. 
Any scattergunner who has hunted them 
will vouch for this. They are fast, prob- 
ably the most intelligent of all our wild 
wingsters, and extremely gun shy. Hunt- 
ing them might well be compared to 
hunting the speedy dove — duck-size. 

Standard requirements are crow calls 
and fraudulent-owl decoys. Unless you've 
followed this speedster in your sights, 
as he dives jet-like toward your decoy, 
you cannot fully appreciate this enthus- 
iasm. Blackie has been clocked at speeds 
to 30 miles per hour. 

A proven shotgun for crows is a 12- 
gauge, loaded with high brass. No. 6's. 
One must proceed with extreme caution, 
entirely under cover, for the crow has 
incredible powers of perception toward 
hunters and binocular-like eyesight. 

You should have no trouble getting 
permission to hunt crows on private 
lands. Most farmers will give you their 
permission. 

Just for kicks, and a change of pace, 



try your hand at crow hunting this sum- 
mer. While you're about it. take a 
youngster with you. Believe me, there's 
no better way to prepare him (or her) 
for their first game-bird hunt this fall. 

A Family Catch 

Most youngsters have a pure-and-sim- 
ple objective in pursuing the finny game- 
sters: "They fish for fishing sake, not, 
particularly, to catch the big one." They 
are usually content, thrilled to pieces, to 
yank out anything in sight that wiggles — 
regardless of the species or size. 

A family who'll go along with this 
philosophy is Mr. and Mrs. N. Yar- 
brough of Phoenix, Ariz. Nathan Yar- 
brough is a member of Local 1089, Phoe- 
nix. The following photo depicts the 
Yarbrough's grandsons, Kerry (right) and 




Glenn and Kerry with Largemouih 

Glenn, with a stringer of chunky bass, a 
family catch that the lads shared in. 

The chunky largemouth came from 
Roosevelt Lake and were caught on 
Bomber and Hellbender lures. They em- 
ployed the slowtroll method during a pe- 
riod of low water. 



Tips From The Creel 

. . . All this guff about matching color 
of leader to color of stream bottom, 
overhanging brush, sky, etc., is hogwash. 
A light-hued, transparent line or leader 
is as close as anyone can get to invis- 
ability. 

... If you've a two-piece fly-rod, cast- 
ing, spin, or otherwise, take it apart and 
keep it apart when not in use. Before 
assembling it. rub a little of the oil from 
the crease of your nose on the ferrule. 
This will prevent it from sticking. 

. . . Don't saddle your youngsters with 
complicated fishing equipment. If you 
can't savvy it yourself, and teach them 
to savvy it, they are handicapped. I've 
seen some very eager neophyte anglers 
go hike warm on the gentle art after re- 
peatingly snarling their equipment. We've 
made it a point to indoctrinate the young- 
sters with dry-land casting lessons, knot 
tying, etc., before sauntering out to lake, 
stream or saltchuck. 

. . . When I'm drift fishing from the 
bank and constantly bouncing the stream 
bottom with lure or bait. I've found it a 
good idea to periodically break off about 
six feet of the line closest to the hook. 
This length of line bears the most wear. 
Don't lose the lunker of the day, maybe 
a lifetime, because of a frayed line. 

12-Pound Walleye 

Ed Muellerleile of 1836 Center St. N„ 
Mankato, Minn., joined the Carpenters' 
Union in 1936; helped organize a local. 
He's now 73 years of age and has re- 
tired from Local 1464, Mankato. 

He writes: 

"Dear Fred: 

"I may be 73 years young but I'm still 
as active as a youngster when it comes 
to my favorite pastime — fishing. I fish 
the year around and particularly want 
to call attention to the wonderful winter 
fishing at Big Stone Lake. I had my 
share of finsters from this lucrative body 
of water last winter and was fortunate 
enough to catch a lunker walleye that 
tipped the scales at 12 pounds." 

As far as our records go, Brother 
Muellerleile's 12 pounder is a record 
Minnesota walleye for these columns. 

The Good Old Days 

Andy Cornwall of Duluth, Minn., un- 
covered a tattered, moth-eaten hunt-and- 
fish license among a cache of old papers. 
It proclaimed: 

"For the sum of 25 cents, the license 
holder is entitled to hunt, catch deer, 
elk, caribou and moose in the state of 
Minnesota." 

Other benefits accorded by the license 
holder allowed for: 

"Pike, red horse, suckers, etc., to be 
speared or caught with hook in any man- 
ner at any time. No person shall take, 
or kill, to exceed 25 birds or more than 
50 fish in any one day." 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



The First Fish 

Vance L. van den Driessche of Long- 
view, Wash., a member of Local 1707, 
says his youngsters will never forget the 
day they caught their first fish — silver 
trout from Lake Merwin, an impound- 
ment on the north fork of the Lewis, a 
river that empties into the Columbia. 

"Even if one should forget it, the 
other will remember," says Vance, "be- 
cause they both caught No. 1 at the same 
time." 

The photo below of the Driessche 
youngsters — with their first fish — records 
the memorable occasion. 




Both caught their first fish. 



Canadian Report 

Continued from Page 19 

year as has sometimes been sug- 
gested." 

In short, unionized industries pay 
better wages but very often the non- 
unionized industries are the ones that 
push up prices. 

New Deal in 
Home Construction 

The old adage that the longest way 
round is the shortest way home may 
have some validity when applied to 
the "new deal" agreement signed by 
the Toronto building trades covering 
residential construction. 

House-building has been the orphan 
in union organization in the fast- 
growing Metro Toronto area. A num- 
ber of organizing drives and strikes 
dented the "unorganized front" but 
no more. 

Now an agreement between 12 
building and construction trades un- 
ions with one of the largest builders, 
Piggott Construction, should pave the 
way for organized general contrac- 
tors to get a bigger share of the resi- 
dential building market. 




These 

FREE BLUE PRINTS 

have started thousands toward 

BETTER PAY AND PROMOTION 



That's right! In all fifty states, men who 
sent for these free blue prints are today 
enjoying big success as foremen, superin- 
tendents and building contractors. They've 
landed these higher-paying jobs because they 
learned to read blue prints and mastered 
the practical details of construction. Now 
CTC home-study training in building offers 
you the same money-making opportunity. 

LEARN IN YOUR SPARE TIME 

As you know, the ability to read blue prints 
completely and accurately determines to a 
great exten* how far you can go in building. 
What's more, you can learn plan reading 
simply and easily with the Chicago Tech 
system of spare-time training in your own 
home. You also learn all phases of building, 
prepare yourself to run the job from start 
to finish. 



CASH IN ON YOUR EXPERIENCE 

For over 61 years, building tradesmen and 
beginners alike have won higher pay with 
the knowledge gained from Chicago Tech's 
program in blue print reading, estimating, 
foremanship and contracting. Through step- 
by-step instruction, using actual blue prints 
and real specifications of modern, up-to-date 
buildings, you get a practical working 
knowledge of every building detail — a 
thorough understanding of every craft. And 
as a carpenter or apprentice, you already 
have valuable experience that may let you 
move up to foreman even before you com- 
plete your training. 

Don't waste a single day. Start preparing 
right now to take over a better job, increase 
your paycheck and command greater respect 
as the "boss" on the job. Find out about 
Chicago Tech's get-ahead training in build- 
ing. Send for your free blue prints and trial 
lesson — today! 



CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

TECH BLDG., 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



FREE 

BLUE PRINTS 

AND 
TRIAL LESSON 

Send for your free trial lesson 
now. You'll agree that this 
training is simple yet practical — ■ 
your surest way to promotion 
and increased income in build- 
ing. 

MAIL COUPON TODAY 



Chicago Technical College 

G-137 Tech Building, 2000 So. Michigan Ave. 

Chicago 16, Illinois 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet: "How to Read 
Blue Prints" with information about how I can train 
at home. 



Name. 



-Age_ 



Address— 
City 



_Zone State- 



Occupation. 



JUNE, 1965 



37 



Western Region 
Contest Planning 

\1 HI QUERQUE N. M.— The Plan- 
ning Committee for the Seventh Annual 
Western Region Carpenters and Mill- 
Cabinel Apprenticeship Contest met in 
Albuquerque, N. M., recently to finalize 
plans for the contest which is to be held 
there August 18-21. 

The Western Region Contest is jointly 
sponsored by the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters, Employer Associations in co- 
operation with the National Wood Coun- 
cil and related industries. 

There will be contestants representing 
the Province of British Columbia and the 
Stales of Washington. Oregon. California. 
Arizona. New Mexico. Nevada and Utah 
participating. It is also expected that the 
Province of Alberta will be represented 
and possibly the State of Kansas. 

The contest consists of two parts, a 
four-hour written test based upon the 
Apprenticeship Manuals prepared by the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and an 
eight-hour manipulative project. 

Both the written test and the manipula- 
tive project plans are developed by the 
Brotherhood Education Committee and 
are kept a secret from all contestants and 
committeemen until the day of the con- 
test. 

The contest will be held in the Wind- 
rock Shopping Center Mall where, it is 
estimated. 100.000 people will have the 
opportunity to watch the contestants per- 
form. 




Seated, left to right: Rodell Bloomfield, 
Chairman, New Mexico State Appren- 
ticeship Committee, and Alva Coats, Co- 
Chairman, Western Region Committee. 

Standing, left to right: Charles Gehring, 
Representative of the National Lumber 
Council, and Paul Rudd, Secretary, West- 
ern Region Contest Committee. 

Birchard Honored 

General President Hutcheson recently 
acknowledged the receipt of a $50.00 do- 
nation from Ross Gosnell, financial sec- 
retary of Local 161, Kenosha, Wis., for 
our Lakeland Home. The donation was 
given in the name of Brother Leland 
Birchard. As a tribute to Brother Birch- 
ard, his name will be placed on one of 
the benches at the Lakeland Home. 



NEWS 



Edward T. Mover of Local Union 946. Los Angeles, Calif., arrived at the 
Home April I, 1965. 

John E. Bush of Local Union 15, Hackcnsack, N. J., arrived at the Home 
April 12. 1965. 

Herman Bieling of Local Union 1062, Santa Barbara. Calif., arrived at the 
Home April 15, 1965. 

Samuel Samuelson of Local Union 366. New York. N. Y., arrived at the 
Home April 27. 1965. 

Robert O. (handler. Local Union 1905. Central Florida, withdrew from 
the Home April 19. 1965. 

William B. McCord of Local Union 185, St. Louis. Mo., passed away 
April 7, 1965, and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

James J. Farley of Local Union 985. Gary. Ind.. passed away April 9, 1965. 
and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Union Members Who Visited the Home during April 

W. K. Zehner, L.U. 109, Florence, Ala. 

Samuel Isaac, L.U. 1093. Glen Cove, N. Y. 

J. W. Copithorne. L.U. 860. Framingham Center, Mass. 

William LeBlanc. L.U. 860. Framingham Center, Mass. 

D. D. Danielson, L.U. 87. Washington. D. C. 
H. E. Morris. L.U. 2024, Miami, Fla. 

J. E. Sheppard, L.U. 1509. Vero Beach. Fla. 
Oscar L. Peterson, L.U. 62. Chicago, III. 
William VanHouse, L.U. 1685, Melbourne, Fla. 
Charles B. League, L.U. 1685, Melbourne, Fla. 
Charles E. Scott, L.U. 1947. Hollywood, Fla. 
Joseph Mankowich. L.U. 3206, Pompano Beach. Fla. 
Clarence Gebhardt, L.U. 171. Youngstown, Ohio 
John Lamont, L.U. 404, Willoughby, Ohio 

Fritz Anderson, L.U. 58. Chicago. III., now living Tarpon Springs. Fla. 
Harold E. Lewis, L.U. 1509. Miami. Fla. 
John L. Hickey, L.U. 1966, Miami. Fla. 
Gerald Dolson, L.U. 1554. Miami, Fla. 
B. G. Edwards, L.U. 405, Miami, Fla. 
Paul Bay, L.U. 284, Jamaica, L. I.. N. Y. 
M. Tatom. L.U. 2399, Marianna, Fla. 
Kenneth Richards, L.U. 2368, Valparaiso, 
now living Crestview, Fla. 

John S. Jacobson, L.U. 1, Chicago, III. 

O. E. Keller. L.U. 12, Syracuse, N. Y. 

William L. Hodges, L.U. 1765, Orlando. Fla. 

Peter R. Sanderfan, L.U. 15, Midland Park, N. Y. 

George Westlake, L.U. 532, Elmira, N. Y. 

W. Harry Smith, L.U. 12, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Hubert Vandelcall, L.U. 100, Grand Haven, 

Phillip Sachs, L.U. 135. New York City, N. 

Roy F. Carroll, L.U. 369. Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Lester R. Mason, L.U. 177, Springfield, Mass. 

A. Tarris, L.U. 325, Paterson, N. J., now living Sarasota, Fla. 

Glen Wright. L.U. 985. Gary, Ind. 

Andrew Pearson. L.U. 1483, Medford, L. I., 

W. H. Root, L.U. 444, Pittsfield, Mass. 

Herbert Rasdeke, L.U. 181, Prospect Hgts, 

Howard Rowe, L.U. 885, Woburn, Mass. 

U. S. Simsonds, Jr., L.U. 162, San Mateo, Calif. 

Ralph McPherson, L.U. 22, San Francisco, Calif. 

Hartley J. Speck, L.U. 1433, Detroit, Mich. 

Kasper J. Werstein, L.U. 181, Park Ridge, 111. 

Kasper Werstein, L.U. 191, Largo, Fla. 

Dante Solon. L.U. 490. Passaic, N. J. 

Gustav W. Elmer, L.U. 62, Chicago, 111. 

Erik Henrikson, L.U. 1837, Babylan, N. Y. 

E. E. Anderson, L.U. 66, Jamestown, N. Y. 
Louis Otten, L.U. 5. St. Louis, Mo. 
L. Ross, L.U. 2212, Essex County, Mo. 
Casper Streich, L.U. 947, Ridgeway, Pa. 
Alfred Jorgensen, L.U. 91, Racine, Wis. 

Eric Swanson. L.U. 62. Chicago, 111., now living Longwood, Fla. 
Fred Girodano, L.U. 787, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Fla. (V.P. Fla. State Council), 



Mich. 
. Y. 



N. Y. 



111. 



Continued on Page 39 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



-LAKELAND NEWS cont'd 



Albert Edwardsen, L.U. 2073, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Art Bandi, L.U. 839, Round Lake, 111. 
William Chaplin, L.U. 2159, Cleveland, O. 
Paul Berg, L.U. 117, Albany, N. Y. 
Nils G. Holmquist, L.U. 117, Albany, N. Y. 
E. Cuthbert, L.U. 600, Saranac Lake, N. Y. 
W. E. Whilt, L.U. 1281, Island Park, L. I., N. Y. 
Herman Strenr, L.U. 2435, Bellfiower, Calif. 
Harry L. Garmier, L.U. 60, Speedway, Ind. 
Andrew St. Clair, L.U. 1089, Phoenix, Ariz. 
John J. Barin, Sr., L.U. 1856, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Thomas Hammer, L.U. 787, Port Richey",' Fla. 
Lester Gentry, L.U. 2078, Vista, Calif. 
George F. Dorrity, L.U. 306, Newark, N. J. 

Oscar Ware, L.U. 1799, Seattle, Wash., now living New Port Richey, Fla. 
Paul Fuller, L.U. 824, Muskegon, Mich. 

Carl Galina, L.U. 306, New York. N. Y., now living Long Beach, N. Y. 
Herman Pearson, L.U. 58, Chicago, 111., now living Sarasota, Fla. 
William F. Knudson, L.U. 1822, Fort Worth, Texas. 
Doyn W. Roe, L.U. 248, Toledo, Ohio. 
Lawrence E. Maisha, L.U. 369, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Charles Lohengren, L.U. 203, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., now living Orange City, 
Fla. 

William L. Cayse, L.U. 637, Hamilton, Ohio. 



Central Arizona Apprentice Winners 



PHOENIX, ARIZ.— The Central Ari- 
zona Carpenters' Joint Apprenticeship 
Committee held its annual Outstanding 
Apprentice Contest during April. This 
contest was to determine the two ap- 
prentices that would represent the Cen- 
tral Area in the state contest to be held 
in June. 

Eleven apprentices participated. Rich- 
ard E. Henry and Dennis C. Cooper of 
Local 1089, Phoenix, were the two top 
contestants. A $50 cash award will be 
given each of these young men for win- 
ning the area contest upon competing in 
the state contest. The winner of the state 
contest will receive the Cliff Maddus 
Award of $100 and the opportunity to 
represent Arizona in the Western Region 
Contest in Albuquerque, N. Mex., during 
the week of August 15. 




Robert W. Knox, secretary of the Cen- 
tral Arizona Carpenters' Joint Appren- 
ticeship Committee and business repre- 
sentative of Local 1089, Phoenix, center, 
congratulates the winners of the 1965 
Central Arizona Outstanding Carpenter 
Apprentice Contest — Richard E. Henry, 
left, and Dennis C. Cooper. (See Page 
26 for other apprenticeship reports.) 



Local 659 Holds 50th Anniversary 



RAWLINS, WYO.— On March 20, 
1965, Local 659 held a 50th Anniversary 
and Awards Presentation Banquet. Spe- 
cial recognition was given to W. H. 
Davies, who is a charter member of the 
local. Also honored was John E. Lender, 
a 40-year member, who joined the 
Brotherhood shortly after arriving in this 
country from Sweden. 

Membership pins were given out by 
Harry Peterson, secretary-treasurer of 
the Wyoming State Council, to the fol- 
lowing: seated — W. H. Davis (left) and 
Edward N. Cross; standing from the left: 
Frank Gordon, Charley Griffing and 
Hughie Wermore. Those unable to be 
present were: John E. Lander, George 
M. Hughes and H. E. Lake. 




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M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 



Save A Life This Summer 



IV/TTH the vacation season upon us once again, this 
might be a good time to add our plea, along with 
other national, state and local safety agencies, for a 
safe and sane summer vacation. 

The summer season adds a number of opportunities 
whereby we can meet a violent end that doesn't exist 
in other seasons. Swimming, a great form of exercise, 
can, and too often does, end in tragic death for many 
during the summer season. Just remember to have 
great respect for the water and never swim alone, when 
tired, or too soon after eating. These are some of the 
things that most of us have heard from childhood, but 
many of us seem to forget in the excitement of a sum- 
mer vacation. Last year over 6,000 people ended their 
holidays and vacations, permanently, with death by 
drowning. 

We can't say enough about being careful on the 
highways while going to and from our vacation or 
holiday. The majority of the 47,800 who were killed 
in traffic accidents last year might be walking around 
alive today if they had exercised a little more caution 
on the highway. Too many times simple impatience is 
the cause of highway deaths. In addition to the tragic 
highway death toll, motor vehicle accidents last year 
cost this country an estimated $8,300,000,000 in lost 
time, doctor bills, lost wages, medical care and other 
items. I think we will all agree that this money could 



have been better spent on new schools, churches and 
homes. 

A third area of great accident frequency, probably 
far more than we realize, is in the home. Next to deaths 
and accidents on the highway, the home ranks second 
as a killer. Last year nearly 30,000 deaths were caused 
by home accidents and over 4,000,000 were injured. 
This is more than double the number of deaths and 
injuries caused from on-the-job accidents! 

There is much evidence that the majority of acci- 
dents happen in situations which are generally thought 
to be "safe." Two-fifths of all fatal accidents to chil- 
dren between one and four years of age take place in 
or around the home. Prominent causes are burns and 
poisoning which, if not fatal, are generally serious. 
Yet almost all could be avoided by a little extra 
vigilance and a few simple precautions. 

The best present hope of accident prevention is 
certainly safety education. Innumerable accidents are 
due, at least in part, to some action or omission of the 
victim himself — the pedestrian who crosses the road 
without looking; the boy who tries to change a fuse 
without turning off the current; the swimmer who tries 
to go it alone. 

And so, this summer let all of us be just a little bit 
more careful and especially keep an eye out for the 
other guy. You might save his life and at the same 
time — save your own! 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



OFFICIAL 
INFORMATION 




GENERAL OFFICERS OF: 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 101 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 2000) 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave.. N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Finlay C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W.. 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



second general vice president 
William Sidell 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Tep.zick 
101 Constitution Ave.. N.W.. 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



First District, Charles Johnson. Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St.. New York 10, N. Y. 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 

Third District, Harry Schwarzer 
16678 State Road. North Royalton, Ohio 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd.. S. W.. Atlanta, Ga. 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul 16. Minn. 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City 10, Mo. 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 

1126 American Bank Bldg., 

621 S. W. Morrison St., Portland 5, Ore 

Eighth District, Patrick Hogan 
8564 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Ninth District, Andrew V. Cooper 
133 Chaplin Crescent. Toronto 7, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12. B. C. 



M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



WE NEED YOUR 

LOCAL UNION 

NUMBER 

Because we are chang- 
ing over our mail list to 
our new computer, it is 
impossible for us to add, 
subtract, or change an 
address if we do not have 
your Local Union num- 
ber. Therefore, if you 
want your name added to 
the mail list of the jour- 
nal, or if you want it 
taken off, or if you want 
your address changed, 
please include your Local 
Union No. in your re- 
quest. Thank you for 
your cooperation. 

PETER TERZICK 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 



NAME 



Local # 



OLD ADDRESS 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



City 



NEW ADDRESS 



Zone 



State 



.Local # 



City 



State 



Zip Code Number 



PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



BE SURE TO WRITE IN YOUR LOCAL UNION NUMBER 





Mitre boxes require an extra measure of 
manufacturing care to stand up under 
tough day-in-day-out use, yet perform 
with the precision that professionals 
demand. Here's why Stanley Mitre Boxes 
meet these rigid requirements . . . 




STRONG 

One-piece malleable-iron swivel arm 
and uprights provide great rigidity, 
permanent accuracy. They are practi- 
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EASY TO READ 

New, improved etched quadrant allows 
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from 0° to 45° left and right. Additional 
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Malleable-iron swivel clamping lever 
actuates tapered pin and clamping lug 
— simultaneously. Clamping lug is ad- 
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between holes. See your nearby Stanley 
supplier. Write for free 6 ft. Stanley Life 
Guard Yellow Tape Rule. $1.00 value. 
Stanley Tools, Division of The Stanley 
Works, New Britain, Connecticut. In 
Canada: Hamilton, Ontario. 



Official Publication ol the 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 



FOUNDED 1881 



JULY, 1965 



• ■■•■ ' '■*•#«» w>5* , 








Don't grown-ups know? 







Every litter bit hurts 



In the parking lot or along the high- 
way, grown-ups know that every litter 
bit hurts. But they forget. And that's 
how it all begins. Bit by bit the litter 
piles up and America the beautiful be- 
comes America the ugly. The litterbug 



m 



tf »"<*. 



t/ 



^ilT***' ' t *S& f 



2k 



jct-I^ws. 



'"•M SPOIUSS S«' s 
. KEEP . 

AMERICA 
BEAUTIFltf 




*jw$ 



is catching, too. Don't let it spread. 
Help stamp out littering, by setting the 
right example. Always carry a litterbag 
in your car. Always use it. If Mom and 
Dad remember, the youngsters won't 
forget to Keep America Beautiful! 



Published as a public service in cooperation 
with The Advertising Council. 



THE 



(S/NZXP 




VOLUME LXXXV 



NO. 7 



JULY, 1965 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Acting Editor 



[LflBOH PHESS8K 



IN THISISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Section 14(b) Hangs in the Balance 

The Rebild Festivals 4 

Carpenters Star at Union Industries Show 8 

Washington Apprentices Pack Books for Appalachia 12 

Repository of America's Heritage ' 15 

It's a Mirage; It's a Machine; It's a Door 17 

Holland, Mich., Members Restore Windmill 18 

The Legend of the Carpenter of Loretto 22 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 12 

Editorials 13 

Canadian Report 20 

Home Study Course, Unit Three 24 

Plane Gossip 25 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 26 

Local Union News 28 

In Memoriam 36 

What's New 37 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 

POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER. Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N. E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
0. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20$ in advance. 

i7 <r .'.\. , V :> :, :i) i7 
Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

The color guard of the Williams- 
burg, Virginia, Colonial Militia, steps 
smartly past a scattered array of 
tourists, as the militia's Fife and 
Drum Corps begins its annual Fourth 
of July ceremonies near the Public 
Magazine. 

The militia muster is a colorful 
ceremony held every Tuesday and 
Thursday afternoon. March through 
mid-October, but never is it more 
dramatic than on Independence Day, 
when men with shining muskets, 
buckled shoes, tricorn hats, and 
colonial costumes draw up in full 
regalia on the Market Square Green 
to recall the day in 1776 when the 
call for liberty sounded throughout 
the American colonies. 

Colonial Williamsburg, site of these 
annual ceremonies, has been restored 
to its 18th century splendor over a 
period of two decades, with millions 
of dollars supplied by the Rockefeller 
Foundation. 

This Colonial Capital of Virginia 
was an ideological training ground for 
leaders of American independence. 
For 81 influential years (1699-1780) 
it was a social, cultural and political 
center ranking in importance with 
Boston, Philadelphia and New York. 

Here, George Washington, Patrick 
Henry, George Wythe, Thomas 
Jefferson, George Mason. Edmund 
Pendleton and other leaders laid the 
foundations of our government. 





Section 14(b) Hangs in the Balance 

Anti-Unionists and Freeloaders Will Continue to Ride 
Roughshod, Unless You Write to Your Congressman Today! 



HR 77 — the Congressional bill to 
repeal Section 14(b) of the Taft- 
Hartley Act — is past the first hur- 
dle. By a one-sided vote of 21 to 10 
the House Labor Committee has ap- 
proved repeal of the open shop sec- 
tion of the national labor law, which 
permits states to enact "right-to- 
work" laws, and it is hoped that ac- 
tion will be forthcoming and favor- 
able on the floor of the House of 
Representatives. 

As this issue of The Carpenter 
goes to press, union legislative rep- 
resentatives are expecting House 
floor action on the bill in late June or 
early July. 

Meanwhile, Senator Pat McNa- 
mara, chairman of the Senate Sub- 
committee on Labor, has announced 
that he will hold hearings on S. 256, 
the Senate measure which would re- 
peal Section 14(b). 

The Party Vote 

In the House Labor Committee 
action, two Republicans — Reid and 
Rep. William Ayres of Ohio — voted 
for H.R. 77. Two Dixiecrats — Reps. 
Robert J. Scott of North Carolina 
and Sam Gibbons of Florida — were 
against. At least one of the eight 
Republicans who voted against re- 
peal — Rep. Charles Goodell of New 



York — is expected to back repeal 
on the floor. 

Rep. Robert Griffin (R., Mich.), 
co-author of the Landrum-Griffin 
Act, tried to introduce a substitute 
bill in both the subcommittee and 
the full committee. It was rejected in 
each instance by voice vote. 

Griffin would support repeal if 
organized labor was denied the right 
to act in the political or legislative 
arenas or operate in any field not di- 
rectly related to collective bar- 
gaining. 

Rep. Frank Thompson, author of 
H.R. 77 and chairman of the sub- 
committee, was optimistic over the 
prospects of his measure once it 
hits the House floor. 

"It will be a tough fight but we 
have the votes," he said. 

The Mail Is Heavy 

Despite such optimism, some of 
our friends in Congress tell us that 
they're getting 10 letters against us 
on 14(b) repeal for every one that 
they're getting for us. Though the 
ultimate test for a Congressman's 
policies is at the ballot box, mail 
from home is one of the ways a 
legislator must evaluate the wishes 
of his constituency. 

Anti-union groups, reactionary 
employers, and right-wing elements 



are now flooding Capitol Hill with 
their vitriolic smears of organized 
labor. They all cry about "the need 
for the worker to be protected 
against the union" . . . "compulsory 
unionism" . . . "criminal elements" 
. . . and they all urge that 14(b) 
remain the law of the land ... so 
they can go back to the state legis- 
latures and get more so-called 
"right-to-work" bills passed. 

Sheep and Goats 

As the labor news service Press 
Associates, points out in its "Wash- 
ington Window": "One positive ac- 
complishment of the hearings before 
the House Special Labor Subcom- 
mittee on repeal of Section 14(b) 
of the Taft-Hartley Act is to pro- 
vide a clear-cut separation of the 
sheep and goats — those who really 
believe in the labor movement and 
those who do not. 

"For years we have been listening 
to representatives of employer 
groups such as the National Asso- 
ciation of Manufacturers and the 
U.S. Chamber of Commerce recite, 
almost by rote, pious words about 
how unions are a good thing — 
but." 

Questioning of these representa- 
tives of management by an unusu- 
ally astute panel of Congressmen, 






THE CARPENTER 



led by Subcommittee Chairman 
Frank Thompson (D., N.J.), has 
usually elicited from the compulsory 
open shop advocates their real views 
of unions. 

Despite all the lip service, they 
are unquestionably opposed to just 
about everything that trade union- 
ism stands for today or in the past. 
So-called "right-to-work" laws are 
just one more way of undermining 
organizations of workers. 

The hearings got to the point that 
Rep. Robert Griffin (R., Mich.), 
hardly a pro-union advocate him- 
self as co-author of Landrum-Grif- 
fin, blurted out to the spokesman 
of the National Association of Man- 
ufacturers : 

"The NAM is not a very appro- 
priate organization to speak for the 
rights of individual workers. I don't 
think anyone is impressed." 

The wide disparity in outlook on 
14(b) of the nation's two big farm 
organizations was strung out bright 
and clear for the nation to see. 

The spokesman for the American 
Farm Bureau Federation, Walter L. 
Randolph of Montgomery, Ala., a 
vice president of the organization, 
did not hesitate to drag out every 
argument, real or imagined, to place 
the labor movement in the worst 
possible light. 

He took particular relish in talk- 
ing about "communist infiltration" 
. . . "compulsory unionism" . . . "the 
need of a worker to be protected 
against a union" . . . "criminal ele- 
ments" . . . "racketeers" . . . "sub- 
versive elements" and on and on. 

Not one word did Randolph offer 
"to acknowledge the great gains that 
the labor movement has achieved 
for the American worker, for the 
union contribution to a healthy and 
growing U. S. economy, for labor's 
firm fight for civil rights and con- 
sumer interests, for its unrelenting 
opposition to extremists of the left 
and right. 

Says Randolph: "Why not let the 
people decide?" 

The About-Face 

Yet, when the workers through 
their union and the employer — the 
people involved — decide that a un- 
ion shop is desirable, he would deny 
them the freedom of contract. 

Contrast this with the thinking of 



President James G. Patton of the 
National Farmers Union. His views 
on so-called "right to work" laws: 

". . . such laws are a blow at or- 
ganized labor. They create no jobs 
or rights to a job . . . The effect is 
to weaken unionization where or- 
ganization is in being and to prevent 
it where it does not exist. 

"The effect is to protect the low 
wage economies of the Southern 
.states and open up a like situation 
in midwestern and western agricul- 
tural states which are seeking to 
broaden a non-existent industrial 
base. 

"The effect is to strengthen the 
position of employers." 

Actually, as Patton pointed out, 
the sharply divergent views of the 
Farmers Union and the Farm Bu- 




reau are not an accident and have 
nothing to do with freedoms. The 
Farmers Union represents the small 
family farmer; the Farm Bureau has 
long been a spokesman and, in ef- 
fect, represents the corporate inter- 
ests of management. 

Patton says that the Farm Bu- 
reau is tied up, hands and gloves, 
with processors and marketing 
groups. Farm Bureau President 
Charles Shuman is also head of an 
organization known as the National 
Food Conference Association. 

This group is composed of 69 em- 
ployer firms such as H. J. Heinz, 
Campbell Soup and Hormel. Says 
Patton: 

"It is interesting to note that these 
firms have membership in the anti- 
union, anti-family farmer Agricul- 
ture Committee of the U. S. Cham- 
ber of Commerce." 

During the House Subcommittee 
hearings the word "freedom" was 



bandied about pretty recklessly. 
But, as even Rep. Griffin points out, 
how can you really be impressed 
with testimony of employer groups 
— or fronts for employers — who 
have so much to gain by the throt- 
tling of unions and the denial of 
union security? 

No Chance to Vote 

The people of the United States 
have never had a chance to cast a 
vote on the question of whether the 
union shop should stay or go. But 
in several populous states like Cali- 
fornia, for example, the citizens 
have had a chance — and they have 
voted to keep the union shop. 

Perhaps the most impressive se- 
ries of votes for the union shop 
came just after the Taft-Hartley Act 
was passed. That law required the 
Federal government to conduct elec- 
tions and have workers in particular 
bargaining situations vote on wheth- 
er or not they wanted the union 
shop. A fabulous total of 46,119 
such elections were conducted and 
in 97.1% of the cases the union 
shop won! In all, 5,500,000 indi- 
vidual workers voted in such elec- 
tions and 91% cast their votes for 
the union shop. The evidence was 
so overwhelming that Senator Taft 
himself asked Congress to eliminate 
the elections as unnecessary — and 
this was done. 

Today in a minority of states, in 
a small minority of all the collective 
bargaining situations in the United 
States, so-called "right-to-work" 
laws keep a majority of the workers 
from bargaining for a union shop 
in their particular bargaining situa- 
tion. This discrimination against 
unions keeps unions weak in those 
areas. It hurts workers and their 
families in other states as well. 

Congress now has the direction 
of the President of the United States 
that this unjust situation must be 
corrected. Let us hope that Con- 
gress heeds his request that Section 
14(b) be repealed. 
• 
ELEVENTH HOUR REMINDER: 
Personal letters from you to your Con- 
gressman and Senator, calling for re- 
peal of 14(b) will help tip the scales 
in labor's favor in the final Congres- 
sional vote. Send your letters NOW 
to your particular legislator at Wash- 
ington, D. C, 20225. 



JULY, 1965 



¥ * ¥ * 

L X T X T X T X 




century — some twenty-five to 

forty thousand people will 

assemble in a park in northern 

Denmark to commemorat 

M 
the birth of liberty in the 

United States 



r pO MANY lovers of literature, 
■*• Denmark means first of all Kron- 
berg Castle at Elsinore, the setting 
which Shakespeare provided for 
such famous utterances as "some- 
thing is rotten in Denmark" or "to 
be or not to be — " and "the play's 
the thing." 

There are not so many who are 
familiar with another unique struc- 
ture, Denmark's Lincoln Log Cabin 
museum. Nor are there many who 



realize that this is the site of an an- 
nual celebration of America's Dec- 
laration of Independence. 

Rebild National Park in the Dan- 
ish penisula in the northern section 
of Jutland is the setting for this mu- 
seum. Ruth Bryan Owen (the first 
woman appointed to the rank of 
Minister in the American foreign 
service) during the dedication cere- 
monies in 1934 referred to this struc- 
ture as being symbolic of the birth- 



place of many early American presi- 
dents — particularly one of the truly 
great presidents, Abraham Lincoln. 
Thus, by pure chance, the structure 
was christened by a phrase in a dedi- 
cation speech. 

The cabin is built of hand-hewn 
logs gathered from all parts of the 
United States. The typical pioneer 
construction technique of half-notch- 
ing the logs was used at the corners 
and simulated chinked joints were 



THE CARPENTER 



placed between each log. 

Apparently the Danish craftsmen 
did not think highly of mixing clay 
with water or even using a lime and 
sand putty in the manner of the 
American frontier days. Instead the 
joints were rammed tight with 
oakum yarn, and a bitumin mastic 
material was neatly applied to bring 
this caulking flush to the surface 
face of each horizontal and vertical 
joint. 

The early American log cabin ' 
builders undoubtedly would approve 
of this deviation and would have 
done likewise had oakum and bitu- 
men mastics been available ma- 
terials in their day. 

Judging by the appearance of 
these joints it is apparent that pro- 
fessional ship caulkers were re- 
cruited for the job. (And this is still 
not a lost art in this seafaring coun- 
try with a fishing fleet of over 14,- 
000 vessels.) 

The windows of the Lincoln Log 
Cabin came from California, the oak 
batten doors from Michigan and the 
wood shakes from New York State. 
The only other non-American fron- 
tier construction feature is the 
trussed roof which was required to 
provide for a completely open space 
interior, as the structure was de- 
signed to be used as a museum. A 
huge open-hearth fireplace is typi- 
cally located at the gable end of the 
cabin. 

The Lincoln Log Cabin Museum 
houses a collection of authentic ob- 




Almost 40,000 Danes and foreign visitors assembled on the hills of Rebild National 
Park for the annual festival to commemorate American Independence. Danish 
Americans helped to establish the festival through periodic reunions in their native 
land during the early 1900's. The 200-acre park is covered with purple heather. 



jects recalling the way of life of the 
Danish pioneers who settled in the 
United States. These range from a 
covered wagon from Utah to innum- 
erable "plows that broke the plains," 
a beautiful feathered Sioux Indian 
ceremonial headdress and possibly 
the only place outside the United 
States where there is on constant dis- 
play a complete collection of the 
silken flags of the fifty states of the 
Union. 

The idea of the park was original- 
ly inspired by prominent Danish- 



Americans early in this century. The 
land was acquired in 1912 and the 
title-deed of Rebild National Park 
was presented to H. M. King Chris- 
tian X, who accepted on behalf of 
the Danish nation. 

The first official commemoration 
of our Independence Day was July 
4, 1914, and was attended by 4,000 
people. This Fourth of July festival 
has continued annually ever since 
with the exception of the Danish 
World War I neutrality period, and 
during the period of German occu- 



The Danish royal family observes the festivities from a special 
tent. In the front row are Their Majesties Queen Ingrid, King 
Frederik IX, and Princess Margrethe, heir to the crown of 
Denmark. Behind them: Princesses Benedikte and Anne-Marie. 



As the map below shows, Rebild National Park, site of 
the festival, is in the northern portion of Jutland, Den- 
mark, 19 miles south of Aalborg. The Lincoln Cabin 
marks the site. Copenhagen is at lower right, below. 









A covered wagon donated by Salt Lake City's Chamber of 
Commerce with the sanction of Utah's governor. The Minne- 
sota state flag was made and donated by Danish women of 
Minnesota. 



At right, an Indian mannequin in full 
regalia donated by the Rochester, 
N.Y., Museum of Arts and Sciences. 



The Lincoln Memorial Log Cabin in Rebild Park houses a col- 
lection of relics from the days of Danish pioneers in America. 



f: $f« 





Red Cross Blanket, made by Danish American women during 
World War I and donated by Mrs. Ida Adams of San Francisco 
to the Log Cabin Museum. The Viking Ship was made and 
donated by the Danish carpenter and author, Thor Schack. 



Seminole Indian models, created and 
brightly clothed by Seminoles and do- 
nated by W. L. Pedersen of Waverly, 
Florida. 




pation in World War II. The first 
festival after liberation on July 4. 
1945 was attended by 25,000 per- 
sons and grew to an estimated 50,- 
000 in 1948. Since then the annual 
attendance has been twenty-five to 
forty thousand. 

The program usually consists of 
speeches by the Danish King or 
Prime Minister (sometimes both), 
the Ambassador from the United 
States and other dignitaries from 
both countries are always on the 
program. On this occasion the Amer- 
ican Ambassador always has a greet- 
ing from the President of the United 
States. 

During the 50th Founding Anni- 
versary program in 1962 the Ameri- 
can Ambassador, William McCor- 
mick Blair Jr., read the following 



message from President John F. 
Kennedy: 

"Denmark and the United States 
have a great deal in common and a 
long history of cordial relations. No 
feature of the shared beliefs marking 
this pleasant association is more 
outstanding than our mutual respect 
for liberty and our jealous safe- 
guarding of the dignity of the indi- 
vidual." 

"Danes and Americans have cele- 
brated Independence Day on July 4, 
at Rebild, Denmark, for fifty years. 
It is, I think a most extraordinary 
example of international friendship 
when the people of another country 
celebrate American Independence 
Day on their own soil. In gathering 
each year at Rebild, Danes and 
Americans pay solemn tribute to the 



democratic ideals and values cher- 
ished by each people." 

"July 4, 1962 will mark the 
golden jubilee observance of the Re- 
bild Independence Day ceremonies. 
I send my most cordial greetings on 
this occasion and hope that as many 
Americans as possible will take this 
opportunity to join with their count- 
less Danish friends in enjoying this 
unique occasion." 

With these words in mind it might 
be well to reflect for a moment dur- 
ing our mad dash to the beaches or 
to the mountains for the long week- 
end of this "Glorious Fourth of 
July" that some twenty-five to forty 
thousand people will assemble at a 
National park in a foreign land to 
celebrate our American Independ- 
ence Day. 



THE CARPENTER 




Washington ROUNDUP 



MAJOR REDUCTIONS in excise taxes , totalling $3.9 billion, are sought by President 
Johnson in this session of 'Congress. "Many of our existing excises were born of 
depression and war," the President declared. "Many were designed to restrain 
civilian demand in wartime and thereby free resources for military use. They need 
to be re-examined to reassure that they do not hold back an expanding peacetime 
economy." If the excise tax reduction, as proposed by President Johnson, is 
enacted into law, these are some of the savings the consumer should receive, if 
fully implemented: a motorist on a $3000 automobile ... $150. 00; a housewife on 
a $200 appliance. . .$10.00; a music lover on a $500 stereo set . . . $50. 00; a golfer 
with $500 in country club dues. . .$100. 00; a baseball fan, per $2.50 ticket ... 25c; 
and a playboy who spends $1000 annually in cabarets. .. $100.00. 

SORDID DETAILS— Chairman John W. Macy, Jr., of the U. S. Civil Service Commission 
has ordered government agencies to stop questioning job applicants on their sex 
lives and other personal matters. He said that the results of such questioning 
could be "grossly misinterpreted." 

A PROGRAM FOR THE ELDERLY is being pushed by Senator Pat McNamara. With the 
number of Americans over 65 growing at the rate of a million every three years, 
Senator McNamara wants legislation that would establish a high-level federal 
agency to recognize their interests. Appearing on the APL-CI0 public service radio 
program "As We See It," McNamara said that the interest of older people should 
be placed on a non-welfare basis. Legislation, which also would provide funds for 
state programs for the elderly, already has passed the House by a 394 to 1 vote. 
He expects that it will pass the Senate without any difficulty. 

A MINE SAFETY ACT that would extend Federal regulation to mines employing 14 or 
fewer workers has been approved by the House of Representatives by a 335 to 43 
vote. The Act would affect about 8,000 mines in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Vir- 
ginia, Kentucky, and Ohio, which have been exempt from Federal coal mining laws. 

A PROPOSED STUDY seeking ways to meet the problem of recruiting qualified persons 
to staff prisons and correctional institutions is being backed by the AFL-CIO. 
Legislative Director Andrew J. Biemiller said that the bill, which calls for an 
appropriation of $2,100,000, would be an "important first step in overcoming our 
nation's long-standing neglect of its prisons." 

UNEMPLOYMENT DROP— President Johnson, who is reported to have been none too 
happy over recent gloomy talk about the. economy by the chief of the Federal 
Reserve Board, is highly elated at mid-May unemployment figures which have dropped 
to the lowest level since October 1957 — almost seven years. The President himself 
announced the figures at the White House — a jobless rate of 4.6 per cent as 
compared with the 4.9 per cent rate during April and 4.9 per cent a year ago. 
There were 3,335,000 unemployed as compared with 3,552,000 in April and 
3,369,000 in May of 1964. 



SOME 41 MILLION AMERICANS will take to the woods this summer laden with tents, 
stoves, and sleeping bags. Not since frontier days has such a large portion of 
the population slept under canvas. Today, there are more than 10,000 public 
campgrounds throughout the United States compared to 3,000 a decade ago, the 
National Geographic Society says. The increase doesn't include the thousands 
of commercial campsites that have sprung up. 

JULY, 1965 




«Fi.l;l:l:|?ii4;'K 



STAR 
T 1965 
NION 
USTRIE 
SHOW 



United Brotherhood members 
installed 80% of the exhibits in 
the big labor-management exhibition. 

Up to 63 Carpenters were working inside 

the domed arena before the opening. 




THE 20TH ANNUAL Union In- 
dustries Show — which can be 
culled ihe greatest trade union show 
on earth — came to the new Civic 
Arena in Pittsburgh during the last 
week of May. It was a thrilling expe- 
rience for over 200.000 Western Penn- 
sylvanians who came to inspect the 
many products produced and services 
rendered by the American labor move- 
ment. 

Much interest was shown in the large 
display area sponsored by the United 
Brotherhood and erected by the Dis- 
trict Council of Pittsburgh and Vicin- 
ity. 

Each year the Union Industries 
Show moves to a different metropolis 
around the nation — to guarantee a new 
and wide-eyed audience each time. 
Estimates are that up to a quarter of 
a million visitors actually passed 
through the doors of the Golden Tri- 
angle City's Civic Arena for this year's 
six-day event. As during previous 
shows, gifts and prizes and souvenirs 
galore — well over $100,000 worth — 
were given away at the various booths, 



along with plenty of good solid infor- 
mation and straight facts. 

Within the United Brotherhood's 
display area, located almost in the 
center of the great domed hall, the 
following exhibits were set up: 

• E. L. Bruce Company, showing 
hardwood flooring and floor waxes. 

• Brunswick Corporation, showing 
bowling-floor stock, bowling pins, a 
section of a billiard table, and a cue- 
stick rack arrangement. 

• Carpenters' Joint Apprenticeship 
Program, showing the shell of a mod- 
ern building, incorporating all the dif- 
ferent phases of framing. 

• Cook Anderson Company, showing 
photos of some of the millwork jobs it 
has done. 

• Dickerson Structural Concrete Cor- 
poration, showing pictures of precast 
concrete buildings set by members of 
the United Brotherhood. 

• Drechsler Cabinet Company, show- 
ing a 1965-style kitchen cabinet unit. 

• Joseph Home Company, a leading 
Pittsburgh department store, showing 
furniture, draperies, and carpeting 
serviced by members of the United 
Brotherhood. 

• Lumber Institute of Allegheny 
County, showing a cabinet (partially 
cut away) showing a cabinet designed 
for a church's clerical vestments. 

• Master Builders Association of 
Western Pennsylvania, showing lighted 



>Y 





The overall display area of the Broth- 
erhood as seen from the center of the 
Arena floor, was an eye-catcher with its 
clean, white lines and lighted hooths. 



pictures of some of the jobs handled 
by member contractors. 

• Tri-State Gypsum Dry Wall Con- 
tractors' Association, showing a doll 
house that a child could enter and 
play in. 

• United Brotherhood and Carpen- 
ters' District Council of Pittsburgh and 
Vicinity, jointly sharing a headquarters 
booth. 

• U. S. Department of Agriculture's 
Forest Service, showing pictures of 



modern forestry techniques and lum- 
ber preservation. 

• University of Pittsburgh, showing 
a made-to-scale model of its present 
and future campus. 

• Wood Manufacturers Council, Inc., 
suppliers of much of the material sup- 
plies used in preparation of the over- 
all exhibit. 

Director of the United Brother- 
hood's exhibit for the Union Industries 
Show this year was Joseph A. Senge, 



Secretary-Treasurer of the Pittsburgh 
and Vicinity Carpenters' District Coun- 
cil. Coordinator of the individual exhi- 
bits was Joseph Poplowski, Business 
Representative of the Carpet and Lino- 
leum Workers, Local 1759. All the 
business agents of the District Council, 
representing some 60 locals, aided in 
preparation of the displays and were 
on hand in "shifts" during the 1 to 11 
p.m. show hours to explain the exhibits 
and man the area. 



Pittsburgh's famed arena, near the center of the city's Golden Triangle, has a 148-foot-high, stainless steel roof — the largest of 
its kind in the world. It is Pittsburgh's new center for sports, cultural, recreational, and civic events. During the last week of 
May it was host to more than 200,000 visitors to the big annual AFL-CIO Union-Industries Show. Built at a total cost of $22,- 
000,000 three years ago, it quickly became an attraction of Western Pennsylvania. In its 90,000 square feet of floor space it 
housed the more than 300 exhibits of the 1965 U-I Show. Within a 50-mile radius of this vast arena is a population of more 
than 3,500,000 people — an area rated the fifth largest in the nation in industrial marketing terms. 





A crowd-stopper at the Pittsburgh show 
was the booth of the International Ladies' 
Garment Workers Union, above. 

The business agents who were espe- 
cially active with the exhibit were Carl 
A. Benson, Warren B. Grimm, John 
W. Howard, John G. Kelly, Mike 
Knezevich, Joseph A. Kunz, Herschel 
Marshall, Frank W. Miller, Bright 
Remaley. I. F. Rockwell, Harry C. 
Schilling, Melvin J. Schuster, Donald 
R. Shaw, Eugene Solomon, and Ray- 
mond G. Steinhauser — as well as An- 
thony J. DeSio, Special Representa- 
tive. 

On the opening day of the Show — 
at a luncheon given at Pittsburgh^ 
Penn Sheraton Hotel by the AFL-CIO 
Union Label and Service Trades De- 
partment, which directs the exhibi- 
tion each year — over 300 top national 
and local leaders of organized labor 
and representatives of government and 
industry were greeted by a letter 
from President Johnson. 



At Right: Examining a frame-construc- 
tion model on display are Show Director 
Joseph Lewis, General Secretary Richard 
Livingston, AFL-CIO Union Label Trades 
Department Pres. Richard Walsh, First 
Gen. Vice Pres. Finlay Allan, and Gen- 
eral Treasurer Peter Terzick. 




The Brotherhood offered show visitors the opportunity to sign up for a drawing of 
$1,000 worth of United States Savings Bonds. The grand prize was a $500 bond. 
Above, the crowd gathers to sign up for chances for these investments in America's 
future. 




A model of the University of Pittsburgh campus, prepared by Brotherhood members 
to exact scale, was prominently displayed at the Carpenters' exhibit. Shown examin- 
ing it in detail are Council Sec.-Treas. Joseph Senge; Bus. Rep. Carl Benson; Council 
Pres. David Brown; George Dawson, coordinator from Connelly Vocational High 
School; and Charles Slinker. 




The training program was explained in exhibit above. Ad- 
miring a shop project are: George Dawson, John Kelly, 
First Gen. Vice Pres. Finlay Allan, and Joseph Senge. 



4 1 
















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"America's industrial democracy is 
enjoying an unprecedented level of 
economic success," the President said. 
"There are hopeful signs that indus- 
trial relations have turned to a new 
path — one in which the public interest 
is represented. The Union Industries 
Show symbolizes this mutuality of in- 
terest." 

Following the luncheon, a ribbon- 
cutting ceremony took place before 
several hundred people in front of the 
main entrance of the Civic Arena. 
Many dignitaries were present. A brass 
band played spritely. The ribbon was 
cut by U. S. Congressman James G. 
Fulton, who represents the Pittsburgh 
area in the House of Representatives. 

The turnstiles inside the doors soon 
started clicking, and it remained like 
this for the entire Show — starting at 
1 p.m. and ending at 1 1 o'clock at 
night, for six straight days. 

The selection of Pittsburgh for this 
year's Union Industries Show was a 
good one. Pittsburgh's location in West- 
ern Pennsylvania and at the center of 
the northeast quadrant of the nation 
gives events going on there much more 
importance than they would otherwise 
have. Within a 50-mile radius of the 
Civic Arena is a population of more 
than 3.500,000 people — an area rated 
the fifth largest in the nation, in indus- 
trial marketing terms. 

The Civic Arena is also unusual. 
Built at a total cost of $22,000,000 
three years ago, it has a vast 148-ft- 
high stainless steel retractable roof — ■ 
the largest of its kind in the world — ■ 
which can be opened or closed in 2Vz 
minutes. It is Pittsburgh's new center 
for sports, cultural, recreational, and 
civic events. 

Of the 90,000 square feet of floor 
space that the Arena provided for the 
over-all Show and its more than 300 
exhibits, the United Brotherhood dis- 
play area took 1.800 square feet (20 x 
90 feet in dimensions). This was one 
of the largest individual exhibit areas 
in the whole show. 

The traffic builder at the United 
Brotherhood exhibit was the oppor- 
tunity for the public to sign up for a 
drawing of $1,000 worth of U. S. 
Savings Bonds — the funds for their 
purchase being donated by the United 
Brotherhood headquarters in Wash- 
ington. The grand prize was a $500 
bond. Two $100, two $50, and eight 
$25 bond winners were also selected 
in the drawing held the final evening 
of the Show. 

A winner of one of the $25 bonds 
was George W. Shirk, Jr., a journey- 



man carpenter member of Local 430 
in Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

The child-size doll house built by 
the Tri-State Gypsum Dry Wall Con- 
structors' Association was also awarded 
during the final-night festivities. 

Prominent among the other ex- 
hibits at the show was a model of the 
blockhouse of old Fort Pitt (actually 
located at the confluence of the Alle- 
gheny and Monongahela Rivers at 
-Pittsburgh's Golden Triangle), built in 
plaster by members of the Operative 
Plasterers and Cement Masons Inter- 
national Association, next to the Car- 
penters and Joiners' booth. The block- 
house model was donated to the City 
of Pittsburgh for a permanent exhibit 
at the end of the Show. 

One of the exhibitions of skill which 
attracted interest among the spectators 
was shearing of a live sheep by mem- 
bers of the Amalgamated Meat Cut- 
ters and Butcher Workmen of North 
America, and the blowing of glass bot- 
tles by two members of the Glass Bot- 
tle Blowers Association of the United 
States and Canada. 

There were also exhibits and exhi- 
bitions of meat cutting, bricklaying, 
pottery, cake decorating, culinary art- 
istry, and other union skills. 

Among giveaways in various booths 
around the Show were $5,000 in 
groceries and meats daily by the Meat 
Cutters, a fiberglass motor boat by 
the Glass Blowers, a $5,000 race horse 
by Waterford Park, a spinet piano by 
the Hotel and Restaurant Workers, 
clock radios by the Building Service 
Employes, and household appliances 
by both the International Brotherhood 
of Electrical Workers and the Stove, 
Furnace and Allied Appliance Work- 
ers of North America. 

It should be noted in concluding 
this account of the United Brother- 
hood's role in the 1965 Union Indus- 
tries Show that 80% of all the ex- 
hibits in the show were installed by 
members of the United Brotherhood. 
This included preparation of back- 
ground, erecting, decorating, and 
hanging of drapes. 

A letter received by the Pittsburgh 
and Vicinity District Council from 
George Behonak, vice president of 
Brede, Inc., contractors for this year's 
Union Industries Show, was profuse 
in its thanks to the Council for supply- 
ing competent men in all quantities as 
needed at the Arena. Up to 63 United 
Brotherhood members were working 
inside the domed structure at one 
time in the brief hectic period just be- 
fore the show opened. 




1 T | r [ .,L. l i,.x.ui.,-i,,.il 



Below, a Master Builders' exhibit fea- 
tured photos of major jobs performed by 
member contractors in Pittsburgh area. 




Below, the Cook Anderson Company 
showed pictures of high quality millwork. 




The Brunswick Corporation exhibited 
work of members in bowling and billiard 
equipment in the display above. 



JULY, 1965 



11 



Labor, Management, PTA Aid War on Poverty 



Washington Apprentices 
Pack Books for Appalachii 



CHILDREN in the drub schools 
and homes of the Appalachia 
region will be able temporarily to 
escape their sorry surroundings into 
a world of interest and enchantment. 

This is due to an unusual cooper- 
ative effort among the Washington, 
D. C, Joint Carpentry Apprentice- 
ship Committee, the Montgomery 
County, Maryland, Parent-Teachers 
Association, lumber manufacturers, 
and the District of Columbia school 
administration. 

The four groups are united in a 
pilot program likely to spread to 
other parts of the nation in which 
thousands of books are being col- 
lected by PTA members and then 
shipped to remote and destitute 
areas in boxes that become book- 
cases when the contents are emptied. 

Two hours a night, three nights a 
week, about 300 young men who 
work as carpenter apprentices dur- 
ing the day report to Bell Vocational 
School, 3145 Hyatt Place, N.W. in 
Washington. 

Here they receive additional in- 
struction under Nicholas R. Loope, 
director of the Joint Carpentry Ap- 
prenticeship Committee, composed 
of four members of the Carpenters 
District Council and four from the 
Master Builders Association, the 
Construction Contractors Council 
and the Mill Operators. 

Four-year apprenticeship training 
is given in five carpentry trades. 

The 300 apprentices now are 
building boxes about two feet long 
by one foot high holding three dozen 
books. 

After the books have been un- 
packed, the boxes may be laid on 
end to become attractive wall cases. 

The collecting of books is under 
the supervision of Mrs. Edwin Roed- 
der of Bethesda. Maryland, chair- 
man of the Montgomery County 
Parent-Teachers Association library 
committee. 

Mrs. Roedder estimated that at 
least 25 local schools were "doing 
something constructive about the 




SHIPPING BOXES that become bookcases are being turned out by some 300 
union apprentice carpenters in Washington to help the nationwide drive to send 
books to children in depressed areas, such as Appalachia. Shown in the work- 
shop are (foreground, left to right) Mrs. O. G. Brain, chairman of the Mont- 
gomery County (Md.) Parent-Teacher Association, which is active in collecting 
books; Mrs. Edwin Roedder, chairman of the PTA unit's Library Committee; 
Treas. Peter E. Terzick of the Carpenters, and Bernard C. Hartung of the Na- 
tional Lumber Manufacturers Association, which is supplying the lumber. 



program, some completely on their 
own and some with our help." 

Books being sent to the thousands 
of children and young people in 
eastern Kentucky and throughout 
the Appalachian Mountains, who are 
remote from the mainstream of 
American civilization in an existence 
dominated by poverty and monot- 
ony, include almost anything of 
taste that are in good condition. 

The suggested list of "one hun- 
dred most wanted books" run in an 
advertisement by the PTA ranges 
from holiday books, fairy tales, leg- 
ends and science to biography, fic- 
tion, history, poetry, fine arts and 
applied science. 

Easy-to-read and picture books 
are as sought after as "Medieval 
Days and Ways" and "All About 
Television and Radio." 

Mrs. Roedder said that the city of 
Rockville, Md., had given her group 
a well-located empty store in its 
urban renewal area to use as a col- 
lection center and women volunteers 
are at the location from 10 a.m. to 
2 p.m. three days a week. 



The D.C. school administration 
helps the program by giving the joint 
carpentry apprenticeship committee 
the use of Bell Vocational School 
and also a financial allowance for 
teachers. 

One of the individuals most re- 
sponsible for the Carpenter-PTA 
program is Arnold Ordman, general 
counsel of the National Labor Rela- 
tions Board, who saw an opportu- 
nity not only to help the Appalachia 
program but also a project for the 
four-year apprenticeship training 
program. 

Peter E. Terzick, treasurer of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters, 
AFL-CIO, saw that the suggestion 
fitted in with organized labor's com- 
mitment to be active in community 
service and encouraged Loope, as 
did L. M. Rice, Jr., chairman of the 
Joint Carpentery Apprenticeship 
Program. 

Lumber for the boxes was provi- 
ded by the National Lumber Manu- 
facturers Association, whose repre- 
sentative is Bernard C. Hartung. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 





EDITORIALS 



* WHERE THE POOR MAY LIVE 

If the United States is to truly achieve "The Great 
Society" status which the current Administration is 
promoting, one of the first essentials is going to be 
adequate housing for low- and middle-income workers. 

Upper-class earners will be able to take care of 
themselves. But middle-class earners, beset by high 
costs and the necessities of life and education for their 
children, often are forced down the economic housing 
ladder until they compete (and successfully!) with the 
low-wage earners for available sub-standard housing. 
Then where does that leave the low-wage earner? 

The nation is going to need more housing. It is go- 
ing to need public housing, rental housing, cooperative 
housing and housing particularly designed for the elder- 
ly. In order to achieve many of these goals, H.R. 2170 
has been introduced in Congress, the "Public Works 
Act of 1965." The two billion dollar measure would 
provide grants-in-aid in the construction of badly- 
needed community facilities. 

If we do not continue to go ahead in housing we will 
slip backward. When we slip backward, slums result. 
We need H.R. 2170 to keep the nation well-housed and 
preserve the nation's cities. 

* OUR CROWDED COLLEGES 

Educators from the nation's largest public colleges, 
at a recent meeting of the Association of State Uni- 
versities and Land Grant Colleges held in Washington, 
painted a dark picture of the hope for accommodating 
all of the nation's deserving applicants for higher 
education. Tidal waves of children born during the 
World War II years have arrived at college doors 
and are being turned away in unprecedented numbers. 

The most effective and economical way to solve 
the problem, according to Missouri University Presi- 
dent Elmer Davis, is Federally-financed expansion of 
classroom, library, laboratory and dormitory buildings. 

Despite a growth in junior colleges, the situation is 
critical. Many of the junior college students become 
university students in their junior and senior years. A 
greater percentage of high school students want to go 
on to college, and have the groundwork to do so. 
More undergraduates are staying on the campus to 
take advanced studies. As a result, the enrollment 



figures are phenomenal. It will be impossible to meet 
the need with any short-range program. 

All of which indicates the need for substantial 
Federal assistance, said Missouri's President Ellis. In 
the next decade, he estimates, public spending on 
higher education must increase by $50 billion. The 
U.S. Office of Education announced last month grants 
and loans totaling $49,350,419 for college construc- 
tion. Much more is needed. 



Life-Saving Project for Labor Day 



It may seem premature to be thinking of Labor 
Day and the end of summer when summer is only 
beginning. And yet if you want to do something 
effective to make labor's own holiday a safer and 
happier holiday, now is the time to start planning 
on how your local or council can do its part in 
the 1965 Labor Day Safety Campaign sponsored by 
AFL-CIO. 

This will be the seventh annual campaign spon- 
sored by AFL-CIO. For several years results of 
the campaigns were very encouraging; and Labor 
Day became one of the safest of our national holi- 
days. Last year was a very disappointing one, as 
682 people were killed over the Labor Day week- 
end. In this year of an alarming rise in accidents 
and deaths, your help in reversing this trend was 
never needed more than it is now. Here is an op- 
portunity for your local or council to perform a 
vital service for its members — as well as a chance 
to show your community what you can do for the 
public good. 

Believing that all members of the Brotherhood 
will want to participate if they have the tools to 
do the job, your General President is sending a let- 
ter to every local and council giving full informa- 
tion on the campaign. Arrangements have been 
made with the National Safety Council to provide 
instructions and materials for planning an effective 
program in your community. This information will 
soon be in the hands of the officers of all locals 
and councils. Now is the time to send for your free 
campaign guide. Then you will have plenty of time 
to plan for an effective program of your own. Let's 
make Labor Day 1965 the safest one on record. 



JULY, 1965 



13 




Repository of America s Heritage 



Archives Building in Nation's Capital 
Houses Rare Collection of Documents That 
Trace Our Country's Path to Greatness 



On September 5, 1774, 
delegates from 1 1 Amer- 
ican Colonies met at Car- 
penters Hall in Philadelphia to form 
the First Continental Congress. The 
hall had been started in 1770 by the 
Carpenters' Company of Philadel- 
phia, a craftsmen's guild, and was 
not yet completed in 1774. John 
Adams tells in his diary how the 
meeting-place was selected: 

"At Ten, The Delegates all met 
at the City Tavern, and walked to 
the Carpenters Hall, where they took 
a View of the Room, and of the 
Chamber where is an Excellent Li- 
brary. There is also a long Entry, 
where Gentlemen may walk, and a 
convenient Chamber opposite to the 
Library. The General Cry was, that 
this was a good Room, and the 
Question was put, whether We were 
satisfied with this Room, and it 
passed in the Affirmative. A very 
few were for the Negative and they 
were chiefly from Pennsylvania and 
New York." 

Today the papers of the Conti- 
nental Congress, which date from 
this meeting, are in the National 
Archives at Washington. Here 
scholars may consult these earliest 
records of our nation and study the 
attempts to reconcile the differences 
with Great Britain, the adoption of 
the Declaration of Independence and 
the carrying on of the Revolutionary 
War. Here, recorded in the journal 
for February 14, 1776, is the recog- 
nition by the Congress of the im- 
portant part that carpenters were 
playing in building frigates for the 
Continental forces: 

"Application being made by some 
of the master carpenters employed 
in building the continental frigates, 
to some members of this house, in- 
forming that about fifty of their 
journeymen and apprentices had en- 



gaged as volunteers to march with 
the battalion of associators for New 
York, and that . their zeal for the 
public service is such, that they can- 
not be persuaded to desist by any 
arguments or influence of said 
builders: 

"Resolved, That the spirit and zeal 
of the said journeymen and appren- 
tices is highly approved of by Con- 
gress; but, nevertheless, it is the 
opinion of this Congress, that the 
public will be more essentially 
served by the said associators con- 
tinuing at their work on the said 
continental frigates; and that, there- 
fore, all the carpenters, journeymen, 
and apprentices, employed as afore- 
said, be requested to remain in that 
service, as there is no doubt but 
other associators will compleat the 
number wanted." 

These records of the Continental 
Congress are being given every pro- 
tection in the National Archives. 
And through microfilm copies they 
have been made available for use 
throughout the country. 

The nation did not always have 
a safe place to keep its records. For 
example, in 1800, the year that the 
federal government moved to Wash- 
ington, a fire destroyed many of the 
records of the War Department. 

As the volume of records in- 
creased with the growth of the na- 
tion, the conditions under which 
they were kept became worse. Rec- 
ords were damaged by moving them 
from place to place and by damp- 
ness, heat and insects. Stamp collec- 
tors, autograph dealers and thieves 
mutilated or stole valuable docu- 
ments. A government official, with- 
out authorization, once sold 400 
tons of records to a junk dealer be- 
cause he needed the space for his 
office force. 

President Hayes in 1878 and 1879 



recommended that Congress au- 
thorize the construction of a fire- 
proof "Hall of Records." Although 
Congress did not act at that time, 
the idea began to spread that some- 
thing should be done to preserve the 
nation's records. And early in the 
Twentieth Century the idea devel- 
oped that not only should the rec- 
ords be preserved but that they 
should be kept so that they were 
available for use by the govern- 
ment and the public. 

Money was authorized for draw- 
ing up plans for an archives build- 
ing, but World War I delayed its 
construction. Finally in 1926 money 
was appropriated for a National 
Archives Building on the site of the 
old Center Market in Washington. 
President Hoover laid the corner- 
stone on February 20, 1933. 

In 1934 Congress passed an act 
establishing an agency to occupy the 
new building and care for the ar- 
chives, and later that year the first 
Archivist was appointed. At last 
there was an agency of the govern- 
ment dedicated to the preservation 
of the government's records. 

Today the National Archives is 
part of the National Archives and 
Records Service, which itself is part 
of the General Services Administra- 
tion. 

The National Archives Building, 
situated between Seventh and Ninth 
Streets Northwest and between Penn- 
sylvania and Constitution Avenues, 
is part of the Federal Triangle in 
downtown Washington. 

With its 72 Corinthian columns of 
Indiana limestone, the building is an 
imposing example of the classical 
style in architecture. On the building 
and below the statues that flank its 
porticoes are carved such appropri- 
ate inscriptions as: 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



"The glory and romance of our 
history are here preserved in the 
chronicles of those who conceived 
and builded the structure of our 
nation." 

"The heritage of the past is the 
seed that brings forth the harvest of 
the future." 

Each year more than a million 
people come to the National Ar- 
chives from every state in the Un- 
ion and from foreign countries to 
see the most important records of 
our nation. 

Through two bronze doors at the 
Constitution Avenue entrance, said 
to be the largest in the world, they 
enter the impressive Hall of Ar- 
chives. Above its bronze and glass 
exhibit cases, two murals by Barry 
Faulkner portray Thomas Jefferson 
presenting the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence to John Hancock, Presi- 
dent of the Continental Congress, 
and James Madison presenting the 
Constitution to George Washington, 
President of the Constitutional Con- 
vention. 

Outstanding among the documents 
in the Hall of Archives are the Dec- 
laration of Independence, the Con- 
stitution of the United States and the 
Bill of Rights — America's charters 
of freedom. These parchments, set- 
ting forth in flowing script the basis 
of our democratic institutions and 
boldly signed by men whose names 
are now immortal, bear testimony 
to the rights and privileges that we 
enjoy as a free people. 

Scientific measures assure the 
preservation of these parchments; 
guards and mechanical devices pro- 
tect them. Sealed in bronze and 
glass cases filled with helium, these 
precious documents are screened 
from harmful light rays by special 
filters. They can be lowered at a 
moment's notice into a large fire- 
proof and shockproof safe. 

Facsimiles of these documents, 
large enough to read, together with 
accounts of how they came to be 
adopted, are published in "Charters 
of Freedom," which may be pur- 
chased at National Archives for 
25 cents. Facsimiles of other docu- 
ments, such as the Emancipation 
Proclamation, are also available. 

Also in the Hall of Archives are 
displayed other valuable documents 
important in the evolution of our 

JULY, 1965 



government from 1774 to 1790. 
Among them are the Articles of As- 
sociation, the Articles of Confedera- 
tion, Washington's letter announc- 
ing the victory at Yorktown, the 
Treaty of Paris which recognized 
the Independence of the United 
States, and Washington's inaugural 
address of 1789. 

Another large exhibit in the Na- 
tional Archives consists of docu- 
ments, maps, photographs, water- 
colors and prints pertaining to the 
Civil War. The Emancipation Proc- 
lamation signed by Lincoln on Jan- 
uary 1, 1863, is on display, together 
with related documents. Smaller 
exhibits of general or special interest 
are installed from time to time. 

The documents on display are 
only a tiny part of the holdings of 
the National Archives. In all, these 
holdings amount to about 900,000 
cubic feet of records — enough to 
fill 150,000 four-drawer filing cab- 
inets. They include 1,200,000 maps. 
3,200,000 still pictures, 34,000,000 
feet of motion picture films, 160,000 
rolls of microfilm and 35,000 sound 
recordings. They range in date from 
1774 to 1962. 

Most of these records are kept 



in 196 stack areas of the building, 
where they are protected by fire 
walls and by automatically controlled 
temperature and humidity. Absence 
of windows in these areas prevents 
the fading of documents in sun- 
light. At night an automatic alarm 
system guards the stack areas from 
unauthorized access. 

These records are the permanent 
records of the federal government. 
After the Continental Congress pa- 
pers, other records take up the story 
with the establishment of the gov- 
ernment under the Constitution in 
1789. The correspondence of the 
Department of State with our diplo- 
matic representatives abroad is here, 
bound into volumes and written in 
longhand until the typewriter came 
into general use late in the Nine- 
teenth Century. 

Records of the War and Navy 
Departments document our military 
exploits. These agencies had many 
peacetime functions, too, and it is 
thus possible to find among War 
Department records the story of the 
exploration of the West and among 
Navy records accounts of negotia- 
tions carried on by our naval officers 
with foreign governments. 




Nation's three most 

cherished documents 

are housed and 

heavily guarded in 

National Archives 

building. They are the 

Declaration of 

Independence, the 

Constitution and the 

Bill of Rights. 



Part of elaborate 
security mechanism to 
protect precious 
documents is this 
bomb proof vault in 
which they are 
housed when not on 
display. 




Because the National Archives 
contains so many old records, people 
might get the idea that it is nothing 
but a storage place for old records. 
Nothing could be further from the 
truth. Records are preserved in the 
National Archives for the informa- 
tion in them, for the use that can be 
made of them. 

The chief user of records is the 
government itself. It often consults 
the records of the General Land 
Office, which arc indispensable in 
determining titles and other rights 
to land and in defending claims 
against the government. The Bu- 
reau of Indian Affairs, which is still 
responsible for guarding the rights 
of Indians, often consults its own 
records in the National Archives. 

The treason trials of "Axis Sally," 
"Tokyo Rose" and Robert Best after 
World War II entailed the most 
dramatic legal use of archives. All 
of these people were American citi- 
zens who were charged with com- 
mitting treason during the war 
through propaganda broadcasts. 
Their convictions were based in part 
on sound recordings of their own 
words made by the Foreign Broad- 
cast Intelligence Service and deposit- 
ed in the National Archives. 

Individuals are welcome in the 
National Archives search rooms, 
too, and they may make frequent use 
of the records. The National Ar- 
chives is not a reference library, and 
it is not a depository for records of 
birth and death nor for the acts of 
state and local governments. But it 
is the primary source for records re- 
lating to persons or organizations 
which have had dealings of one sort 
or another with the federal govern- 
ment. 

If people, or their forefathers, 
merely lived in the United States 
when the censuses up to 1880 were 
taken, their names will appear on 
the census schedules. Many people 
have received pensions because of 
their military service, and their pen- 
sion applications up until World 
War I are in the Archives. 

Captains of merchant vessels have 
long been required to file the names 
of all passengers who entered United 
States ports from abroad, and these 
lists for much of the Nineteenth Cen- 
tury are in the Archives. 

Information relating to the great- 



est variety of subjects may be found 
among the records in the National 
Archives. The greatest variety of 
subjects, you say. Does that mean 
that you might find information 
about carpenters in the Archives? 

Since the days when carpenters 
built frigates and arsenals for the 
Continental Congress, they have 
worked for the government. For ex- 
ample, among the records of the Bu- 
reau of Lighthouses and its predeces- 
sors is a volume that contains many 
contracts for building lighthouses, 
beacons and light ships from 1815 
to 1822. 

Here we find the articles of agree- 
ment made on August 17, 1820, be- 
tween Timothy Upham, Superin- 
tendent of Lighthouses in New 
Hampshire, on the one part, and 
William Palmer of Dover, mason, 
and Jonathan Folsom of Ports- 
mouth, carpenter, on the other part, 
to build a lighthouse and dwelling 
house on White Island, one of the 
Isles of Shoals. 

"The inside of the Lighthouse," 
the contract reads, "to be divided 
into four apartments or stories of 
equal height, with good floors of 
seasoned two-inch plank, to be laid 
on beams of good seasoned timber, 
twelve inches square, and not more 
than two feet apart. A flight of 
stairs to commence on the ground 
floor, and lead round by the wall, 
in a circular form to the fourth story; 
the stairs to be made of seasoned 
two-inch plank, the passage three 
feet wide and secured on the side 
opposite the wall with substantial 
uprights, and a good railing three 
feet high, with two slats, three inches 
wide, and at equal distances be- 
tween the top rail and the stairs." 

In a volume of proposals and 
estimates received by the Commis- 
sioners of Public Buildings of the 
District of Columbia are numerous 
letters from James Hoban, the build- 
er of the White House. On January 
28, 1797, he writes, "should the 
President's House be covered with 
Shingles, there will be wanted for 
that Building 100 Thousand of the 
best Two feet Cypress Shingles." 

James Hoban's estimates for re- 
building the White House after it 
burned again give many details about 
the woodwork: "A set of plannels 
for one door, each plannel to have 



a handsome curl, and the whole set 
for each Door to match" — all to be 
of the best St. Domingo mahogany. 

Since the early days of the United 
Slates, merchant vessels have had 
to be registered. One of the docu- 
ments filed for each vessel was the 
master carpenter's certificate. These 
certificates, showing the dimensions 
of vessels and dating from 1790, 
are in the National Archives. 

Soon after the Bureau of Labor 
was established in 1884, it began 
building up files of collective bar- 
gaining agreements negotiated by 
various unions and copies of consti- 
tutions and by-laws. Among them 
is an agreement dated April 26, 
1905, between the Master Carpen- 
ters' Association of the City of New 
York and the Joint District Council 
of Greater New York of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join- 
ers of America. It provided for an 
eight-hour day (four hours on Sat- 
urday) at rates for journeymen car- 
penters of from $3.78 to $4.50 per 
day. 

The signed original of labor's 
charter of freedom, the Wagner Na- 
tional Labor Relations Act, is in the 
Archives. So, too, are the records of 
the National Labor Relations Board, 
the National War Labor Board, the 
National Wage Stabilization Board 
and the Labor Department. These 
are only a few of the records that 
have a direct bearing o